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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One

You don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied, one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly — Tom's Aunt Polly, she is-and Mary, and the Widow Douglas, is all told about in that bookwhich is mostly a true book; with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up, is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece-all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher, he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece, all the year roundmore than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas, she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer, I fit out. I got into my old rags, and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer, he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel allcramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go tight to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them. That is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers; and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by-and-by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him; because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the waywith some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now, with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her case up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't putyour feet up there, Huckleberry; " and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry — set up straight; " and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry — why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me A about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad, then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and, she said., not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By-and-by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use.

Synopsis:

Often called America's most important and beloved literary classic, Huckleberry Finn brilliantly captures a boy's journey toward adulthood. In the finest work of his distinguished career, Steven Kellogg has created 18 stunning pictures that capture Twain's timeless blend of humor and suspense. Full coloe.

Synopsis:

Originally intended as a sequel to his immensely popular Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn stands on its own as one of America's most important and beloved literary classics.

For generations, young and old alike have delighted in the unforgettable adventures of runaways Huck Finn and Jim, a slave. In vivid, often gripping prose, Twain brings to fife both the beauty and the folly of preCivil War life along the Mississippifrom the radiant dawn on the river to Huck's terrifying encounters with his father, as well as the outrageous antics of the King and the Duke and Tom Sawyer's outlandish plans to free Jim. Told from Huck's point of view, Huckleberry Finn is also the powerful story of a boy's journey toward adulthood.

In the finest work of his distinguished career, Steven Kellogg has created eighteen stunning pictures that capture Twain's timeless blend of humor and suspense. This is truly an edition that readers of all ages will want to return to again and again.

About the Author

Mark Twain was the pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens. Often called America's greatest satirist, he is best known for his novels The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Prince and the Pauper,and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.Born in 1835, Twain died in 1910.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780688106560
Adapted:
Kellogg, Steven
Author:
Glassman, Peter
Author:
by Mark Twain and Steven Kellogg
Author:
Twain, Mark
Author:
Kellogg, Steven
Publisher:
HarperCollins
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Boys
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Legends, Myths, & Fables - General
Subject:
People & Places - United States
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Literature - Classics / Contemporary
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Adventure stories
Subject:
Voyages and travels
Subject:
Missouri
Subject:
Mississippi river
Subject:
Missouri Fiction.
Subject:
Finn, Huckleberry
Subject:
Voyages and travel
Subject:
Action & Adventure - General
Subject:
Voyages and travels -- Fiction.
Subject:
Slavery -- Fiction.
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Books of Wonder
Series Volume:
0001
Publication Date:
19940927
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 3 to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.16x7.24x1.49 in. 2.19 lbs.
Age Level:
09-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » Classics » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Used Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780688106560 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Often called America's most important and beloved literary classic, Huckleberry Finn brilliantly captures a boy's journey toward adulthood. In the finest work of his distinguished career, Steven Kellogg has created 18 stunning pictures that capture Twain's timeless blend of humor and suspense. Full coloe.
"Synopsis" by , Originally intended as a sequel to his immensely popular Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn stands on its own as one of America's most important and beloved literary classics.

For generations, young and old alike have delighted in the unforgettable adventures of runaways Huck Finn and Jim, a slave. In vivid, often gripping prose, Twain brings to fife both the beauty and the folly of preCivil War life along the Mississippifrom the radiant dawn on the river to Huck's terrifying encounters with his father, as well as the outrageous antics of the King and the Duke and Tom Sawyer's outlandish plans to free Jim. Told from Huck's point of view, Huckleberry Finn is also the powerful story of a boy's journey toward adulthood.

In the finest work of his distinguished career, Steven Kellogg has created eighteen stunning pictures that capture Twain's timeless blend of humor and suspense. This is truly an edition that readers of all ages will want to return to again and again.

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