Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$47.50
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse Politics- United States Foreign Policy

More copies of this ISBN

Truth V. Justice: The Morality of Truth Commissions (University Center for Human Values)

by

Truth V. Justice: The Morality of Truth Commissions (University Center for Human Values) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The truth commission is an increasingly common fixture of newly democratic states with repressive or strife-ridden pasts. From South Africa to Haiti, truth commissions are at work with varying degrees of support and success. To many, they are the best--or only--way to achieve a full accounting of crimes committed against fellow citizens and to prevent future conflict. Others question whether a restorative justice that sets the guilty free, that cleanses society by words alone, can deter future abuses and allow victims and their families to heal. Here, leading philosophers, lawyers, social scientists, and activists representing several perspectives look at the process of truth commissioning in general and in post-apartheid South Africa. They ask whether the truth commission, as a method of seeking justice after conflict, is fair, moral, and effective in bringing about reconciliation.

The authors weigh the virtues and failings of truth commissions, especially the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in their attempt to provide restorative rather than retributive justice. They examine, among other issues, the use of reparations as social policy and the granting of amnesty in exchange for testimony. Most of the contributors praise South Africa's decision to trade due process for the kinds of truth that permit closure. But they are skeptical that such revelations produce reconciliation, particularly in societies that remain divided after a compromise peace with no single victor, as in El Salvador. Ultimately, though, they find the truth commission to be a worthy if imperfect instrument for societies seeking to say "never again" with confidence. At a time when truth commissions have been proposed for Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus, East Timor, Cambodia, Nigeria, Palestine, and elsewhere, the authors' conclusion that restorative justice provides positive gains could not be more important.

In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amy Gutmann, Rajeev Bhargava, Elizabeth Kiss, David A. Crocker, André du Toit, Alex Boraine, Dumisa Ntsebeza, Lisa Kois, Ronald C. Slye, Kent Greenawalt, Sanford Levinson, Martha Minow, Charles S. Maier, Charles Villa-Vicencio, and Wilhelm Verwoerd.

Synopsis:

"This book discusses the vast and complex range of choices in between blanket amnesty and total accountability through criminal justice, and does so with engaged and critical sympathy."--Albie Sachs, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa

"The case for truth commissions is strongly and persuasively presented in these essays, which bring together a remarkable group of lawyers, political theorists, and historians, all of them intelligently engaged with each other's concerns."--Michael Walzer

"Truth commissions have become important institutions to support societies in transition from oppression to democracy. In this outstanding collection of essays well qualified experts consider the legal, political and moral issues associated with such truth commissions."--Richard Goldstone, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa

"This important and innovative text brings together a group of highly accomplished scholars to study one of the most astonishing developments of our times: the thoughtful establishment of commissions to promote reconciliation and reveal truth instead of punishing past offenders."--Jeffrey Herbst, author of States and Power in Africa

Synopsis:

The truth commission is an increasingly common fixture of newly democratic states with repressive or strife-ridden pasts. From South Africa to Haiti, truth commissions are at work with varying degrees of support and success. To many, they are the best--or only--way to achieve a full accounting of crimes committed against fellow citizens and to prevent future conflict. Others question whether a restorative justice that sets the guilty free, that cleanses society by words alone, can deter future abuses and allow victims and their families to heal. Here, leading philosophers, lawyers, social scientists, and activists representing several perspectives look at the process of truth commissioning in general and in post-apartheid South Africa. They ask whether the truth commission, as a method of seeking justice after conflict, is fair, moral, and effective in bringing about reconciliation.

The authors weigh the virtues and failings of truth commissions, especially the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in their attempt to provide restorative rather than retributive justice. They examine, among other issues, the use of reparations as social policy and the granting of amnesty in exchange for testimony. Most of the contributors praise South Africa's decision to trade due process for the kinds of truth that permit closure. But they are skeptical that such revelations produce reconciliation, particularly in societies that remain divided after a compromise peace with no single victor, as in El Salvador. Ultimately, though, they find the truth commission to be a worthy if imperfect instrument for societies seeking to say "never again" with confidence. At a time when truth commissions have been proposed for Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus, East Timor, Cambodia, Nigeria, Palestine, and elsewhere, the authors' conclusion that restorative justice provides positive gains could not be more important.

In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amy Gutmann, Rajeev Bhargava, Elizabeth Kiss, David A. Crocker, André du Toit, Alex Boraine, Dumisa Ntsebeza, Lisa Kois, Ronald C. Slye, Kent Greenawalt, Sanford Levinson, Martha Minow, Charles S. Maier, Charles Villa-Vicencio, and Wilhelm Verwoerd.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

I. Truth Commissions and the Provision of Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation by Robert I. Rotbtrg 3

II. The Moral Foundations of Truth Commissions by Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson 22

III. Restoring Decency to Barbaric Societies by Rajeev Bhargava 45

IV Moral Ambition Within and Beyond Political Constraints: Reflections on Restorative Justice by Elizabeth Kiss 68

V Truth Commissions, Transitional Justice, and Civil Society by David A Crockcr 99

VI. The Moral Foundations of the South African TRC: Truth as Acknowledgment and Justice as Recognition by Andre du Toit 122

VII. Truth and Reconciliation in South Africa: The Third Way by Alex Boraine 141

VIII. The Uses of Truth Commissions: Lessons for the World by Dumisa B. Ntsebexa 158

IX. Amnesty, Truth, and Reconciliation: Reflections on the South African Amnesty Process by Ronald C. Slye 170

X. Amnesty's Justice by Kent Greenawalt 189

XI. Trials, Commissions, and Investigating Committees: The Elusive Search for Norms of Due Process by Sanford Levinson 211

XII. The Hope for Healing: What Can Truth Commissions Do? by Martha Minow 235

XIII. Doing History, Doing Justice: The Narrative of the Historian and of the Truth Commission by Charles S. Mater 261

XIV Constructing a Report: Writing Up the "Truth" by Charles Villa-Yicencio and Wilhelm Yerwoerd 279

The Contributors 295

Index 299

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691050720
Editor:
Rotberg, Robert I.; Thompson, Dennis
Editor:
Thompson, Dennis
Editor:
Rotberg, Robert I.
Editor:
Thompson, Dennis
Author:
Rotberg, Robert I.
Author:
Thompson, Dennis
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
General
Subject:
International
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Civil Rights
Subject:
Human Rights
Subject:
Reconciliation
Subject:
Apartheid
Subject:
Amnesty.
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Civil Rights
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Political philosophy
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
South Africa
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
The University Center for Human Values series
Series Volume:
90-09
Publication Date:
August 2000
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 16 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Violence and Its Alternatives: An... Used Trade Paper $25.00
  2. The Politics of Truth and... New Trade Paper $57.95
  3. Forgiveness and Reconciliation:... New Trade Paper $26.95
  4. When Sorry Isn't Enough: The... New Trade Paper $33.75
  5. Looking for History: Dispatches from... Used Hardcover $4.95
  6. The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's...
    Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Topology

Truth V. Justice: The Morality of Truth Commissions (University Center for Human Values) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$47.50 In Stock
Product details 344 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691050720 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This book discusses the vast and complex range of choices in between blanket amnesty and total accountability through criminal justice, and does so with engaged and critical sympathy."--Albie Sachs, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa

"The case for truth commissions is strongly and persuasively presented in these essays, which bring together a remarkable group of lawyers, political theorists, and historians, all of them intelligently engaged with each other's concerns."--Michael Walzer

"Truth commissions have become important institutions to support societies in transition from oppression to democracy. In this outstanding collection of essays well qualified experts consider the legal, political and moral issues associated with such truth commissions."--Richard Goldstone, Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa

"This important and innovative text brings together a group of highly accomplished scholars to study one of the most astonishing developments of our times: the thoughtful establishment of commissions to promote reconciliation and reveal truth instead of punishing past offenders."--Jeffrey Herbst, author of States and Power in Africa

"Synopsis" by , The truth commission is an increasingly common fixture of newly democratic states with repressive or strife-ridden pasts. From South Africa to Haiti, truth commissions are at work with varying degrees of support and success. To many, they are the best--or only--way to achieve a full accounting of crimes committed against fellow citizens and to prevent future conflict. Others question whether a restorative justice that sets the guilty free, that cleanses society by words alone, can deter future abuses and allow victims and their families to heal. Here, leading philosophers, lawyers, social scientists, and activists representing several perspectives look at the process of truth commissioning in general and in post-apartheid South Africa. They ask whether the truth commission, as a method of seeking justice after conflict, is fair, moral, and effective in bringing about reconciliation.

The authors weigh the virtues and failings of truth commissions, especially the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in their attempt to provide restorative rather than retributive justice. They examine, among other issues, the use of reparations as social policy and the granting of amnesty in exchange for testimony. Most of the contributors praise South Africa's decision to trade due process for the kinds of truth that permit closure. But they are skeptical that such revelations produce reconciliation, particularly in societies that remain divided after a compromise peace with no single victor, as in El Salvador. Ultimately, though, they find the truth commission to be a worthy if imperfect instrument for societies seeking to say "never again" with confidence. At a time when truth commissions have been proposed for Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus, East Timor, Cambodia, Nigeria, Palestine, and elsewhere, the authors' conclusion that restorative justice provides positive gains could not be more important.

In addition to the editors, the contributors are Amy Gutmann, Rajeev Bhargava, Elizabeth Kiss, David A. Crocker, André du Toit, Alex Boraine, Dumisa Ntsebeza, Lisa Kois, Ronald C. Slye, Kent Greenawalt, Sanford Levinson, Martha Minow, Charles S. Maier, Charles Villa-Vicencio, and Wilhelm Verwoerd.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.