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25 Remote Warehouse World History- Ancient History

Dreams in Late Antiquity: Studies in the Imagination of a Culture (Mythos)

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Dreams in Late Antiquity: Studies in the Imagination of a Culture (Mythos) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Dream interpretation was a prominent feature of the intellectual and imaginative world of late antiquity, for martyrs and magicians, philosophers and theologians, polytheists and monotheists alike. Finding it difficult to account for the prevalence of dream-divination, modern scholarship has often condemned it as a cultural weakness, a mass lapse into mere superstition. In this book, Patricia Cox Miller draws on pagan, Jewish, and Christian sources and modern semiotic theory to demonstrate the integral importance of dreams in late-antique thought and life. She argues that Graeco-Roman dream literature functioned as a language of signs that formed a personal and cultural pattern of imagination and gave tangible substance to ideas such as time, cosmic history, and the self.

Miller first discusses late-antique theories of dreaming, with emphasis on theological, philosophical, and hermeneutical methods of deciphering dreams as well as the practical uses of dreams, especially in magic and the cult of Asclepius. She then considers the cases of six Graeco-Roman dreamers: Hermas, Perpetua, Aelius Aristides, Jerome, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nazianus. Her detailed readings illuminate the ways in which dreams provided solutions to ethical and religious problems, allowed for the reconfiguration of gender and identity, provided occasions for the articulation of ethical ideas, and altogether served as a means of making sense and order of the world.

Synopsis:

Dream interpretation was a prominent feature of the intellectual and imaginative world of late antiquity, for martyrs and magicians, philosophers and theologians, polytheists and monotheists alike. Finding it difficult to account for the prevalence of dream-divination, modern scholarship has often condemned it as a cultural weakness, a mass lapse into mere superstition. In this book, Patricia Cox Miller draws on pagan, Jewish, and Christian sources and modern semiotic theory to demonstrate the integral importance of dreams in late-antique thought and life. She argues that Graeco-Roman dream literature functioned as a language of signs that formed a personal and cultural pattern of imagination and gave tangible substance to ideas such as time, cosmic history, and the self.

Miller first discusses late-antique theories of dreaming, with emphasis on theological, philosophical, and hermeneutical methods of deciphering dreams as well as the practical uses of dreams, especially in magic and the cult of Asclepius. She then considers the cases of six Graeco-Roman dreamers: Hermas, Perpetua, Aelius Aristides, Jerome, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nazianus. Her detailed readings illuminate the ways in which dreams provided solutions to ethical and religious problems, allowed for the reconfiguration of gender and identity, provided occasions for the articulation of ethical ideas, and altogether served as a means of making sense and order of the world.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-270) and index.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Abbreviation
Pt. IImages and Concepts of Dreaming
Ch. 1Figurations of Dream14
Ch. 2Theories of Dreams39
Ch. 3Interpretation of Dreams74
Ch. 4Dreams and Therapy106
Pt. IIDreamers
Ch. 5Hermas and the Shepherd131
Ch. 6Perpetua and Her Diary of Dreams148
Ch. 7Aelius Aristides and The Sacred Tales184
Ch. 8Jerome and His Dreams205
Ch. 9The Two Gregorys and Ascetic Dreaming232
Bibliography255
Index271

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691058351
Author:
Miller, Patricia Cox
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
Philosophy, ancient
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Ancient - General
Subject:
Dreams
Subject:
Imagination
Subject:
Psychology of Religion
Subject:
Classical literature
Subject:
Christian literature, early
Subject:
Civilization, greco-roman
Subject:
Dreams in literature.
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Mind, Body & Spirit
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
World History-Ancient History
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Mythos: The Princeton/Bollingen Series in World Mythology
Publication Date:
December 1997
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 15 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ancient History
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Metaphysics » General

Dreams in Late Antiquity: Studies in the Imagination of a Culture (Mythos) New Trade Paper
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Product details 288 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691058351 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Dream interpretation was a prominent feature of the intellectual and imaginative world of late antiquity, for martyrs and magicians, philosophers and theologians, polytheists and monotheists alike. Finding it difficult to account for the prevalence of dream-divination, modern scholarship has often condemned it as a cultural weakness, a mass lapse into mere superstition. In this book, Patricia Cox Miller draws on pagan, Jewish, and Christian sources and modern semiotic theory to demonstrate the integral importance of dreams in late-antique thought and life. She argues that Graeco-Roman dream literature functioned as a language of signs that formed a personal and cultural pattern of imagination and gave tangible substance to ideas such as time, cosmic history, and the self.

Miller first discusses late-antique theories of dreaming, with emphasis on theological, philosophical, and hermeneutical methods of deciphering dreams as well as the practical uses of dreams, especially in magic and the cult of Asclepius. She then considers the cases of six Graeco-Roman dreamers: Hermas, Perpetua, Aelius Aristides, Jerome, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nazianus. Her detailed readings illuminate the ways in which dreams provided solutions to ethical and religious problems, allowed for the reconfiguration of gender and identity, provided occasions for the articulation of ethical ideas, and altogether served as a means of making sense and order of the world.

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