Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 17, 2014

Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

spacer

On Order

$42.50
New Trade Paper
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Health and Medicine- History of Medicine

Other titles in the Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America series:

Dead on Arrival: The Politics of Health Care in Twentieth-Century America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America)

by

Dead on Arrival: The Politics of Health Care in Twentieth-Century America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Why, alone among industrial democracies, does the United States not have national health insurance? While many books have addressed this question, Dead on Arrival is the first to do so based on original archival research for the full sweep of the twentieth century. Drawing on a wide range of political, reform, business, and labor records, Colin Gordon traces a complex and interwoven story of political failure and private response. He examines, in turn, the emergence of private, work-based benefits; the uniquely American pursuit of "social insurance"; the influence of race and gender on the health care debate; and the ongoing confrontation between reformers and powerful economic and health interests.

Dead on Arrival stands alone in accounting for the failure of national or universal health policy from the early twentieth century to the present. As importantly, it also suggests how various interests (doctors, hospitals, patients, workers, employers, labor unions, medical reformers, and political parties) confronted the question of health care--as a private responsibility, as a job-based benefit, as a political obligation, and as a fundamental right.

Using health care as a window onto the logic of American politics and American social provision, Gordon both deepens and informs the contemporary debate. Fluidly written and deftly argued, Dead on Arrival is thus not only a compelling history of the health care quandary but a fascinating exploration of the country's political economy and political culture through "the American century," of the role of private interests and private benefits in the shaping of social policy, and, ultimately, of the ways the American welfare state empowers but also imprisons its citizens.

Synopsis:

"This is a bold, clearly written, and engaging analysis of the place of universal health insurance in the American welfare state. It represents a serious argument about the American political arena, presents a plausible argument for its position, and backs that up with a standard of scholarship I respect."--Ted Marmor, Yale University, author of The Politics of Medicare

Synopsis:

Why, alone among industrial democracies, does the United States not have national health insurance? While many books have addressed this question, Dead on Arrival is the first to do so based on original archival research for the full sweep of the twentieth century. Drawing on a wide range of political, reform, business, and labor records, Colin Gordon traces a complex and interwoven story of political failure and private response. He examines, in turn, the emergence of private, work-based benefits; the uniquely American pursuit of "social insurance"; the influence of race and gender on the health care debate; and the ongoing confrontation between reformers and powerful economic and health interests.

Dead on Arrival stands alone in accounting for the failure of national or universal health policy from the early twentieth century to the present. As importantly, it also suggests how various interests (doctors, hospitals, patients, workers, employers, labor unions, medical reformers, and political parties) confronted the question of health care--as a private responsibility, as a job-based benefit, as a political obligation, and as a fundamental right.

Using health care as a window onto the logic of American politics and American social provision, Gordon both deepens and informs the contemporary debate. Fluidly written and deftly argued, Dead on Arrival is thus not only a compelling history of the health care quandary but a fascinating exploration of the country's political economy and political culture through "the American century," of the role of private interests and private benefits in the shaping of social policy, and, ultimately, of the ways the American welfare state empowers but also imprisons its citizens.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Abbreviations xi

Introduction: Why No National Health Insurance in the United States? 1

1. The Political Economy of American Health Care: An Overview, 1910-2000 12

2. Bargaining for Health: Private Health Insurance and Public Policy 46

3. Between Contract and Charity: Health Care and the Dilemmas of Social Insurance 90

4. Socialized Medicine and Other Afflictions: The Political Culture of the Health Debate 136

5. Health Care in Black and White: Race, Region, and Health Politics 172

6. Private Interests and Public Policy: Health Care's Corporate Compromise 210

7. Silenced Majority: American Politics and the Dilemmas of Health Reform 261

Conclusion: The Past and Future of Health Politics 297

Archival Sources 303

Index 307

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691119519
Author:
Gordon, Colin
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Health Policy
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Health and Medicine-History of Medicine
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century American
Publication Date:
November 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 17 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Caring for the country :a history... Used Hardcover $4.95
  2. History and Health Policy in the... Used Trade Paper $20.00
  3. Civil War Medicine (Illustrated... Used Trade Paper $10.95
  4. Competitive Managed Care: The... New Hardcover $72.50
  5. Bleed, Blister, and Purge: A History... Used Trade Paper $10.00
  6. Origins of American Health... New Hardcover $50.25

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » US History » General

Dead on Arrival: The Politics of Health Care in Twentieth-Century America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$42.50 Backorder
Product details 336 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691119519 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This is a bold, clearly written, and engaging analysis of the place of universal health insurance in the American welfare state. It represents a serious argument about the American political arena, presents a plausible argument for its position, and backs that up with a standard of scholarship I respect."--Ted Marmor, Yale University, author of The Politics of Medicare
"Synopsis" by , Why, alone among industrial democracies, does the United States not have national health insurance? While many books have addressed this question, Dead on Arrival is the first to do so based on original archival research for the full sweep of the twentieth century. Drawing on a wide range of political, reform, business, and labor records, Colin Gordon traces a complex and interwoven story of political failure and private response. He examines, in turn, the emergence of private, work-based benefits; the uniquely American pursuit of "social insurance"; the influence of race and gender on the health care debate; and the ongoing confrontation between reformers and powerful economic and health interests.

Dead on Arrival stands alone in accounting for the failure of national or universal health policy from the early twentieth century to the present. As importantly, it also suggests how various interests (doctors, hospitals, patients, workers, employers, labor unions, medical reformers, and political parties) confronted the question of health care--as a private responsibility, as a job-based benefit, as a political obligation, and as a fundamental right.

Using health care as a window onto the logic of American politics and American social provision, Gordon both deepens and informs the contemporary debate. Fluidly written and deftly argued, Dead on Arrival is thus not only a compelling history of the health care quandary but a fascinating exploration of the country's political economy and political culture through "the American century," of the role of private interests and private benefits in the shaping of social policy, and, ultimately, of the ways the American welfare state empowers but also imprisons its citizens.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.