The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | July 22, 2014

Nick Harkaway: IMG The Florist-Assassins



The three men lit up in my mind's eye, with footnotes. They were converging on me — and on the object I was carrying — in a way that had... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Tigerman

    Nick Harkaway 9780385352413

spacer

Notes from the Balkans: Locating Marginality and Ambiguity on the Greek-Albanian Border (Princeton Modern Greek Studies)

by

Notes from the Balkans: Locating Marginality and Ambiguity on the Greek-Albanian Border (Princeton Modern Greek Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Notes from the Balkans is a classic. I cannot name a single work that succeeds so consistently in underscoring the contextually specific and negotiable character of social identity without falling into the cynical trap of treating the dynamics of social identification and disavowal as nothing more than 'strategic.' Nor can I name more than one or two ethnographic forays into the jargon-laden terrains of the anthropology of alternative modernities that are even remotely as engaging and as readable. Wry and straightforward, Green's writing also has genuine life; it is very often a vivid text and its vividness is even further served by the well-chosen selection of visual materials that complement it."--James Faubion, Rice University, author of Rethinking the Subject

"This is an innovative, event-rich, and energising book. The author quite brilliantly turns an archaeological project, how to model different 'times' layered in the landscape into an anthropological one, where the issue is the overlapping and intersecting sectarianism in everything that is understood as 'Balkan.' The result is a resounding critique of the popular notion of fragmentation. And a significant anticipation: after lying dormant for a decade or more, complexity theory is about to re-enter anthropology with very much a twenty-first century cast, and here she has laid out a fascinating field. Above all, among the dimensions in this work that keep their scale is a sense of close involvement and directness that also makes it a very human account. This is anthropological life indeed!"--Marilyn Strathern, University of Cambridge, author of Property, Substance and Effect: Anthropological Essays on Persons and Things

"This is a refreshingly original, well-written, richly insightful, and intellectually agile look at a little-understood segment of the Balkan region. It provocatively undercuts conventional understandings of that region itself, showing how its peculiar and often evanescent features reflect a complex political reality that is reproduced in shimmering fragments on the ground. With a deft interplay between artfully casual-seeming ethnographic vignettes and what are clearly the results of sometimes backbreaking traversals of a rough and complex territory, she shows how the ordinary and the marginal constitute the best hope for understanding the political processes that generate precisely those conditions."--Michael Herzfeld, Harvard University, author of The Body Impolitic

Synopsis:

"Notes from the Balkans is a classic. I cannot name a single work that succeeds so consistently in underscoring the contextually specific and negotiable character of social identity without falling into the cynical trap of treating the dynamics of social identification and disavowal as nothing more than 'strategic.' Nor can I name more than one or two ethnographic forays into the jargon-laden terrains of the anthropology of alternative modernities that are even remotely as engaging and as readable. Wry and straightforward, Green's writing also has genuine life; it is very often a vivid text and its vividness is even further served by the well-chosen selection of visual materials that complement it."--James Faubion, Rice University, author of Rethinking the Subject

"This is an innovative, event-rich, and energising book. The author quite brilliantly turns an archaeological project, how to model different 'times' layered in the landscape into an anthropological one, where the issue is the overlapping and intersecting sectarianism in everything that is understood as 'Balkan.' The result is a resounding critique of the popular notion of fragmentation. And a significant anticipation: after lying dormant for a decade or more, complexity theory is about to re-enter anthropology with very much a twenty-first century cast, and here she has laid out a fascinating field. Above all, among the dimensions in this work that keep their scale is a sense of close involvement and directness that also makes it a very human account. This is anthropological life indeed!"--Marilyn Strathern, University of Cambridge, author of Property, Substance and Effect: Anthropological Essays on Persons and Things

"This is a refreshingly original, well-written, richly insightful, and intellectually agile look at a little-understood segment of the Balkan region. It provocatively undercuts conventional understandings of that region itself, showing how its peculiar and often evanescent features reflect a complex political reality that is reproduced in shimmering fragments on the ground. With a deft interplay between artfully casual-seeming ethnographic vignettes and what are clearly the results of sometimes backbreaking traversals of a rough and complex territory, she shows how the ordinary and the marginal constitute the best hope for understanding the political processes that generate precisely those conditions."--Michael Herzfeld, Harvard University, author of The Body Impolitic

Synopsis:

Maps and borders notwithstanding, some places are best described as "gaps"--places with repeatedly contested boundaries that are wedged in between other places that have clear boundaries. This book explores an iconic example of this in the contemporary Western imagination: the Balkans. Drawing on richly detailed ethnographic research around the Greek-Albanian border, Sarah Green focuses her groundbreaking analysis on the ambiguities of never quite resolving where or what places are. One consequence for some Greek peoples in this border area is a seeming lack of distinction--but in a distinctly "Balkan" way. In gaps (which are never empty), marginality is, in contrast with conventional understandings, not a matter of difference and separation--it is a lack thereof.

Notes from the Balkans represents the first ethnographic approach to exploring "the Balkans" as an ideological concept. Green argues that, rather than representing a tension between "West" and "East," the Balkans makes such oppositions ambiguous. This kind of marginality means that such places and peoples can hardly engage with "multiculturalism." Moreover, the region's ambiguity threatens clear, modernist distinctions. The violence so closely associated with the region can therefore be seen as part of continual attempts to resolve the ambiguities by imposing fixed separations. And every time this fails, the region is once again defined as a place that will continually proliferate such dangerous ambiguity, and could spread it somewhere else.

Table of Contents

List of Maps and Figures ix

List of Tables xi

Acknowledgments xiii

Notes on Transliteration, Translation, and Pseudonyms xvii

CHAPTER 1: Marginal Margins 1

CHAPTER 2: Travels 40

CHAPTER 3: Moving Mountains 89

CHAPTER 4: The Balkan Fractal 128

CHAPTER 5: Counting 159

CHAPTER 6: Embodied Recounting 176

CHAPTER 7: Developments 218

APPENDIX: Tables 249

Notes 261

Bibliography 279

Index 297

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691121994
Editor:
Gondicas, Dimitri H.
Editor:
Brown, Peter
Editor:
Gondicas, Dimitri H.
Editor:
Brown, Peter
Author:
Green, Sarah F.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
History
Subject:
Boundaries
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Minority Studies - General
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Marginality, Social - Greece -
Subject:
Pogoni (Greece: Region) - Social conditions
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Immigration
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Modern Greek Studies
Publication Date:
July 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
12 halftones. 20 tables. 8 maps.
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 20 oz

Other books you might like

  1. The Oxford Greek Dictionary:... Used Mass Market $4.50
  2. Passing Through: The Later Poems New... Used Trade Paper $9.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Reference » Readers Reference
Reference » Reading

Notes from the Balkans: Locating Marginality and Ambiguity on the Greek-Albanian Border (Princeton Modern Greek Studies) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$42.50 Backorder
Product details 336 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691121994 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Notes from the Balkans is a classic. I cannot name a single work that succeeds so consistently in underscoring the contextually specific and negotiable character of social identity without falling into the cynical trap of treating the dynamics of social identification and disavowal as nothing more than 'strategic.' Nor can I name more than one or two ethnographic forays into the jargon-laden terrains of the anthropology of alternative modernities that are even remotely as engaging and as readable. Wry and straightforward, Green's writing also has genuine life; it is very often a vivid text and its vividness is even further served by the well-chosen selection of visual materials that complement it."--James Faubion, Rice University, author of Rethinking the Subject

"This is an innovative, event-rich, and energising book. The author quite brilliantly turns an archaeological project, how to model different 'times' layered in the landscape into an anthropological one, where the issue is the overlapping and intersecting sectarianism in everything that is understood as 'Balkan.' The result is a resounding critique of the popular notion of fragmentation. And a significant anticipation: after lying dormant for a decade or more, complexity theory is about to re-enter anthropology with very much a twenty-first century cast, and here she has laid out a fascinating field. Above all, among the dimensions in this work that keep their scale is a sense of close involvement and directness that also makes it a very human account. This is anthropological life indeed!"--Marilyn Strathern, University of Cambridge, author of Property, Substance and Effect: Anthropological Essays on Persons and Things

"This is a refreshingly original, well-written, richly insightful, and intellectually agile look at a little-understood segment of the Balkan region. It provocatively undercuts conventional understandings of that region itself, showing how its peculiar and often evanescent features reflect a complex political reality that is reproduced in shimmering fragments on the ground. With a deft interplay between artfully casual-seeming ethnographic vignettes and what are clearly the results of sometimes backbreaking traversals of a rough and complex territory, she shows how the ordinary and the marginal constitute the best hope for understanding the political processes that generate precisely those conditions."--Michael Herzfeld, Harvard University, author of The Body Impolitic

"Synopsis" by , Maps and borders notwithstanding, some places are best described as "gaps"--places with repeatedly contested boundaries that are wedged in between other places that have clear boundaries. This book explores an iconic example of this in the contemporary Western imagination: the Balkans. Drawing on richly detailed ethnographic research around the Greek-Albanian border, Sarah Green focuses her groundbreaking analysis on the ambiguities of never quite resolving where or what places are. One consequence for some Greek peoples in this border area is a seeming lack of distinction--but in a distinctly "Balkan" way. In gaps (which are never empty), marginality is, in contrast with conventional understandings, not a matter of difference and separation--it is a lack thereof.

Notes from the Balkans represents the first ethnographic approach to exploring "the Balkans" as an ideological concept. Green argues that, rather than representing a tension between "West" and "East," the Balkans makes such oppositions ambiguous. This kind of marginality means that such places and peoples can hardly engage with "multiculturalism." Moreover, the region's ambiguity threatens clear, modernist distinctions. The violence so closely associated with the region can therefore be seen as part of continual attempts to resolve the ambiguities by imposing fixed separations. And every time this fails, the region is once again defined as a place that will continually proliferate such dangerous ambiguity, and could spread it somewhere else.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.