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Other titles in the Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America series:

The Radical Middle Class: Populist Democracy and the Question of Capitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon (Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America)

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The Radical Middle Class: Populist Democracy and the Question of Capitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon (Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"A historical tour de force of the Progressive era in a middle class city, Professor Johnston's book will begin to unravel the stultifying stereotyping of the middle classes and remove cobwebs of inaction from the minds of today's civic organizers and thinkers."--Ralph Nader

"This is one of the most original, provocative, and imaginative works about the modern U.S. that I have read in years. Johnston has produced far more than a splendid history about the neglected politics of a neglected city. His book is studded with insights about what it meant and means to be middle class and the fecund nature of populism in industrial and post-industrial America. What is more, he gives us hope for the future."--Michael Kazin, Georgetown University, author of The Populist Persuasion: An American History

"Johnston's daring, meticulous, subtle, and analytically acute study of Portland's lower middle class leaves hundreds of shallow and condescending cliches about the petite bourgeoisie mortally wounded or gasping for breath in its splendid wake. He succeeds in restoring the historical autonomy, particularity, and egalitarian moral economy of America's lower middle classes. As with E.P. Thompson's history of the English working class, subsequent work on the middle class in America must now take this study as its point of departure."--James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

"Johnston seizes the Progressive Era and gives it back to the people. He argues that the roots of reform flourished among average citizens, those who thought that they could change the world by reasoning and voting together. This is a book about democracy at its best. Johnston recalls America's potential and underscores the paramount importance of civic activism on the local level."--Glenda E. Gilmore, editor of Who Were the Progesssives? and author of Gender and Jim Crow

"In this very exciting study, Johnston has truly broken new ground. For all its theoretical sophistication, the book is written with flair and is blessedly free of arcane jargon. The prose is clear, powerful, and even jaunty at times. The Radical Middle Class will become one of those rare and important books that no scholar of U.S. class relations and politics will be able to ignore."--Elaine Tyler May, author of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era

"Robert Johnston has written a terrific book, engaging one of the most neglected and important topics in U.S. history: the political history of the middle class. More successful than some of his predecessors, he gives middle-class Americans the history they so richly deserve. Powerfully argued, splendidly told, and provocatively fresh, The Radical Middle Class marks a milestone in the historiography of the American middle class. It is really the first book of its kind."--Sven Beckert, Harvard University, author of The Monied Metropolis: New York City and the Consolidation of the American Bourgeoisie

Synopsis:

"A historical tour de force of the Progressive era in a middle class city, Professor Johnston's book will begin to unravel the stultifying stereotyping of the middle classes and remove cobwebs of inaction from the minds of today's civic organizers and thinkers."--Ralph Nader

"This is one of the most original, provocative, and imaginative works about the modern U.S. that I have read in years. Johnston has produced far more than a splendid history about the neglected politics of a neglected city. His book is studded with insights about what it meant and means to be middle class and the fecund nature of populism in industrial and post-industrial America. What is more, he gives us hope for the future."--Michael Kazin, Georgetown University, author of The Populist Persuasion: An American History

"Johnston's daring, meticulous, subtle, and analytically acute study of Portland's lower middle class leaves hundreds of shallow and condescending cliches about the petite bourgeoisie mortally wounded or gasping for breath in its splendid wake. He succeeds in restoring the historical autonomy, particularity, and egalitarian moral economy of America's lower middle classes. As with E.P. Thompson's history of the English working class, subsequent work on the middle class in America must now take this study as its point of departure."--James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

"Johnston seizes the Progressive Era and gives it back to the people. He argues that the roots of reform flourished among average citizens, those who thought that they could change the world by reasoning and voting together. This is a book about democracy at its best. Johnston recalls America's potential and underscores the paramount importance of civic activism on the local level."--Glenda E. Gilmore, editor of Who Were the Progesssives? and author of Gender and Jim Crow

"In this very exciting study, Johnston has truly broken new ground. For all its theoretical sophistication, the book is written with flair and is blessedly free of arcane jargon. The prose is clear, powerful, and even jaunty at times. The Radical Middle Class will become one of those rare and important books that no scholar of U.S. class relations and politics will be able to ignore."--Elaine Tyler May, author of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era

"Robert Johnston has written a terrific book, engaging one of the most neglected and important topics in U.S. history: the political history of the middle class. More successful than some of his predecessors, he gives middle-class Americans the history they so richly deserve. Powerfully argued, splendidly told, and provocatively fresh, The Radical Middle Class marks a milestone in the historiography of the American middle class. It is really the first book of its kind."--Sven Beckert, Harvard University, author of The Monied Metropolis: New York City and the Consolidation of the American Bourgeoisie

Synopsis:

America has a long tradition of middle-class radicalism, albeit one that intellectual orthodoxy has tended to obscure. The Radical Middle Class seeks to uncover the democratic, populist, and even anticapitalist legacy of the middle class. By examining in particular the independent small business sector or petite bourgeoisie, using Progressive Era Portland, Oregon, as a case study, Robert Johnston shows that class still matters in America. But it matters only if the politics and culture of the leading player in affairs of class, the middle class, is dramatically reconceived.

This book is a powerful combination of intellectual, business, labor, medical, and, above all, political history. Its author also humanizes the middle class by describing the lives of four small business owners: Harry Lane, Will Daly, William U'Ren, and Lora Little. Lane was Portland's reform mayor before becoming one of only six senators to vote against U.S. entry into World War I. Daly was Oregon's most prominent labor leader and a onetime Socialist. U'Ren was the national architect of the direct democracy movement. Little was a leading antivaccinationist.

The Radical Middle Class further explores the Portland Ku Klux Klan and concludes with a national overview of the American middle class from the Progressive Era to the present. With its engaging narrative, conceptual richness, and daring argumentation, it will be welcomed by all who understand that reexamining the middle class can yield not only better scholarship but firmer grounds for democratic hope.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Maps ix

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xvii

PART I: REHABILITATING THE AMERICAN MIDDLE CLASS 1

One: Rethinking the Middle Class: Politics, History, and Theory 3

Two: Curt Muller and the Capitalist Middle Class: Social Misconstructions of Reality 18

Three: Harry Lane and the Radicalism of Middle-Class Reform 29

PART II: THE POPULIST POLITICAL ECONOMY OF PROGRESSIVE ERA PORTLAND 47

Four: The Contours of Class in Portland 51

Five: Capitalism, Anticapitalism, and the Solidarity of Middle Class and Working Class 74

Six: Petit Bourgeois Politics in Portland and World History 90

Seven: Will Daly: The Petit Bourgeois Hero of Labor 99

PART III: "THE MOST COMPLETE DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD": THE POPULIST RADICALISM OF DIRECT DEMOCRACY 115

Eight: Direct Democracy as Antidemocracy? The Evolution of the Oregon System, 1884-1908 119

Nine: Direct Democracy's Mechanic: William S. U'Ren 127

Ten: From the Grand Reorganization to a Syndicalism of Housewives: Feminist Populism and the Other Spirit of '76 138

Eleven: The Political Economy of Populist Democracy: The Single Tax Movement in Portland, 1908-1916 159

PART IV: A POPULISM OF THE BODY: THE RATIONALITY AND RADICALISM OF ANTIVACCINATIONISM 177

Twelve: A Deluded Mob of Ignorant Fools? The Historiography of Antivaccination, and the Risks of Vaccination 179

Thirteen: Shutting Down the Schools: Parents and Protest in Mt. Scott 191

Fourteen: From the Death of a Child to Sedition against the State: The Life and Ideology of Lora C. Little 197

Fifteen: Direct Democracy and Antivaccination 207

Sixteen: The Success and Radicalism of Antivaccination 218

PART V. THE USES OF POPULISM AFTER PROGRESSIVISM: THE 1922 SCHOOL BILL AND THE TRIUMPH OF THE KU KLUX KLAN 221

Seventeen: School Boards and Strikes: Petite Bourgeoisie against Elite 223

Eighteen: Liberal Populism: The Compulsory Public School Bill 227

Nineteen: Corporate Tools: The Middling World of the Portland Klan 234

Twenty: The Producer's Call and the Portland Housewives' Council: The Tenuous Survival of Petit Bourgeois Radicalism 248

PART VI: CONCLUSION: POPULISM, CAPITALISM, AND THE POLITICS OF THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN MIDDLE CLASS 255

Twenty-One: The Lower Middle Class in the American Century 257

Twenty-Two: The Fate of Populism: Moral Economy and the Resurgence of Middle-Class Politics 266

Appendix 1: Tables 279

Appendix 2: Map, Voter Registration Density by Precinct, 1916 291

Abbreviations 293

Notes 295

Index 381

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691126005
Author:
Johnston, Robert D.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Democracy
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Pacific Northwest
Subject:
American history
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America
Publication Date:
February 2006
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
37 halftones. 13 tables. 12 maps.
Pages:
424
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 21 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » History
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Oregon » Books About Oregon
History and Social Science » Pacific Northwest » Oregon » Portland » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Radical Middle Class: Populist Democracy and the Question of Capitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon (Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America) New Trade Paper
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$45.25 Backorder
Product details 424 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691126005 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "A historical tour de force of the Progressive era in a middle class city, Professor Johnston's book will begin to unravel the stultifying stereotyping of the middle classes and remove cobwebs of inaction from the minds of today's civic organizers and thinkers."--Ralph Nader

"This is one of the most original, provocative, and imaginative works about the modern U.S. that I have read in years. Johnston has produced far more than a splendid history about the neglected politics of a neglected city. His book is studded with insights about what it meant and means to be middle class and the fecund nature of populism in industrial and post-industrial America. What is more, he gives us hope for the future."--Michael Kazin, Georgetown University, author of The Populist Persuasion: An American History

"Johnston's daring, meticulous, subtle, and analytically acute study of Portland's lower middle class leaves hundreds of shallow and condescending cliches about the petite bourgeoisie mortally wounded or gasping for breath in its splendid wake. He succeeds in restoring the historical autonomy, particularity, and egalitarian moral economy of America's lower middle classes. As with E.P. Thompson's history of the English working class, subsequent work on the middle class in America must now take this study as its point of departure."--James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

"Johnston seizes the Progressive Era and gives it back to the people. He argues that the roots of reform flourished among average citizens, those who thought that they could change the world by reasoning and voting together. This is a book about democracy at its best. Johnston recalls America's potential and underscores the paramount importance of civic activism on the local level."--Glenda E. Gilmore, editor of Who Were the Progesssives? and author of Gender and Jim Crow

"In this very exciting study, Johnston has truly broken new ground. For all its theoretical sophistication, the book is written with flair and is blessedly free of arcane jargon. The prose is clear, powerful, and even jaunty at times. The Radical Middle Class will become one of those rare and important books that no scholar of U.S. class relations and politics will be able to ignore."--Elaine Tyler May, author of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era

"Robert Johnston has written a terrific book, engaging one of the most neglected and important topics in U.S. history: the political history of the middle class. More successful than some of his predecessors, he gives middle-class Americans the history they so richly deserve. Powerfully argued, splendidly told, and provocatively fresh, The Radical Middle Class marks a milestone in the historiography of the American middle class. It is really the first book of its kind."--Sven Beckert, Harvard University, author of The Monied Metropolis: New York City and the Consolidation of the American Bourgeoisie

"Synopsis" by , America has a long tradition of middle-class radicalism, albeit one that intellectual orthodoxy has tended to obscure. The Radical Middle Class seeks to uncover the democratic, populist, and even anticapitalist legacy of the middle class. By examining in particular the independent small business sector or petite bourgeoisie, using Progressive Era Portland, Oregon, as a case study, Robert Johnston shows that class still matters in America. But it matters only if the politics and culture of the leading player in affairs of class, the middle class, is dramatically reconceived.

This book is a powerful combination of intellectual, business, labor, medical, and, above all, political history. Its author also humanizes the middle class by describing the lives of four small business owners: Harry Lane, Will Daly, William U'Ren, and Lora Little. Lane was Portland's reform mayor before becoming one of only six senators to vote against U.S. entry into World War I. Daly was Oregon's most prominent labor leader and a onetime Socialist. U'Ren was the national architect of the direct democracy movement. Little was a leading antivaccinationist.

The Radical Middle Class further explores the Portland Ku Klux Klan and concludes with a national overview of the American middle class from the Progressive Era to the present. With its engaging narrative, conceptual richness, and daring argumentation, it will be welcomed by all who understand that reexamining the middle class can yield not only better scholarship but firmer grounds for democratic hope.

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