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Other titles in the Princeton Studies in International History and Politics series:

Social States: China in International Institutions, 1980-2000 (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

by

Social States: China in International Institutions, 1980-2000 (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"This book is most significant for theoretical, empirical, and political reasons. Theoretically, it explores in detail micromechanisms of socialization, moving way beyond the traditional rationalist-constructivist divide. Empirically, the book demonstrates that even China changes through socialization in international institutions. The political conclusions are obvious: Keep socializing China rather than balancing!"--Thomas Risse, Freie Universität Berlin

"This eagerly awaited book offers the most compelling analysis for China's 'peaceful rise' that I know of. Iain Johnston displays a complete mastery of international relations theory, a profound knowledge of Chinese foreign policy and East Asian regionalism, and impressive control over modern social science methods. For many years to come this will be the landmark study of one of the most important developments in contemporary world politics."--Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

"Iain Johnston's Social States is a must-read for all students of international relations theory, international institutions, and international security. With his characteristic hardheaded and systematically minded approach to the big debates in international relations, Johnston has produced the single-best statement regarding socialization in contemporary global affairs. And his deep knowledge of China and institutional institutions allows him to address some of the most critical questions regarding the future global order."--Michael Barnett, University of Minnesota

"This is a timely, compelling, and deeply impressive piece of scholarship by one of the very best world-class international scholars writing on Chinese foreign policy and international relations theory today. The vividness of the writing, combined with coherent organization and dispassionate empirical analysis, are certain to make this an essential work for seasoned China watchers. At the same time, the book's bold and analytically arresting observations will compel policymakers to question their personal assumptions and hidden prejudices."--Samuel Kim, Columbia University

"In his latest first-rate work, Iain Johnston argues that, over the past twenty years, China has been socialized--often without side payments and at the expense of its narrow security interests--to be a more cooperative partner in international relations. His argument will be widely read and is sure to provoke the critics-- but it is too carefully conceived and documented to dismiss."--Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia

Synopsis:

"This book is most significant for theoretical, empirical, and political reasons. Theoretically, it explores in detail micromechanisms of socialization, moving way beyond the traditional rationalist-constructivist divide. Empirically, the book demonstrates that even China changes through socialization in international institutions. The political conclusions are obvious: Keep socializing China rather than balancing!"--Thomas Risse, Freie Universität Berlin

"This eagerly awaited book offers the most compelling analysis for China's 'peaceful rise' that I know of. Iain Johnston displays a complete mastery of international relations theory, a profound knowledge of Chinese foreign policy and East Asian regionalism, and impressive control over modern social science methods. For many years to come this will be the landmark study of one of the most important developments in contemporary world politics."--Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

"Iain Johnston's Social States is a must-read for all students of international relations theory, international institutions, and international security. With his characteristic hardheaded and systematically minded approach to the big debates in international relations, Johnston has produced the single-best statement regarding socialization in contemporary global affairs. And his deep knowledge of China and institutional institutions allows him to address some of the most critical questions regarding the future global order."--Michael Barnett, University of Minnesota

"This is a timely, compelling, and deeply impressive piece of scholarship by one of the very best world-class international scholars writing on Chinese foreign policy and international relations theory today. The vividness of the writing, combined with coherent organization and dispassionate empirical analysis, are certain to make this an essential work for seasoned China watchers. At the same time, the book's bold and analytically arresting observations will compel policymakers to question their personal assumptions and hidden prejudices."--Samuel Kim, Columbia University

"In his latest first-rate work, Iain Johnston argues that, over the past twenty years, China has been socialized--often without side payments and at the expense of its narrow security interests--to be a more cooperative partner in international relations. His argument will be widely read and is sure to provoke the critics-- but it is too carefully conceived and documented to dismiss."--Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia

Synopsis:

"Constructive engagement" became a catchphrase under the Clinton administration for America's reinvigorated efforts to pull China firmly into the international community as a responsible player, one that abides by widely accepted norms. Skeptics questioned the effectiveness of this policy and those that followed. But how is such socialization supposed to work in the first place? This has never been all that clear, whether practiced by the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Japan, or the United States.

Social States is the first book to systematically test the effects of socialization in international relations--to help explain why players on the world stage may be moved to cooperate when doing so is not in their material power interests. Alastair Iain Johnston carries out his groundbreaking theoretical task through a richly detailed look at China's participation in international security institutions during two crucial decades of the "rise of China," from 1980 to 2000. Drawing on sociology and social psychology, this book examines three microprocesses of socialization--mimicking, social influence, and persuasion--as they have played out in the attitudes of Chinese diplomats active in the Conference on Disarmament, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban, the Convention on Conventional Weapons, and the ASEAN Regional Forum. Among the key conclusions: Chinese officials in the post-Mao era adopted more cooperative and more self-constraining commitments to arms control and disarmament treaties, thanks to their increasing social interactions in international security institutions.

About the Author

Alastair Iain Johnston is the Governor James Noe and Linda Noe Laine Professor of China in World Affairs at Harvard University.

Table of Contents

Acronyms vii

Acknowledgments xi

Preface xiii

CHAPTER 1: Socialization in International Relations Theory 1

CHAPTER 2: Mimicking 45

CHAPTER 3: Social Influence 74

CHAPTER 4: Persuasion 155

CHAPTER 5: Conclusions 197

References 213

Index 241

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691134536
Author:
Johnston, Alastair Iain
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Johnston, Alastair
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
General
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
International Relations - Diplomacy
Subject:
Social interaction
Subject:
Socialization
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Asian and Asian American Studies
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
International cooperation
Subject:
Security, international
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in International History and Politics
Publication Date:
November 2007
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
26 line illus. 6 tables.
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History

Social States: China in International Institutions, 1980-2000 (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$34.25 In Stock
Product details 280 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691134536 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "This book is most significant for theoretical, empirical, and political reasons. Theoretically, it explores in detail micromechanisms of socialization, moving way beyond the traditional rationalist-constructivist divide. Empirically, the book demonstrates that even China changes through socialization in international institutions. The political conclusions are obvious: Keep socializing China rather than balancing!"--Thomas Risse, Freie Universität Berlin

"This eagerly awaited book offers the most compelling analysis for China's 'peaceful rise' that I know of. Iain Johnston displays a complete mastery of international relations theory, a profound knowledge of Chinese foreign policy and East Asian regionalism, and impressive control over modern social science methods. For many years to come this will be the landmark study of one of the most important developments in contemporary world politics."--Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

"Iain Johnston's Social States is a must-read for all students of international relations theory, international institutions, and international security. With his characteristic hardheaded and systematically minded approach to the big debates in international relations, Johnston has produced the single-best statement regarding socialization in contemporary global affairs. And his deep knowledge of China and institutional institutions allows him to address some of the most critical questions regarding the future global order."--Michael Barnett, University of Minnesota

"This is a timely, compelling, and deeply impressive piece of scholarship by one of the very best world-class international scholars writing on Chinese foreign policy and international relations theory today. The vividness of the writing, combined with coherent organization and dispassionate empirical analysis, are certain to make this an essential work for seasoned China watchers. At the same time, the book's bold and analytically arresting observations will compel policymakers to question their personal assumptions and hidden prejudices."--Samuel Kim, Columbia University

"In his latest first-rate work, Iain Johnston argues that, over the past twenty years, China has been socialized--often without side payments and at the expense of its narrow security interests--to be a more cooperative partner in international relations. His argument will be widely read and is sure to provoke the critics-- but it is too carefully conceived and documented to dismiss."--Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia

"Synopsis" by , "Constructive engagement" became a catchphrase under the Clinton administration for America's reinvigorated efforts to pull China firmly into the international community as a responsible player, one that abides by widely accepted norms. Skeptics questioned the effectiveness of this policy and those that followed. But how is such socialization supposed to work in the first place? This has never been all that clear, whether practiced by the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Japan, or the United States.

Social States is the first book to systematically test the effects of socialization in international relations--to help explain why players on the world stage may be moved to cooperate when doing so is not in their material power interests. Alastair Iain Johnston carries out his groundbreaking theoretical task through a richly detailed look at China's participation in international security institutions during two crucial decades of the "rise of China," from 1980 to 2000. Drawing on sociology and social psychology, this book examines three microprocesses of socialization--mimicking, social influence, and persuasion--as they have played out in the attitudes of Chinese diplomats active in the Conference on Disarmament, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban, the Convention on Conventional Weapons, and the ASEAN Regional Forum. Among the key conclusions: Chinese officials in the post-Mao era adopted more cooperative and more self-constraining commitments to arms control and disarmament treaties, thanks to their increasing social interactions in international security institutions.

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