No Words Wasted Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    The Powell's Playlist | January 5, 2015

    Tim Johnston: IMG The Powell's Playlist: Songs for Not Sleeping by Tim Johnston



    I once told a medical-profession-type lady that I didn't sleep well, that I awoke all through the night and was awake for hours. "What do you do... Continue »
    1. $18.17 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      Descent

      Tim Johnston 9781616203047

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$40.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
2 Remote Warehouse Russia- General Russian History

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in International History and Politics series:

The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

by

The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A decade after the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China established their formidable alliance in 1950, escalating public disagreements between them broke the international communist movement apart. In The Sino-Soviet Split, Lorenz Lüthi tells the story of this rupture, which became one of the defining events of the Cold War. Identifying the primary role of disputes over Marxist-Leninist ideology, Lüthi traces their devastating impact in sowing conflict between the two nations in the areas of economic development, party relations, and foreign policy. The source of this estrangement was Mao Zedong's ideological radicalization at a time when Soviet leaders, mainly Nikita Khrushchev, became committed to more pragmatic domestic and foreign policies.

Using a wide array of archival and documentary sources from three continents, Lüthi presents a richly detailed account of Sino-Soviet political relations in the 1950s and 1960s. He explores how Sino-Soviet relations were linked to Chinese domestic politics and to Mao's struggles with internal political rivals. Furthermore, Lüthi argues, the Sino-Soviet split had far-reaching consequences for the socialist camp and its connections to the nonaligned movement, the global Cold War, and the Vietnam War.

The Sino-Soviet Split provides a meticulous and cogent analysis of a major political fallout between two global powers, opening new areas of research for anyone interested in the history of international relations in the socialist world.

Synopsis:

"Buttressed by massive documentation from a dazzling array of international archival sources, Lorenz Lüthi examines all the issues involved in the Sino-Soviet conflict from 1956 to 1966, and he singles out ideology as the prime motive that drove these two communist giants into catastrophic division. The episodes covered in this major work unfold like a kaleidoscope, refining or correcting traditional interpretations of events during this important period. There is no doubt that this book has established itself as the yardstick by which other works will be measured."--Toshi Hasegawa, University of California, Santa Barbara

"A prodigiously researched and level-headed study of the political and diplomatic split between the Soviet and Chinese communist governments. The need to understand Chinese and Russian foreign policy both past and present remains high, and the wealth of information in this important book will be a key point of reference for students and scholars in the decades to come."--O. A. Westad, London School of Economics and Political Science

"Lorenz Lüthi has made good use of a vast quantity of declassified documents and memoirs from the former Soviet bloc, China, and Western countries and has also drawn extensively on the secondary literature. His fascinating book will be a crucial resource for all those interested in tracing how and why the USSR and China moved from alliance to bitter confrontation."--Mark Kramer, Harvard University

Synopsis:

A decade after the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China established their formidable alliance in 1950, escalating public disagreements between them broke the international communist movement apart. In The Sino-Soviet Split, Lorenz Lüthi tells the story of this rupture, which became one of the defining events of the Cold War. Identifying the primary role of disputes over Marxist-Leninist ideology, Lüthi traces their devastating impact in sowing conflict between the two nations in the areas of economic development, party relations, and foreign policy. The source of this estrangement was Mao Zedong's ideological radicalization at a time when Soviet leaders, mainly Nikita Khrushchev, became committed to more pragmatic domestic and foreign policies.

Using a wide array of archival and documentary sources from three continents, Lüthi presents a richly detailed account of Sino-Soviet political relations in the 1950s and 1960s. He explores how Sino-Soviet relations were linked to Chinese domestic politics and to Mao's struggles with internal political rivals. Furthermore, Lüthi argues, the Sino-Soviet split had far-reaching consequences for the socialist camp and its connections to the nonaligned movement, the global Cold War, and the Vietnam War.

The Sino-Soviet Split provides a meticulous and cogent analysis of a major political fallout between two global powers, opening new areas of research for anyone interested in the history of international relations in the socialist world.

About the Author

Lorenz M. Luthi is assistant professor of the history of international relations at McGill University.

Table of Contents

Maps viii

Acknowledgments xi

Abbreviations and Terms xiii

Transliteration and Diacritical Marks xix

Introduction 1

Chapter One: Historical Background, 1921-1955 19

Chapter Two: The Collapse of Socialist Unity, 1956-1957 46

Chapter Three: Mao's Challenges, 1958 80

Chapter Four: Visible Cracks, 1959 114

Chapter Five: World Revolution and the Collapse of Economic Relations, 1960 157

Chapter Six: Ambiguous Truce, 1961-1962 194

Chapter Seven: Mao Resurgent, 1962-1963 219

Chapter Eight: The American Factor, 1962-1963 246

Chapter Nine: Khrushchev's Fall and the Collapse of Party Relations, 1963-1966 273

Chapter Ten: Vietnam and the Collapse of the Military Alliance, 1964-1966 302

Conclusion 340

Essay on the Sources 353

Index 361

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691135908
Author:
Luthi, Lorenz M.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
L
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Communism
Subject:
History
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Asia - China
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Subject:
World History/Comparative History
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Asian and Asian American Studies
Subject:
Communism -- History -- 20th century.
Subject:
China Foreign relations Soviet Union.
Subject:
Russia-General Russian History
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Prin
Publication Date:
April 2008
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 tables.
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Inside the Kremlinus Cold War: From... Used Trade Paper $24.00
  2. Power and Protest : Global... Used Trade Paper $14.00
  3. The Global Cold War: Third World... New Trade Paper $31.25
  4. The Vietnam War: A Concise... Used Trade Paper $10.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Asia » China » Peoples Republic 1949 to Present
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » Leftist Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » Peace and War
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » World History » China
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » General

The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$40.95 In Stock
Product details 400 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691135908 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Buttressed by massive documentation from a dazzling array of international archival sources, Lorenz Lüthi examines all the issues involved in the Sino-Soviet conflict from 1956 to 1966, and he singles out ideology as the prime motive that drove these two communist giants into catastrophic division. The episodes covered in this major work unfold like a kaleidoscope, refining or correcting traditional interpretations of events during this important period. There is no doubt that this book has established itself as the yardstick by which other works will be measured."--Toshi Hasegawa, University of California, Santa Barbara

"A prodigiously researched and level-headed study of the political and diplomatic split between the Soviet and Chinese communist governments. The need to understand Chinese and Russian foreign policy both past and present remains high, and the wealth of information in this important book will be a key point of reference for students and scholars in the decades to come."--O. A. Westad, London School of Economics and Political Science

"Lorenz Lüthi has made good use of a vast quantity of declassified documents and memoirs from the former Soviet bloc, China, and Western countries and has also drawn extensively on the secondary literature. His fascinating book will be a crucial resource for all those interested in tracing how and why the USSR and China moved from alliance to bitter confrontation."--Mark Kramer, Harvard University

"Synopsis" by , A decade after the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China established their formidable alliance in 1950, escalating public disagreements between them broke the international communist movement apart. In The Sino-Soviet Split, Lorenz Lüthi tells the story of this rupture, which became one of the defining events of the Cold War. Identifying the primary role of disputes over Marxist-Leninist ideology, Lüthi traces their devastating impact in sowing conflict between the two nations in the areas of economic development, party relations, and foreign policy. The source of this estrangement was Mao Zedong's ideological radicalization at a time when Soviet leaders, mainly Nikita Khrushchev, became committed to more pragmatic domestic and foreign policies.

Using a wide array of archival and documentary sources from three continents, Lüthi presents a richly detailed account of Sino-Soviet political relations in the 1950s and 1960s. He explores how Sino-Soviet relations were linked to Chinese domestic politics and to Mao's struggles with internal political rivals. Furthermore, Lüthi argues, the Sino-Soviet split had far-reaching consequences for the socialist camp and its connections to the nonaligned movement, the global Cold War, and the Vietnam War.

The Sino-Soviet Split provides a meticulous and cogent analysis of a major political fallout between two global powers, opening new areas of research for anyone interested in the history of international relations in the socialist world.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.