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Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology series:

Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)

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Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Social movement scholars have slowly begun to explore the rich topic of culture and contention. With this wonderful book, Roy breaks important new ground by looking beyond the culture of a given movement to explore the social relations by which movements do culture and with what effects. The argument he puts forward, from examining the Old Left and Civil Rights Movement, is both convincing and important."--Doug McAdam, Stanford University

"This exceptional book provides one of the most grounded sociological accounts of music and its role in social movements to date. Integrating insights from the sociology of culture, music, and organizations with in-depth historical analyses of American folk traditions, Reds, Whites and Blues is both theoretically astute and innovative. It is a must-read, with implications for many specialties in our field."--Vincent Roscigno, Ohio State University

"In this revealing and incisive book, Roy shows how folk music inhabited two transformative moments of American social history in very different ways. Turning from how movements emerge to what they do, he demonstrates how music both reflects and reshapes the relations between movement leaders and militants. Some movements, his book shows, use music as a weapon of propaganda; others as a means of creating solidarity. Students of movements and American history will never again be able to sideline music as a mere ornament of social movement studies."--Sidney Tarrow, Cornell University

Synopsis:

"Social movement scholars have slowly begun to explore the rich topic of culture and contention. With this wonderful book, Roy breaks important new ground by looking beyond the culture of a given movement to explore the social relations by which movements do culture and with what effects. The argument he puts forward, from examining the Old Left and Civil Rights Movement, is both convincing and important."--Doug McAdam, Stanford University

"This exceptional book provides one of the most grounded sociological accounts of music and its role in social movements to date. Integrating insights from the sociology of culture, music, and organizations with in-depth historical analyses of American folk traditions, Reds, Whites and Blues is both theoretically astute and innovative. It is a must-read, with implications for many specialties in our field."--Vincent Roscigno, Ohio State University

"In this revealing and incisive book, Roy shows how folk music inhabited two transformative moments of American social history in very different ways. Turning from how movements emerge to what they do, he demonstrates how music both reflects and reshapes the relations between movement leaders and militants. Some movements, his book shows, use music as a weapon of propaganda; others as a means of creating solidarity. Students of movements and American history will never again be able to sideline music as a mere ornament of social movement studies."--Sidney Tarrow, Cornell University

Synopsis:

Music, and folk music in particular, is often embraced as a form of political expression, a vehicle for bridging or reinforcing social boundaries, and a valuable tool for movements reconfiguring the social landscape. Reds, Whites, and Blues examines the political force of folk music, not through the meaning of its lyrics, but through the concrete social activities that make up movements. Drawing from rich archival material, William Roy shows that the People's Songs movement of the 1930s and 40s, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s implemented folk music's social relationships--specifically between those who sang and those who listened--in different ways, achieving different outcomes.

Roy explores how the People's Songsters envisioned uniting people in song, but made little headway beyond leftist activists. In contrast, the Civil Rights Movement successfully integrated music into collective action, and used music on the picket lines, at sit-ins, on freedom rides, and in jails. Roy considers how the movement's Freedom Songs never gained commercial success, yet contributed to the wider achievements of the Civil Rights struggle. Roy also traces the history of folk music, revealing the complex debates surrounding who or what qualified as "folk" and how the music's status as racially inclusive was not always a given.

Examining folk music's galvanizing and unifying power, Reds, Whites, and Blues casts new light on the relationship between cultural forms and social activity.

About the Author

William G. Roy is professor and chair of the sociology department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of "Socializing Capital" (Princeton) and "Making Societies".

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Chapter One: Social Movements, Music, and Race 1
Chapter Two: Music and Boundaries: Race and Folk 28
Chapter Three: The Original Folk Project 49
Chapter Four: White and Black Reds: Building an Infrastructure 79
Chapter Five: Movement Entrepreneurs and Activists 100
Chapter Six: Organizing Music: The Fruits of Entrepreneurship 126
Chapter Seven: The Highlander School 155
Chapter Eight: Music at the Heart of the Quintessential Social Movement 181
Chapter Nine: A Movement Splintered 213
Chapter Ten: How Social Movements Do Culture 234
Appendix: Coding of Songbooks and Song Anthologies 251
Notes 253
References 263
Index 277

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691143637
Author:
Roy, William G.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Political Advocacy
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Folk & Traditional
Subject:
Social movements -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Folk music - Political aspects -
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Music
Copyright:
Series:
Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology
Publication Date:
July 2010
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 tables.
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » American Folk
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Folk » Folk and Traditional
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Reds, Whites, and Blues: Social Movements, Folk Music, and Race in the United States (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$47.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691143637 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Social movement scholars have slowly begun to explore the rich topic of culture and contention. With this wonderful book, Roy breaks important new ground by looking beyond the culture of a given movement to explore the social relations by which movements do culture and with what effects. The argument he puts forward, from examining the Old Left and Civil Rights Movement, is both convincing and important."--Doug McAdam, Stanford University

"This exceptional book provides one of the most grounded sociological accounts of music and its role in social movements to date. Integrating insights from the sociology of culture, music, and organizations with in-depth historical analyses of American folk traditions, Reds, Whites and Blues is both theoretically astute and innovative. It is a must-read, with implications for many specialties in our field."--Vincent Roscigno, Ohio State University

"In this revealing and incisive book, Roy shows how folk music inhabited two transformative moments of American social history in very different ways. Turning from how movements emerge to what they do, he demonstrates how music both reflects and reshapes the relations between movement leaders and militants. Some movements, his book shows, use music as a weapon of propaganda; others as a means of creating solidarity. Students of movements and American history will never again be able to sideline music as a mere ornament of social movement studies."--Sidney Tarrow, Cornell University

"Synopsis" by , Music, and folk music in particular, is often embraced as a form of political expression, a vehicle for bridging or reinforcing social boundaries, and a valuable tool for movements reconfiguring the social landscape. Reds, Whites, and Blues examines the political force of folk music, not through the meaning of its lyrics, but through the concrete social activities that make up movements. Drawing from rich archival material, William Roy shows that the People's Songs movement of the 1930s and 40s, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s implemented folk music's social relationships--specifically between those who sang and those who listened--in different ways, achieving different outcomes.

Roy explores how the People's Songsters envisioned uniting people in song, but made little headway beyond leftist activists. In contrast, the Civil Rights Movement successfully integrated music into collective action, and used music on the picket lines, at sit-ins, on freedom rides, and in jails. Roy considers how the movement's Freedom Songs never gained commercial success, yet contributed to the wider achievements of the Civil Rights struggle. Roy also traces the history of folk music, revealing the complex debates surrounding who or what qualified as "folk" and how the music's status as racially inclusive was not always a given.

Examining folk music's galvanizing and unifying power, Reds, Whites, and Blues casts new light on the relationship between cultural forms and social activity.

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