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Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology series:

Framing Europe: Attitudes to European Integration in Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This book provides a major empirical analysis of differing attitudes to European integration in three of Europe's most important countries: Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom. From its beginnings, the European Union has resounded with debate over whether to move toward a federal or intergovernmental system. However, Juan Díez Medrano argues that empirical analyses of support for integration--by specialists in international relations, comparative politics, and survey research--have failed to explain why some countries lean toward federalism whereas others lean toward intergovernmentalism.

By applying frame analysis to a unique set of primary sources (in-depth interviews, newspaper articles, novels, history texts, political speeches, and survey data), Díez Medrano demonstrates the role of major historical events in transforming national cultures and thus creating new opportunities for political transformation. Clearly written and rigorously argued, Framing Europe explains differences in support for European integration between the three countries studied in light of the degree to which each realized its particular "supranational project" outside Western Europe. Only the United Kingdom succeeded in consolidating an empire and retaining it after World War II, while Germany and Spain each abandoned their corresponding aspirations. These differences meant that these countries' populations developed different degrees of identification as Europeans and, partly in consequence, different degrees of support for the building of a federal Europe.

Synopsis:

This book provides a major empirical analysis of differing attitudes to European integration in three of Europe's most important countries: Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom. From its beginnings, the European Union has resounded with debate over whether to move toward a federal or intergovernmental system. However, Juan Díez Medrano argues that empirical analyses of support for integration--by specialists in international relations, comparative politics, and survey research--have failed to explain why some countries lean toward federalism whereas others lean toward intergovernmentalism.

By applying frame analysis to a unique set of primary sources (in-depth interviews, newspaper articles, novels, history texts, political speeches, and survey data), Díez Medrano demonstrates the role of major historical events in transforming national cultures and thus creating new opportunities for political transformation. Clearly written and rigorously argued, Framing Europe explains differences in support for European integration between the three countries studied in light of the degree to which each realized its particular "supranational project" outside Western Europe. Only the United Kingdom succeeded in consolidating an empire and retaining it after World War II, while Germany and Spain each abandoned their corresponding aspirations. These differences meant that these countries' populations developed different degrees of identification as Europeans and, partly in consequence, different degrees of support for the building of a federal Europe.

Synopsis:

"This book is a scholarly tour de force. There is nothing comparable that I know of. The richness of the data is unsurpassed, and the contextual knowledge of Spain, Germany, and Britain is superb. The book is logically organized, and the writing is clear. It is what scholarship should be all about but only rarely is these days: careful, in-depth work on an important question, displaying an intellect in full control of the material."--Peter Katzenstein, Cornell University, author of Tamed Power: Germany in Europe

"This is a genuinely groundbreaking work. It is to my knowledge the very first study by a comparative historical sociologist of contemporary attitudes to European integration in different European nations. It is a serious, thorough, extensively researched project, remarkably at ease with the different national contexts, histories, and languages it handles. The field of European studies--where there is a feeble amount of good sociology on the subject--greatly needs this kind of work."--Adrian Favell, University of California, Los Angeles, author of Philosophies of Integration

About the Author

Juan Díez Medrano is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of "Divided Nations: Class, Politics, and Nationalism in the Basque Country and Catalonia".

Table of Contents

List of Figures ix

List of Tables xi

Acknowledgments xiii

One

Introduction 1

PART I: FRAMES ON EUROPEAN INTEGRATION AND THE EUROPEAN UNION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, GERMANY, AND SPAIN 19

Two

Ways of Seeing European Integration 21

Three

Good Reasons for and Attitudes toward European Integration 65

Four

Journalists and European Integration 106

PART II: NATIONAL CULTURES AND FRAMES ON EUROPEAN INTEGRATION 157

Five

Spain: Europe as a Mirror with Two Reflections 159

Six

West Germany: Between Self-Doubt and Pragmatism 179

Seven

East Germany: A Different Past, a Different Memory 200

Eight

The United Kingdom: Reluctant Europeans 214

Nine

Frames and Attitudes toward European Integration: A Statistical Validation 236

Ten

Conclusions 249

Appendix 1

Selection and Distribution of Respondents, and the Interviewing Process 263

Appendix 2

Newspaper Selection, Sampling, and Coding Procedures for Editorials and Opinion Pieces 267

Appendix 3

Frames on European Integration: A Discriminant Analysis, by City 270

Appendix 4

Sources for Part II: Novels, History Textbooks, and Head of State Addresses 271

Notes 277

References 299

Index 315

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691146508
Author:
Medrano, Juan Diez
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Dez Medrano, Juan
Author:
Medrano, Juan Dez
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology
Publication Date:
March 2010
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
5 line illus. 14 tables.
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Framing Europe: Attitudes to European Integration in Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom (Princeton Studies in Cultural Sociology) New Trade Paper
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Product details 344 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691146508 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This book provides a major empirical analysis of differing attitudes to European integration in three of Europe's most important countries: Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom. From its beginnings, the European Union has resounded with debate over whether to move toward a federal or intergovernmental system. However, Juan Díez Medrano argues that empirical analyses of support for integration--by specialists in international relations, comparative politics, and survey research--have failed to explain why some countries lean toward federalism whereas others lean toward intergovernmentalism.

By applying frame analysis to a unique set of primary sources (in-depth interviews, newspaper articles, novels, history texts, political speeches, and survey data), Díez Medrano demonstrates the role of major historical events in transforming national cultures and thus creating new opportunities for political transformation. Clearly written and rigorously argued, Framing Europe explains differences in support for European integration between the three countries studied in light of the degree to which each realized its particular "supranational project" outside Western Europe. Only the United Kingdom succeeded in consolidating an empire and retaining it after World War II, while Germany and Spain each abandoned their corresponding aspirations. These differences meant that these countries' populations developed different degrees of identification as Europeans and, partly in consequence, different degrees of support for the building of a federal Europe.

"Synopsis" by ,

"This book is a scholarly tour de force. There is nothing comparable that I know of. The richness of the data is unsurpassed, and the contextual knowledge of Spain, Germany, and Britain is superb. The book is logically organized, and the writing is clear. It is what scholarship should be all about but only rarely is these days: careful, in-depth work on an important question, displaying an intellect in full control of the material."--Peter Katzenstein, Cornell University, author of Tamed Power: Germany in Europe

"This is a genuinely groundbreaking work. It is to my knowledge the very first study by a comparative historical sociologist of contemporary attitudes to European integration in different European nations. It is a serious, thorough, extensively researched project, remarkably at ease with the different national contexts, histories, and languages it handles. The field of European studies--where there is a feeble amount of good sociology on the subject--greatly needs this kind of work."--Adrian Favell, University of California, Los Angeles, author of Philosophies of Integration

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