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Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica (Bollingen Series)

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Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica (Bollingen Series) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Picasso and Truth offers a breathtaking and original new look at the most significant artist of the modern era. From Pablo Picasso's early The Blue Room to the later Guernica, eminent art historian T. J. Clark offers a striking reassessment of the artist's paintings from the 1920s and 1930s. Why was the space of a room so basic to Picasso's worldview? And what happened to his art when he began to feel that room-space become too confined--too little exposed to the catastrophes of the twentieth century? Clark explores the role of space and the interior, and the battle between intimacy and monstrosity, in Picasso's art. Based on the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts delivered at the National Gallery of Art, this lavishly illustrated volume remedies the biographical and idolatrous tendencies of most studies on Picasso, reasserting the structure and substance of the artist's work.

With compelling insight, Clark focuses on three central works--the large-scale Guitar and Mandolin on a Table (1924), The Three Dancers (1925), and The Painter and His Model (1927)--and explores Picasso's answer to Nietzsche's belief that the age-old commitment to truth was imploding in modern European culture. Masterful in its historical contextualization, Picasso and Truth rescues Picasso from the celebrity culture that trivializes his accomplishments and returns us to the tragic vision of his art--humane and appalling, naïve and difficult, in mourning for a lost nineteenth century, yet utterly exposed to the hell of Europe between the wars.

Review:

"This masterful volume reproduces six lectures that U.C. Berkeley emeritus art historian Clark (Farewell to an Idea) gave at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in 2009 as part of the prestigious Mellon Lecture series. The renowned scholar (and member of Retort, a Bay-area-based collective of radical leftist writers and thinkers) tracks Picasso's work from the 1920s through the '30s with gusto and precision, culminating in a close look at the 1937 masterpiece, Guernica. Clark entertainingly derides the bulk of writing about Picasso as 'second-rate celebrity literature' that slavishly recounts the titillating parts of the painter's biography while largely ignoring his monumentally important work. Distinguishing himself from that pack by discussing drawings and paintings, both famous and obscure, Clark argues that a ubiquitous 'grimness' underlies the exuberant sex and violence Picasso portrayed during these years — years that saw the rise of all manner of real-life 'monsters' in Europe. Clark argues that Picasso's flight from Cubism and Nietzschean spirit allowed the artist to express Europe's suffering between WWI and WWII, while later monsters, bathers, and Guernica allowed him to grasp an inner truth about life and existence. In making the case, Clark details a number of stages in Picasso's work, always in exquisite prose. These include the painter's early 1920s nudes; Guitar and Mandolin on a Table (1924); Three Dancers (1925); and Painter and Model (1927). This satisfyingly rigorous book is grounded in Picasso's paintings and drawings throughout. 208 illus. Agent: Wendy Weil Agency. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

"No art historian in our time has had a greater impact both within the field and beyond it than T. J. Clark. Everything he writes matters in the most fundamental way. His latest book, Picasso and Truth, is no exception--superbly observed, beautifully argued, a tour de force of looking, thinking, and writing."--Michael Fried, author of The Moment of Caravaggio

"This is the Picasso book for which we have all been waiting. This work displaces biographical and psychological treatments of the artist from the past several decades, rendering them obsolete--and it forever changes art history in its present disposition."--Rosalind E. Krauss, Columbia University

Synopsis:

Picasso and Truth offers a breathtaking and original new look at the most significant artist of the modern era. From Pablo Picasso's early The Blue Room to the later Guernica, eminent art historian T. J. Clark offers a striking reassessment of the artist's paintings from the 1920s and 1930s. Why was the space of a room so basic to Picasso's worldview? And what happened to his art when he began to feel that room-space become too confined--too little exposed to the catastrophes of the twentieth century? Clark explores the role of space and the interior, and the battle between intimacy and monstrosity, in Picasso's art. Based on the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts delivered at the National Gallery of Art, this lavishly illustrated volume remedies the biographical and idolatrous tendencies of most studies on Picasso, reasserting the structure and substance of the artist's work.

With compelling insight, Clark focuses on three central works--the large-scale Guitar and Mandolin on a Table (1924), The Three Dancers (1925), and The Painter and His Model (1927)--and explores Picasso's answer to Nietzsche's belief that the age-old commitment to truth was imploding in modern European culture. Masterful in its historical contextualization, Picasso and Truth rescues Picasso from the celebrity culture that trivializes his accomplishments and returns us to the tragic vision of his art--humane and appalling, naïve and difficult, in mourning for a lost nineteenth century, yet utterly exposed to the hell of Europe between the wars.

About the Author

T. J. Clark is professor emeritus of modern art at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of many books, including "The Sight of Death", "Farewell to an Idea", and "The Painting of Modern Life" (Princeton). In 2006, he received the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Lecture 1 Object 23

Lecture 2 Room 59

Lecture 3 Window 111

Lecture 4 Monster 147

Lecture 5 Monument 191

Lecture 6 Mural 235

Acknowledgments 285

Notes 289

Photography and Copyright Credits 311

Index 319

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691157412
Author:
Clark, Timothy J.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Clark, T. J.
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
Art-Theory and Criticism
Subject:
Art and architecture
Subject:
European History
Subject:
Art
Series:
The A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
95 Color illus. 80 halftones.
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

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Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica (Bollingen Series) New Hardcover
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$45.00 In Stock
Product details 344 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691157412 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This masterful volume reproduces six lectures that U.C. Berkeley emeritus art historian Clark (Farewell to an Idea) gave at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in 2009 as part of the prestigious Mellon Lecture series. The renowned scholar (and member of Retort, a Bay-area-based collective of radical leftist writers and thinkers) tracks Picasso's work from the 1920s through the '30s with gusto and precision, culminating in a close look at the 1937 masterpiece, Guernica. Clark entertainingly derides the bulk of writing about Picasso as 'second-rate celebrity literature' that slavishly recounts the titillating parts of the painter's biography while largely ignoring his monumentally important work. Distinguishing himself from that pack by discussing drawings and paintings, both famous and obscure, Clark argues that a ubiquitous 'grimness' underlies the exuberant sex and violence Picasso portrayed during these years — years that saw the rise of all manner of real-life 'monsters' in Europe. Clark argues that Picasso's flight from Cubism and Nietzschean spirit allowed the artist to express Europe's suffering between WWI and WWII, while later monsters, bathers, and Guernica allowed him to grasp an inner truth about life and existence. In making the case, Clark details a number of stages in Picasso's work, always in exquisite prose. These include the painter's early 1920s nudes; Guitar and Mandolin on a Table (1924); Three Dancers (1925); and Painter and Model (1927). This satisfyingly rigorous book is grounded in Picasso's paintings and drawings throughout. 208 illus. Agent: Wendy Weil Agency. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , "No art historian in our time has had a greater impact both within the field and beyond it than T. J. Clark. Everything he writes matters in the most fundamental way. His latest book, Picasso and Truth, is no exception--superbly observed, beautifully argued, a tour de force of looking, thinking, and writing."--Michael Fried, author of The Moment of Caravaggio

"This is the Picasso book for which we have all been waiting. This work displaces biographical and psychological treatments of the artist from the past several decades, rendering them obsolete--and it forever changes art history in its present disposition."--Rosalind E. Krauss, Columbia University

"Synopsis" by , Picasso and Truth offers a breathtaking and original new look at the most significant artist of the modern era. From Pablo Picasso's early The Blue Room to the later Guernica, eminent art historian T. J. Clark offers a striking reassessment of the artist's paintings from the 1920s and 1930s. Why was the space of a room so basic to Picasso's worldview? And what happened to his art when he began to feel that room-space become too confined--too little exposed to the catastrophes of the twentieth century? Clark explores the role of space and the interior, and the battle between intimacy and monstrosity, in Picasso's art. Based on the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts delivered at the National Gallery of Art, this lavishly illustrated volume remedies the biographical and idolatrous tendencies of most studies on Picasso, reasserting the structure and substance of the artist's work.

With compelling insight, Clark focuses on three central works--the large-scale Guitar and Mandolin on a Table (1924), The Three Dancers (1925), and The Painter and His Model (1927)--and explores Picasso's answer to Nietzsche's belief that the age-old commitment to truth was imploding in modern European culture. Masterful in its historical contextualization, Picasso and Truth rescues Picasso from the celebrity culture that trivializes his accomplishments and returns us to the tragic vision of his art--humane and appalling, naïve and difficult, in mourning for a lost nineteenth century, yet utterly exposed to the hell of Europe between the wars.

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