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Other titles in the Landmark Law Cases & American Society series:

Mendez V. Westminster: School Desegregation and Mexican-American Rights (Landmark Law Cases & American Society)

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Mendez V. Westminster: School Desegregation and Mexican-American Rights (Landmark Law Cases & American Society) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

While Brown v. Board of Education remains much more famous, Mendez v. Westminster School District (1947) was actually the first case in which segregation in education was successfully challenged in federal court. Finally giving Mendez its due, Philippa Strum provides a concise and compelling account of its legal issues and legacy, while retaining its essential human face: that of Mexican Americans unwilling to accept second-class citizenship. 1945 Gonzalo and Felcitas Mendez, California farmers, sent their children off to the local school, only to be told that the youngsters would have to attend a separate facility reserved for Mexican Americans. In response the Mndezes and other aggrieved parents from nearby school districts went to federal court to challenge the segregation. Uniquely, they did not claim racial discrimination, since Mexicans were legally considered white, but rather discrimination based on ancestry and supposed "language deficiency" that denied their children their Fourteenth Amendment rights to equal protection under the law.

In 1945 Gonzalo and Felicitas Mendez, California farmers, sent their children off to the local school, only to be told that the youngsters would have to attend a separate facility reserved for Mexican Americans. In response the Mendezes and other aggrieved parents from nearby school districts went to federal court to challenge the segregation. Uniquely, they did not claim racial discrimination, since Mexicans were legally considered white, but rather discrimination based on ancestry and supposed "language deficiency" that denied their children their Fourteenth Amendment rights to equal protection under the law.

Strum tells how, thanks to attorney David Marcus's carefully crafted arguments, federal district court judge Paul McCormick came to support the plaintiffs on the grounds that the social, psychological, and pedagogical costs of segregated education were damaging to Mexican-American children. The school districts claimed that federal courts had no jurisdiction over education, but the Ninth Circuit upheld McCormick's decision, ruling that the schools' actions violated California law. The appeal to the Ninth Circuit was supported by amicus briefs from leading civil liberties organizations, including the NAACP, which a few years later would adapt the arguments of Mendez in representing the plaintiffs in Brown.

Strum effectively weaves together narrative and analysis with personality portraits to create a highly readable and accessible story, allowing us to hear the voices of all the protagonists. She also presents the issues evenhandedly, effectively balancing her presentation of arguments by both the plaintiffs and the schools that sought to continue the segregation of Mexican-American students.

Ultimately, Mendez highlights how Mexican Americans took the lead to secure their civil rights and demonstrates how organization, courage, and persistence in the Mexican-American communities could overcome the racism of the school boards. Their inspiring example is particularly timely given the current controversies over immigration and the growing national interest in Latino life.

Synopsis:

A readable and enlightening summary of the first federal court case in which segregation in education was directly challenged as inherently unequal. Provides a concise and compelling account of its legal issues and legacy, while retaining its essential human face: that of Mexican-Americans unwilling to accept second-class citizenship.

Table of Contents

Contents

Editors' Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Mexican-Americans in California

2. From Lemon Grove to the Zoot Suit Riots

3. The Parents Decide to Sue

4. Race, Ethnicity, and Trial Strategies

5. The Trial Begins

6. "We Always Tell Our Children They Are Americans"

7. The Experts Testify

8. Judge McCormick Decides

9. From the Court of Appeals to the State Legislature

Epilogue

Cases Cited

Chronology

Bibliographic Essay

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780700617197
Author:
Strum, Philippa
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas
Subject:
Legal History
Subject:
Constitutional
Subject:
Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice
Subject:
Discrimination in education
Subject:
Segregation in education
Subject:
Law : General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Landmark Law Cases & American Society
Publication Date:
20100431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
8.30x5.50x.50 in. .60 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Education » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Hispanic American Studies
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference

Mendez V. Westminster: School Desegregation and Mexican-American Rights (Landmark Law Cases & American Society) New Trade Paper
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Product details 200 pages University Press of Kansas - English 9780700617197 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A readable and enlightening summary of the first federal court case in which segregation in education was directly challenged as inherently unequal. Provides a concise and compelling account of its legal issues and legacy, while retaining its essential human face: that of Mexican-Americans unwilling to accept second-class citizenship.
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