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Moral Disorder: And Other Stories

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Moral Disorder: And Other Stories Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Atwood triumphs with these dazzling, personal stories in her first collection since Wilderness Tips.

In these ten interrelated stories Atwood traces the course of a life and also the lives intertwined with it, while evoking the drama and the humour that colour common experiences — the birth of a baby, divorce and remarriage, old age and death. With settings ranging from Toronto, northern Quebec, and rural Ontario, the stories begin in the present, as a couple no longer young situate themselves in a larger world no longer safe. Then the narrative goes back in time to the forties and moves chronologically forward toward the present.

In “The Art of Cooking and Serving,” the twelve-year-old narrator does her best to accommodate the arrival of a baby sister. After she boldly declares her independence, we follow the narrator into young adulthood and then through a complex relationship. In “The Entities,” the story of two women haunted by the past unfolds. The magnificent last two stories reveal the heartbreaking old age of parents but circle back again to childhood, to complete the cycle.

By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, Moral Disorder displays Atwoods celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. This is vintage Atwood, writing at the height of her powers.

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

Margaret Atwood has" "frequently been cited as one of the foremost writers of our time. MORAL DISORDER, her moving new book of fiction, could be seen either as a collection of ten stories that is almost a novel or as a novel broken up into ten stories. It resembles a photograph album--a series of clearly observed moments that trace the course of a life, and also the lives intertwined with it--those of parents, of siblings, of children, of friends, of enemies, of teachers, and even of animals. And as in an album, times change: the 30s, the 40s, the 50s, the 60s, the 70s and 80s, the present time--all are here. The settings are equally varied: large cities, suburbs, farms, northern forests.

The first story, "The Bad News," is set in the present, as a couple no longer young situate themselves in a larger world no longer safe. The narrative then switches time as the central character moves through childhood and adolescence in "The Art of Cooking and Serving," "The Headless Horseman," and "My Last Duchess." We follow her into young adulthood in "The Other Place," and then through a complex relationship, traced in three of the stories: "Monopoly," "Moral Disorder," and "The Entities." The last two stories, "The Labrador Fiasco" and "The Boys at the Lab," deal with the heartbreaking old age of parents but circle back again to childhood, to complete the cycle.

By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, MORAL DISORDER displays Atwood's celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. As "The New York Times" has said, "The reader has the sense that Atwood has complete access to her people's emotional histories, complete understanding of their hearts and imaginations."

Synopsis:

This collection of ten stories is almost a novel--by turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal--displaying Atwood's celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. Unabridged. 7 CDs.

About the Author

Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780739340516
Publisher:
Random House Audio Assets
Subject:
Literary
Read by:
Denaker, Susan
Read:
Denaker, Susan
Author:
Atwood, Margaret
Author:
Denaker, Susan
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Six CD
Publication Date:
20060931
Binding:
COMPACT DISC
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Dimensions:
6.4 x 5.5 x 1 in 0.4 lb
Media Run Time:
480

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Moral Disorder: And Other Stories
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details pages Random House Audio Assets - English 9780739340516 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Margaret Atwood has" "frequently been cited as one of the foremost writers of our time. MORAL DISORDER, her moving new book of fiction, could be seen either as a collection of ten stories that is almost a novel or as a novel broken up into ten stories. It resembles a photograph album--a series of clearly observed moments that trace the course of a life, and also the lives intertwined with it--those of parents, of siblings, of children, of friends, of enemies, of teachers, and even of animals. And as in an album, times change: the 30s, the 40s, the 50s, the 60s, the 70s and 80s, the present time--all are here. The settings are equally varied: large cities, suburbs, farms, northern forests.

The first story, "The Bad News," is set in the present, as a couple no longer young situate themselves in a larger world no longer safe. The narrative then switches time as the central character moves through childhood and adolescence in "The Art of Cooking and Serving," "The Headless Horseman," and "My Last Duchess." We follow her into young adulthood in "The Other Place," and then through a complex relationship, traced in three of the stories: "Monopoly," "Moral Disorder," and "The Entities." The last two stories, "The Labrador Fiasco" and "The Boys at the Lab," deal with the heartbreaking old age of parents but circle back again to childhood, to complete the cycle.

By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, MORAL DISORDER displays Atwood's celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. As "The New York Times" has said, "The reader has the sense that Atwood has complete access to her people's emotional histories, complete understanding of their hearts and imaginations."

"Synopsis" by , This collection of ten stories is almost a novel--by turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal--displaying Atwood's celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. Unabridged. 7 CDs.

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