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Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »
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The Telephone Booth Indian

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The Telephone Booth Indian Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A classic work on Broadway sharpers, grifters, and con men by the late, great New Yorker journalist A. J. Liebling.

Often referred to as “Liebling lowlife pieces,” the essays in The Telephone Booth Indian boisterously celebrate raffishness. A. J. Liebling appreciated a good scam and knew how to cultivate the scammers. Telephone Booth Indians (entrepreneurs so impecunious that they conduct business from telephone booths in the lobbies of New York City office buildings) and a host of other petty nomads of Broadway—with names like Marty the Clutch and Count de Pennies—are the protagonists in this incomparable Liebling work. In The Telephone Booth Indian, Liebling proves just why he was the go-to man on New York lowlife and con culture; this is the master at the top of his form, uncovering scam after scam and writing about them with the wit and charisma that established him as one of the greatest journalists of his generation and one of New Yorks finest cultural chroniclers.

Review:

"In its homage to America's most rakish hucksters, Broadway's 'Library of Larceny' series reissues this collection of irreverent 'low-life' pieces penned by Liebling, a mid-century fixture at the New Yorker renowned for his intimacy with con culture. Originally published in 1942, this sinewy compendium opens the door to the gritty underworld of grifters, showmen and hustlers from a bygone era of deadpan humor, decadent bonhomie and vigorous one-upmanship. With affectionate aplomb, Liebling introduces us to the colorful if unscrupulous denizens of Broadway's Jollity Building, whose names alone are reminiscent of Garbage Pail Kids: Paddy the Booster, Acid Test Ike, Lotsandlots, Judge Horumph, Count de Pennies and Marty the Clutch (so named for his 'custom of mangling people's fingers when he shakes hands with them'). The 'telephone booth Indians' moniker refers to promoters so pressed for cash that they must conduct their wheeling and dealing from one of the lobby's eight coin-box phone booths. While it's riveting to learn about the humble, hardscrabble beginnings of the Shubert (yes, as in theater) brothers, what's most memorable about this masterpiece is the nostalgia Liebling evokes in his reader for larger-than-life characters such as the sartorial peacock Roy Wilson Howard, a newsman whose self-control on the telephone Liebling irresistibly likens to that 'of a fat woman waving away a tray of chocolate éclairs.' With a foreword by critic and Low Life author Luc Sante. " Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In "The Telephone Booth Indian," Liebling proves just why he was the go-to man on New York lowlife and con culture; this is the master at the top of his form, uncovering scam after scam and writing about them with the wit and charisma that established him as one of New York's finest cultural chroniclers.

About the Author

A. J. LIEBLING joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1935 and stayed there until his death in 1963. His many books include The Earl of Louisiana, Back Where I Came From, Between Meals, and The Sweet Science, which was recently voted the finest sports book of all time.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780767917360
Author:
Liebling, A. J.
Publisher:
Broadway Books
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Other Miscellaneous Crimes
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Entrepreneurship
Subject:
Businesspeople
Subject:
Swindlers and swindling
Subject:
General True Crime
Subject:
Anthologies-Essays
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Library of Larceny
Series Volume:
no 2
Publication Date:
20040731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.00x5.16x.62 in. .51 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Essays
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime

The Telephone Booth Indian New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.00 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Broadway Books - English 9780767917360 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In its homage to America's most rakish hucksters, Broadway's 'Library of Larceny' series reissues this collection of irreverent 'low-life' pieces penned by Liebling, a mid-century fixture at the New Yorker renowned for his intimacy with con culture. Originally published in 1942, this sinewy compendium opens the door to the gritty underworld of grifters, showmen and hustlers from a bygone era of deadpan humor, decadent bonhomie and vigorous one-upmanship. With affectionate aplomb, Liebling introduces us to the colorful if unscrupulous denizens of Broadway's Jollity Building, whose names alone are reminiscent of Garbage Pail Kids: Paddy the Booster, Acid Test Ike, Lotsandlots, Judge Horumph, Count de Pennies and Marty the Clutch (so named for his 'custom of mangling people's fingers when he shakes hands with them'). The 'telephone booth Indians' moniker refers to promoters so pressed for cash that they must conduct their wheeling and dealing from one of the lobby's eight coin-box phone booths. While it's riveting to learn about the humble, hardscrabble beginnings of the Shubert (yes, as in theater) brothers, what's most memorable about this masterpiece is the nostalgia Liebling evokes in his reader for larger-than-life characters such as the sartorial peacock Roy Wilson Howard, a newsman whose self-control on the telephone Liebling irresistibly likens to that 'of a fat woman waving away a tray of chocolate éclairs.' With a foreword by critic and Low Life author Luc Sante. " Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , In "The Telephone Booth Indian," Liebling proves just why he was the go-to man on New York lowlife and con culture; this is the master at the top of his form, uncovering scam after scam and writing about them with the wit and charisma that established him as one of New York's finest cultural chroniclers.
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