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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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1 Burnside Reference- Grammar and Style

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better And/Or Worse

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When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better And/Or Worse Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

< p> What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book< i> .< /i> < /p> < p> In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since < i> School House Rock< /i> have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read < i> If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It < /i> and: < i> < br> < /i> < br> Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (& #8220; If you catch an adjective, kill it& #8221; ), Stephen King (& #8220; I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs& #8221; ), and Gertrude Stein (& #8220; Nouns . . . are completely not interesting& #8221; ). < br> < br> Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (& #8220; I did okay& #8221; ), to adjective (& #8220; It was an okay movie& #8221; ), to interjection (& #8220; Okay & #8221; ), to noun (& #8220; I gave my okay& #8221; ), to verb (& #8220; Who okayed this?& #8221; ), depending on its use. < br> < br> Avoid the pretentious preposition < i> at< /i> , a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., & #8220; The Shoppes at White Plains& #8221; ). < br> < br> Laugh when Yagoda says he & #8220; shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days& #8221; who insists on maintaining the distinction between < i> shall< /i> and < i> will< /i> .< br> < br> Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense< i> < /i> convey Yagoda& #8217; s unique sense of the & #8220; beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.& #8221; < /p>

Synopsis:

What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book.

In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since School House Rock have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It and:

Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (“If you catch an adjective, kill it”), Stephen King (“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs”), and Gertrude Stein (“Nouns . . . are completely not interesting”).

Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (“I did okay”), to adjective (“It was an okay movie”), to interjection (“Okay!”), to noun (“I gave my okay”), to verb (“Who okayed this?”), depending on its use.

Avoid the pretentious preposition at, a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., “The Shoppes at White Plains”).

Laugh when Yagoda says he “shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days” who insists on maintaining the distinction between shall and will.

Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense convey Yagodas unique sense of the “beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.”

About the Author

BEN YAGODA teaches English at the University of Delaware, and is the author of four books, including The Sound on the Page and About Town: The New Yorker and the World It Made. He has contributed to Slate.com, the New York Times Book Review, the American Scholar, Rolling Stone and Esquire, and writes an occasional column on language for the Chronicle of Higher Education. He lives in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780767920780
Author:
Yagoda, Ben
Publisher:
Broadway Books
Subject:
Grammar
Subject:
Grammar & Punctuation
Subject:
Vocabulary
Subject:
English language -- Grammar.
Subject:
Reference-Grammar and Style
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20071231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.01x5.20x.66 in. .48 lbs.

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Related Subjects


Reference » Grammar and Style
Reference » Grammar and Usage

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better And/Or Worse Used Trade Paper
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Product details 256 pages Broadway Books - English 9780767920780 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book.

In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since School House Rock have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It and:

Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (“If you catch an adjective, kill it”), Stephen King (“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs”), and Gertrude Stein (“Nouns . . . are completely not interesting”).

Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (“I did okay”), to adjective (“It was an okay movie”), to interjection (“Okay!”), to noun (“I gave my okay”), to verb (“Who okayed this?”), depending on its use.

Avoid the pretentious preposition at, a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., “The Shoppes at White Plains”).

Laugh when Yagoda says he “shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days” who insists on maintaining the distinction between shall and will.

Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense convey Yagodas unique sense of the “beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.”

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