Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | December 3, 2014

    Mary Oliver: IMG Mary Oliver: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better and/or Worse

by

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better and/or Worse Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

< p> What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book< i> .< /i> < /p> < p> In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since < i> School House Rock< /i> have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read < i> If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It < /i> and: < i> < br> < /i> < br> Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (& #8220; If you catch an adjective, kill it& #8221; ), Stephen King (& #8220; I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs& #8221; ), and Gertrude Stein (& #8220; Nouns . . . are completely not interesting& #8221; ). < br> < br> Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (& #8220; I did okay& #8221; ), to adjective (& #8220; It was an okay movie& #8221; ), to interjection (& #8220; Okay & #8221; ), to noun (& #8220; I gave my okay& #8221; ), to verb (& #8220; Who okayed this?& #8221; ), depending on its use. < br> < br> Avoid the pretentious preposition < i> at< /i> , a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., & #8220; The Shoppes at White Plains& #8221; ). < br> < br> Laugh when Yagoda says he & #8220; shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days& #8221; who insists on maintaining the distinction between < i> shall< /i> and < i> will< /i> .< br> < br> Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense< i> < /i> convey Yagoda& #8217; s unique sense of the & #8220; beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.& #8221; < /p>

Synopsis:

The author of The Sound on the Page offers an irreverent but insightful look at the nine parts of speech in the English language, with whimsical guidelines on how to use adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs appropriately. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book.

In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since School House Rock have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It and:

Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (“If you catch an adjective, kill it”), Stephen King (“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs”), and Gertrude Stein (“Nouns . . . are completely not interesting”).

Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (“I did okay”), to adjective (“It was an okay movie”), to interjection (“Okay!”), to noun (“I gave my okay”), to verb (“Who okayed this?”), depending on its use.

Avoid the pretentious preposition at, a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., “The Shoppes at White Plains”).

Laugh when Yagoda says he “shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days” who insists on maintaining the distinction between shall and will.

Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense convey Yagoda’s unique sense of the “beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.”

About the Author

BEN YAGODA teaches English at the University of Delaware, and is the author of four books, including The Sound on the Page and About Town: The New Yorker and the World It Made. He has contributed to Slate.com, the New York Times Book Review, the American Scholar, Rolling Stone and Esquire, and writes an occasional column on language for the Chronicle of Higher Education. He lives in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780767929318
Subtitle:
The Parts of Speech, for Better and/or Worse
Publisher:
Broadway Books
Author:
Yagoda, Ben
Author:
Ben Yagoda
Subject:
Language Arts & Disciplines : Grammar
Subject:
Language Arts & Disciplines : Grammar & Punctuation
Subject:
Language Arts & Disciplines : General
Subject:
Grammar
Subject:
Grammar & Punctuation
Subject:
Vocabulary
Subject:
English language -- Grammar.
Subject:
Reference-Grammar and Style
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20071226
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
241

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Linguistics » Specific Languages and Groups
History and Social Science » Linguistics » Syntax
Reference » Grammar and Style
Reference » Spelling and Vocabulary

When You Catch an Adjective, Kill It: The Parts of Speech, for Better and/or Worse
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 241 pages Crown Publishing Group - English 9780767929318 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The author of The Sound on the Page offers an irreverent but insightful look at the nine parts of speech in the English language, with whimsical guidelines on how to use adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs appropriately. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , What do you get when you mix nine parts of speech, one great writer, and generous dashes of insight, humor, and irreverence? One phenomenally entertaining language book.

In his waggish yet authoritative book, Ben Yagoda has managed to undo the dark work of legions of English teachers and libraries of dusty grammar texts. Not since School House Rock have adjectives, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, nouns, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs been explored with such infectious exuberance. Read If You Catch an Adjective, Kill It and:

Learn how to write better with classic advice from writers such as Mark Twain (“If you catch an adjective, kill it”), Stephen King (“I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs”), and Gertrude Stein (“Nouns . . . are completely not interesting”).

Marvel at how a single word can shift from adverb (“I did okay”), to adjective (“It was an okay movie”), to interjection (“Okay!”), to noun (“I gave my okay”), to verb (“Who okayed this?”), depending on its use.

Avoid the pretentious preposition at, a favorite of real estate developers (e.g., “The Shoppes at White Plains”).

Laugh when Yagoda says he “shall call anyone a dork to the end of his days” who insists on maintaining the distinction between shall and will.

Read, and discover a book whose pop culture references, humorous asides, and bracing doses of discernment and common sense convey Yagoda’s unique sense of the “beauty, the joy, the artistry, and the fun of language.”

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.