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Alabi's World (Johns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic History & Culture)

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Alabi's World (Johns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic History & Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the early 18th century, the Dutch colony of Suriname was the envy of all others in the Americas. There, seven hundred Europeans lived off the labor of over four thousand enslaved Africans. Owned by men hell-bent for quick prosperity, the rich plantations on the Suriname river became known for their heights of planter comfort and opulence — and for their depths of slave misery. Slaves who tried to escape were hunted by the planter militia. If found they were publicly tortured. (A common punishment was for the Achilles tendon to be removed for a first offense, the right leg amputated for a second.) Resisting this cruelty first in small numbers, then in an ever increasing torrent, slaves began to form outlaw communities until nearly one out of every ten Africans in Suriname was helping to build rebel villages in the jungle.

Alabi's World relates the history of a nation founded by escaped slaves deep in the Latin American rain forest. It tells of the black men and women's bloody battles for independence, their uneasy truce with the colonial government, and the attempt of their great leader, Alabi, to reconcile his people with white law and a white God. In a unique historical experiment, Richard Price presents this history by weaving together four voices: the vivid historical accounts related by the slaves' descendants, largely those of Alabi's own villagers, the Saramaka; the reports of the often exasperated colonial officials sent to control the slave communities; the otherworldly diaries of the German Moravian missionaries determined to convert the heathen masses; and the historian's own, mediating voice.

The Saramaka voices in these pages recall a world of powerful spirits — called obia's — and renowned heroes, great celebrations and fierce blood-feuds. They also recall, with unconcealed relish, successes in confounding the colonial officials and in bending the treaty to the benefit of their own people. From the opposite side of the negotiations, the colonial Postholders speak of the futility of trying to hold the village leaders to their vow to return any further runaway slaves. Equally frustrated, the Moravian missionaries describe the rigors of their proselytising efforts in the black villages — places of licentiousness and idol-worship that seemed to be a foretaste of what hell must be like. Among their only zealous converts was Alabi, who stood nearly alone in his attempts to bridge the cultural gap between black and white — defiantly working to lead his people on the path toward harmony with their former enemies.

From the confluence of these voices — set throughout the book in four different typefaces — Price creates a fully nuanced portrait of the collision of cultures. It is a confrontation, he suggests, that was enacted thousands of times across the slaveholding Americas as white men strained to suppress black culture and blacks resisted — determined to preserve their heritage and beliefs.

Book News Annotation:

A virtuosic display of scholarship, erudition and imagination by noted ethno-anthropologist Price. Recounts through the interweaving of four distinct voices (set in four type styles) the way 18th century Saramakas (Surinamese Maroons) and whites, at the end of a very long war, developed routines, rituals, and institutions that allowed them to live side-by-side in peace. A tour de force.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Expanding the possibilities of historical writing, this multivocal narrative invites the reader to participate directly in the act of historical imagination. Richard Price is an expert guide through these first-hand accounts-as white colonists strain to suppress black culture, and blacks resist, determined to create and preserve their own distinctly Afro-American lifeways.

Synopsis:

Alabi's World relates the history of a nation founded by escaped slaves deep in the Latin American rain forest. It tells of the black men and women's bloody battles for independence, their uneasy truce with the colonial government, and the attempt of their great leader, Alabi, to reconcile his people with white law and a white God.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780801839566
Author:
Price, Richard
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Biography
Subject:
History
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
South American
Subject:
Colonies
Subject:
Latin America - South America
Subject:
Suriname
Subject:
Saramacca (Surinamese people)
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Series:
Johns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic History & Culture
Publication Date:
19900531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
472
Dimensions:
9.97x6.38x1.12 in. 1.81 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Networking » General
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Latin America » Caribbean
History and Social Science » World History » General

Alabi's World (Johns Hopkins Studies in Atlantic History & Culture) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 472 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9780801839566 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Expanding the possibilities of historical writing, this multivocal narrative invites the reader to participate directly in the act of historical imagination. Richard Price is an expert guide through these first-hand accounts-as white colonists strain to suppress black culture, and blacks resist, determined to create and preserve their own distinctly Afro-American lifeways.
"Synopsis" by , Alabi's World relates the history of a nation founded by escaped slaves deep in the Latin American rain forest. It tells of the black men and women's bloody battles for independence, their uneasy truce with the colonial government, and the attempt of their great leader, Alabi, to reconcile his people with white law and a white God.
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