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The Culture of the Cold War (American Moment)

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The Culture of the Cold War (American Moment) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

We commonly think of the psychedelic sixties as an explosion of creative energy and freedom that arose in direct revolt against the social restraint and authoritarian hierarchy of the early Cold War years. Yet, as Fred Turner reveals in The Democratic Surround, the decades that brought us the Korean War and communist witch hunts also witnessed an extraordinary turn toward explicitly democratic, open, and inclusive ideas of communication and with them new, flexible models of social order. Surprisingly, he shows that it was this turn that brought us the revolutionary multimedia and wild-eyed individualism of the 1960s counterculture.

In this prequel to his celebrated book From Counterculture to Cyberculture, Turner rewrites the history of postwar America, showing how in the 1940s and andrsquo;50s American liberalism offered a far more radical social vision than we now remember. Turner tracks the influential mid-century entwining of Bauhaus aesthetics with American social science and psychology. From the Museum of Modern Art in New York to the New Bauhaus in Chicago and Black Mountain College in North Carolina, Turner shows how some of the most well-known artists and intellectuals of the forties developed new models of media, new theories of interpersonal and international collaboration, and new visions of an open, tolerant, and democratic self in direct contrast to the repression and conformity associated with the fascist and communist movements. He then shows how their work shaped some of the most significant media events of the Cold War, including Edward Steichenandrsquo;s Family of Man exhibition, the multimedia performances of John Cage, and, ultimately, the psychedelic Be-Ins of the sixties. Turner demonstrates that by the end of the 1950s this vision of the democratic self and the media built to promote it would actually become part of the mainstream, even shaping American propaganda efforts in Europe.

Overturning common misconceptions of these transformational years, The Democratic Surround shows just how much the artistic and social radicalism of the sixties owed to the liberal ideals of Cold War America, a democratic vision that still underlies our hopes for digital media today.

Review:

"They say God protects children, fools, and the United States of America. But who protects Americans? During the Cold War era, no one. We went at each other with all the ferocity of the witch hunters of yore, with this difference: we destroyed each other psychologically rather than in the flames. It really was an awful time, and in this splendid book Professor Stephen Whitfield of Brandeis University shows us just how dearly we have paid for that protracted orgy." Reviewed by Daniel Weiss, Virginia Quarterly Review (Copyright 2006 Virginia Quarterly Review)

Synopsis:

Without the Cold War, what's the point of being an American? As if in answer to this poignant question from John Updike's Rabbit at Rest, Stephen Whitfield examines the impact of the Cold War — and its dramatic ending — on American culture in an updated version of his highly acclaimed study. In a new epilogue to this second edition, he extends his analysis from the McCarthyism of the 1950s, including its effects on the American and European intelligensia, to the civil rights movement of the 1960s and beyond.

Whitfield treats his subject matter with the eye of a historian, reminding the reader that the Cold War is now a thing of the past. His treatment underscores the importance of the Cold War to our national identity and forces the reader to ask, Where do we go from here? The question is especially crucial for the Cold War historian, Whitfield argues. His new epilogue is partly a guide for new historians to tackle the complexities of Cold War studies.

Synopsis:

"A lively and well documented account of how the Cold War both produced and was sustained by super-patriotism, intolerance, and suspicion, and how these pathologies infected all aspects of American life in the 1950s--entertainment, churches, schools." — Foreign Affairs

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [243]-265) and index.

About the Author

Fred Turner is associate professor of communication at Stanford University. He is the author of Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory and From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism, also published by the University of Chicago Press. He lives in California.
and#160;

Table of Contents

Introduction

and#160;

PART ONE

World War II and the Making of the Democratic Surround

and#160;

1and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Where Did All the Fascists Come From?

and#160;

2and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; World War II and the Question of National Characterand#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

and#160;

3and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The New Language of Vision

and#160;

4and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The New Landscape of Sound

and#160;

and#160;

PART TWO

The Democratic Surround in the Cold War

and#160;

5and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The Cold War and the Democratic Personality

and#160;

6and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The Museum of Modern Art Makes the World a Familyand#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

and#160;

7and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Therapeutic Nationalism

and#160;

8and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The Coming of the Counterculture

and#160;

and#160;

Acknowledgments

and#160;

Notes

and#160;

Bibliography

and#160;

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780801851957
Author:
Whitfield, Stephen J.
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Author:
Turner, Fred
Location:
Baltimore :
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1945 to present)
Subject:
Cold war
Subject:
Cold War -- Social aspects -- United States.
Subject:
Guerra Frâia
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1945 to 2000)
Subject:
Popular culture -- United States -- History.
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Edition Number:
2
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
American Moment (Paperback)
Series Volume:
UP198
Publication Date:
19960431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
39 halftones
Pages:
376
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.2 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Peace and War
History and Social Science » US History » 1920 to 1960
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

The Culture of the Cold War (American Moment) New Trade Paper
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Product details 376 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9780801851957 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Without the Cold War, what's the point of being an American? As if in answer to this poignant question from John Updike's Rabbit at Rest, Stephen Whitfield examines the impact of the Cold War — and its dramatic ending — on American culture in an updated version of his highly acclaimed study. In a new epilogue to this second edition, he extends his analysis from the McCarthyism of the 1950s, including its effects on the American and European intelligensia, to the civil rights movement of the 1960s and beyond.

Whitfield treats his subject matter with the eye of a historian, reminding the reader that the Cold War is now a thing of the past. His treatment underscores the importance of the Cold War to our national identity and forces the reader to ask, Where do we go from here? The question is especially crucial for the Cold War historian, Whitfield argues. His new epilogue is partly a guide for new historians to tackle the complexities of Cold War studies.

"Synopsis" by , "A lively and well documented account of how the Cold War both produced and was sustained by super-patriotism, intolerance, and suspicion, and how these pathologies infected all aspects of American life in the 1950s--entertainment, churches, schools." — Foreign Affairs
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