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- Local Warehouse World History- England General

Power, Knowledge, and Expertise in Elizabethan England

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Power, Knowledge, and Expertise in Elizabethan England Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"An original and compelling study of the invention of a new social role in Elizabethan England: the expert mediator." — Pamela Smith, Pomona College

Book News Annotation:

As early modern European regimes grew larger, more powerful, and wealthier, the small number of ministers at court could not possibly monitor and manage the entire realm, says Ash (history, Wayne State U.), and were required to delegate some authority to trusted intermediaries to implement royal policies and directives at the local level. He explores this phenomenon and these people in Elizabethan England, focusing on technical experts in mining, building, and navigation.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

However dramatic, England's victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 was neither lucky nor miraculous. It was the result of myriad technological and organizational innovations instigated over the preceding thirty years during the reign of Elizabeth I. Like its continental rivals, England's government in this period grew larger, more powerful, and more centralized. To manage technically complex projects, royal administrators recruited trusted experts to serve as mediators between themselves and those working to complete the project at hand.

Eric H. Ash follows the rise of this pivotal new figure, the expert mediator, in the political and intellectual landscape of early modern Europe. Using a series of case studies — copper mining, the rebuilding of Dover harbor in the early 1580s, the introduction of mathematics to navigation, and the creation of navigational manuals — he examines the growing use of such expertise, by the crown's ministers and private entrepreneurs under royal charter. Tracing the evolution of expertise from its practical foundation to the more theoretical approach embodied by Francis Bacon, Ash finds that the individuals most successful in receiving patronage were those who portrayed themselves not as practitioners but as masters of theoretical principles. These mediators increased their social status by distinguishing themselves from common craftsmen. Knowledge and expertise thus acquired status and power, as Ash explores in this instructive early example.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780801879920
Author:
Ash, Eric H.
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Location:
Baltimore
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
History
Subject:
Engineering - Civil
Subject:
Power (Social sciences)
Subject:
Knowledge, sociology of
Subject:
Expertise.
Subject:
Power
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
Civil
Subject:
Great Britain Politics and government.
Subject:
Power (Social sciences) -- Great Britain.
Subject:
World History-England General
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series Volume:
no. 2
Publication Date:
20041231
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9.50x6.40x.85 in. 1.17 lbs.

Related Subjects

Engineering » Civil Engineering » General
Engineering » Engineering » History
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Power, Knowledge, and Expertise in Elizabethan England New Hardcover
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Product details 280 pages Johns Hopkins University Press - English 9780801879920 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , However dramatic, England's victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 was neither lucky nor miraculous. It was the result of myriad technological and organizational innovations instigated over the preceding thirty years during the reign of Elizabeth I. Like its continental rivals, England's government in this period grew larger, more powerful, and more centralized. To manage technically complex projects, royal administrators recruited trusted experts to serve as mediators between themselves and those working to complete the project at hand.

Eric H. Ash follows the rise of this pivotal new figure, the expert mediator, in the political and intellectual landscape of early modern Europe. Using a series of case studies — copper mining, the rebuilding of Dover harbor in the early 1580s, the introduction of mathematics to navigation, and the creation of navigational manuals — he examines the growing use of such expertise, by the crown's ministers and private entrepreneurs under royal charter. Tracing the evolution of expertise from its practical foundation to the more theoretical approach embodied by Francis Bacon, Ash finds that the individuals most successful in receiving patronage were those who portrayed themselves not as practitioners but as masters of theoretical principles. These mediators increased their social status by distinguishing themselves from common craftsmen. Knowledge and expertise thus acquired status and power, as Ash explores in this instructive early example.

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