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25 Remote Warehouse World History- Mexico

Other titles in the Mexican Experience series:

Mexico, La Patria: Propaganda and Production During World War II (Mexican Experience)

by

Mexico, La Patria: Propaganda and Production During World War II (Mexican Experience) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Drawing on an analysis of issues surrounding the consumption of alcohol in a diverse range of source materials, including novels, newspapers, medical texts, and archival records, this lively and engaging interdisciplinary study explores sociocultural nation-building processes in Mexico between 1810 and 1910. Examining the historical importance of drinking as both an important feature of Mexican social life and a persistent source of concern for Mexican intellectuals and politicians, Deborah Toners Alcohol and Nationhood in Nineteenth-Century Mexico offers surprising insights into how the nation was constructed and deconstructed in the nineteenth century.

Although Mexican intellectuals did indeed condemn the physically and morally debilitating aspects of excessive alcohol consumption and worried that particularly Mexican drinks and drinking places were preventing Mexicos progress as a nation, they also identified more culturally valuable aspects of Mexican drinking cultures that ought to be celebrated as part of an “authentic” Mexican national culture. The intertwined literary and historical analysis in this study illustrates how wide-ranging the connections were between ideas about drinking, poverty, crime, insanity, citizenship, patriotism, gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity in the nineteenth century, and the book makes timely and important contributions to the fields of Latin American literature, alcohol studies, and the social and cultural history of nation-building.

Synopsis:

Mexicoand#8217;s Reforma, the mid-nineteenth-century liberal revolution, decisively shaped the country by disestablishing the Catholic Church, secularizing public affairs, and laying the foundations of a truly national economy and culture.

and#160;

and#160;
The Lawyer of the Church is an examination of the Mexican clergyand#8217;s response to the Reforma through a study of the life and works of Bishop Clemente de Jesand#250;s Munguand#237;a (1810and#8211;68), one of the most influential yet least-known figures of the period. By analyzing how Munguand#237;a responded to changing political and intellectual scenarios in defense of the clergyand#8217;s legal prerogatives and social role, Pablo Mijangos y Gonzand#225;lez argues that the Catholic Church opposed the liberal revolution not because of its supposed attachment to a bygone past but rather because of its efforts to supersede colonial tradition and refashion itself within a liberal yet confessional state. With an eye on the international influences and dimensions of the Mexican church-state conflict, The Lawyer of the Church also explores how Mexican bishops gradually tightened their relationship with the Holy See and simultaneously managed to incorporate the papacy into their local affairs, thus paving the way for the eventual and#8220;Romanizationand#8221; of Mexican Catholicism during the later decades of the century.
and#160;

Synopsis:

Admiral Paul von Hintze arrived in Mexico in the spring of 1911 to serve as Germanyand#8217;s ambassador to a country in a state of revolution. Germanyand#8217;s emperor Wilhelm II had selected Hintze as his personal eyes and ears in Mexico (and concomitantly the neighboring United States) during the portentous years leading up to the First World War. The ambassador benefited from a network of informers throughout Mexico and was closely involved in the countryand#8217;s political and diplomatic machinations as the violent revolution played out.

Murder and Counterrevolution in Mexico presents Hintzeand#8217;s eyewitness accounts of these turbulent years. Hintzeand#8217;s diary, telegrams, letters, and other records, translated, edited, and annotated by Friedrich E. Schuler, offer detailed insight into Victoriano Huertaand#8217;s overthrow and assassination of Francisco Madero and Huertaand#8217;s ensuing dictatorship and chronicle the U.S.-supported resistance.

Showcasing the political relationship between Germany and Mexico, Hintzeand#8217;s suspenseful, often daily diary entries provide new insight into the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution, including U.S. diplomatic maneuvers and subterfuge, as well as an intriguing backstory to the infamous 1917 Zimmermann Telegram, which precipitated U.S. entry into World War I.

About the Author

Monica A. Rankin is an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of the Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture: The Search for National Identity, 1820s-1900.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780803224551
Author:
Rankin, Monica A.
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Author:
o T.
Author:
Mijangos y. Gonzalez, Pablo
Author:
ner, Deborah
Author:
Pablo Mijangos y Gonzalez
Author:
Albarran, Elena Jackson
Author:
Toner, Deborah
Author:
Schuler, Friedrich E.
Subject:
Latin America - Mexico
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
United States History.
Subject:
Mexico Foreign relations United States.
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
Mexico
Subject:
World History-Mexico
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Mexican Experience
Series Volume:
Children and Revolut
Publication Date:
20100131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
57 images
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Mexico
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports Psychology

Mexico, La Patria: Propaganda and Production During World War II (Mexican Experience) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.75 In Stock
Product details 384 pages University of Nebraska Press - English 9780803224551 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Mexicoand#8217;s Reforma, the mid-nineteenth-century liberal revolution, decisively shaped the country by disestablishing the Catholic Church, secularizing public affairs, and laying the foundations of a truly national economy and culture.

and#160;

and#160;
The Lawyer of the Church is an examination of the Mexican clergyand#8217;s response to the Reforma through a study of the life and works of Bishop Clemente de Jesand#250;s Munguand#237;a (1810and#8211;68), one of the most influential yet least-known figures of the period. By analyzing how Munguand#237;a responded to changing political and intellectual scenarios in defense of the clergyand#8217;s legal prerogatives and social role, Pablo Mijangos y Gonzand#225;lez argues that the Catholic Church opposed the liberal revolution not because of its supposed attachment to a bygone past but rather because of its efforts to supersede colonial tradition and refashion itself within a liberal yet confessional state. With an eye on the international influences and dimensions of the Mexican church-state conflict, The Lawyer of the Church also explores how Mexican bishops gradually tightened their relationship with the Holy See and simultaneously managed to incorporate the papacy into their local affairs, thus paving the way for the eventual and#8220;Romanizationand#8221; of Mexican Catholicism during the later decades of the century.
and#160;

"Synopsis" by , Admiral Paul von Hintze arrived in Mexico in the spring of 1911 to serve as Germanyand#8217;s ambassador to a country in a state of revolution. Germanyand#8217;s emperor Wilhelm II had selected Hintze as his personal eyes and ears in Mexico (and concomitantly the neighboring United States) during the portentous years leading up to the First World War. The ambassador benefited from a network of informers throughout Mexico and was closely involved in the countryand#8217;s political and diplomatic machinations as the violent revolution played out.

Murder and Counterrevolution in Mexico presents Hintzeand#8217;s eyewitness accounts of these turbulent years. Hintzeand#8217;s diary, telegrams, letters, and other records, translated, edited, and annotated by Friedrich E. Schuler, offer detailed insight into Victoriano Huertaand#8217;s overthrow and assassination of Francisco Madero and Huertaand#8217;s ensuing dictatorship and chronicle the U.S.-supported resistance.

Showcasing the political relationship between Germany and Mexico, Hintzeand#8217;s suspenseful, often daily diary entries provide new insight into the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution, including U.S. diplomatic maneuvers and subterfuge, as well as an intriguing backstory to the infamous 1917 Zimmermann Telegram, which precipitated U.S. entry into World War I.

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