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Eating in Eden: Food and American Utopias (At Table)

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Eating in Eden: Food and American Utopias (At Table) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Perennially viewed as both a utopian land of abundant resources and a fallen nation of consummate consumers, North America has provided a fertile setting for the development of distinctive foodways reflecting the diverse visions of life in the United States. Immigrants, from colonial English Puritans and Spanish Catholics to mid-twentieth-century European Jews and contemporary Indian Hindus, have generated innovative foodways in creating and#8220;new worldand#8221; religious and ethnic identities. The Shakers, the Oneida Perfectionists, and the Amana Colony, as well as 1970s counter-cultural groups, developed food practices that distinguished communal members from outsiders, but they also marketed their food to nonmembers through festivals, restaurants, and cookbooks. Other groupsand#8212;from elite male dining clubs in Revolutionary America and female college students in the late 1800s, to members of food co-ops; vegetarian Jews and Buddhists; and and#8220;foodiesand#8221; who watched TV cooking showsand#8212;have used food strategically to promote their ideals of gender, social class, nonviolence, environmentalism, or taste in the hope of transforming national or global society.

This theoretically informed, interdisciplinary collection of thirteen essays broadens familiar definitions of utopianism and community to explore the ways Americans have produced, consumed, avoided, and marketed food and food-related products and meanings to further their visionary ideals.

Synopsis:

A study of community visions of food and the relationship to other communal ideals, including ethnicity, religious affiliation, and gender roles.

Synopsis:

Perennially viewed as both a utopian land of abundant resources and a fallen nation of consummate consumers, North America has provided a fertile setting for the development of distinctive foodways reflecting the diverse visions of life in the United States. Immigrants, from colonial English Puritans and Spanish Catholics to mid-twentieth-century European Jews and contemporary Indian Hindus, have generated innovative foodways in creating “new world” religious and ethnic identities. The Shakers, the Oneida Perfectionists, and the Amana Colony, as well as 1970s counter-cultural groups, developed food practices that distinguished communal members from outsiders, but they also marketed their food to nonmembers through festivals, restaurants, and cookbooks. Other groups—from elite male dining clubs in Revolutionary America and female college students in the late 1800s, to members of food co-ops; vegetarian Jews and Buddhists; and “foodies” who watched TV cooking shows—have used food strategically to promote their ideals of gender, social class, nonviolence, environmentalism, or taste in the hope of transforming national or global society.

This theoretically informed, interdisciplinary collection of thirteen essays broadens familiar definitions of utopianism and community to explore the ways Americans have produced, consumed, avoided, and marketed food and food-related products and meanings to further their visionary ideals.

About the Author

Etta M. Madden is a professor of English at Missouri State University and the author of Bodies of Life: Shaker Literature and Literacies. Martha L. Finch is an assistant professor of religious studies at Missouri State University.

The contributors to this volume include Jonathan G. Andelson, Priscilla J. Brewer, Wendy E. Chmielewski, Trudy Eden, Martha L. Finch, Etta M. Madden, Monica Mak, Kathryn McClymond, Maria McGrath, Ellen Posman, Margaret Puskar-Pasewicz, Mary Rizzo, Phillip H. Round, and Debra Shostak.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780803232518
Subtitle:
Food and American Utopias
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Other:
Madden, Etta M.
Editor:
Madden, Etta M.
Editor:
Madden, Etta M.; Finch, Martha L.
Editor:
Finch, Etta M.
Editor:
Finch, Martha L.
Editor:
Finch, Martha L.; Madden, Etta M.
Author:
Finch, Martha L.
Author:
Madden, Etta M.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Gastronomy
Subject:
Food habits
Subject:
Regional & Ethnic - American - General
Subject:
Cooking and Food-US General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
At Table
Publication Date:
20061001
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Illus.
Pages:
296
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.4 lb

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking

Eating in Eden: Food and American Utopias (At Table)
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 296 pages University of Nebraska Press - English 9780803232518 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A study of community visions of food and the relationship to other communal ideals, including ethnicity, religious affiliation, and gender roles.
"Synopsis" by ,

Perennially viewed as both a utopian land of abundant resources and a fallen nation of consummate consumers, North America has provided a fertile setting for the development of distinctive foodways reflecting the diverse visions of life in the United States. Immigrants, from colonial English Puritans and Spanish Catholics to mid-twentieth-century European Jews and contemporary Indian Hindus, have generated innovative foodways in creating “new world” religious and ethnic identities. The Shakers, the Oneida Perfectionists, and the Amana Colony, as well as 1970s counter-cultural groups, developed food practices that distinguished communal members from outsiders, but they also marketed their food to nonmembers through festivals, restaurants, and cookbooks. Other groups—from elite male dining clubs in Revolutionary America and female college students in the late 1800s, to members of food co-ops; vegetarian Jews and Buddhists; and “foodies” who watched TV cooking shows—have used food strategically to promote their ideals of gender, social class, nonviolence, environmentalism, or taste in the hope of transforming national or global society.

This theoretically informed, interdisciplinary collection of thirteen essays broadens familiar definitions of utopianism and community to explore the ways Americans have produced, consumed, avoided, and marketed food and food-related products and meanings to further their visionary ideals.

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