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In Praise of Flattery (Stages)

by

In Praise of Flattery (Stages) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Where would we be without flattery? Hobbes deemed it an honorable duty and Meredith called it the “finest of the arts.” Alexander the Great applied it as imperial policy; Caesar and Cleopatra were masters of it; and Napoleon devoured it like candy. But flattery also has influential enemies. Cicero called flattery “the handmaid of vice” and Tacitus compared it to poison. 
 
In a work as erudite as it is entertaining, Willis Goth Regier looks into flattery as an element as flammable (and as taken for granted) as oxygen. Giving flattery light, attention, and care, Regier treats readers to hundreds of historical examples drawn from the highest social circles in politics, romance, and religion, from the courts of Byzantium and China to Paris, Rome, and Washington, DC.
 
Because flattery must please, it is playful and creative, and Regier’s book makes the most of it, moving with light steps, now and then pausing to take in the view. Ambitious flatterers even seek to flatter God, a practice Regier treats with trepidation. This is a book for those who would understand the history, tactics, and pleasures of flattery, not least the thrill of danger.
 
“O, flatter me, for love delights in praises.”—Shakespeare
 
“The whole World and the Bus’ness of it, is Manag’d by Flattery and Paradox; the one sets up False Gods, and the other maintains them.”—Sir Roger L’Estrange
 
“Just praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present.”—Samuel Johnson
 
“In this disorganized society, in which the passions of the people are the sole real force, authority belongs to the party that understands how to flatter.”—Hippolyte Taine

Review:

"The research is thorough and the writing compelling in historian Regier's latest, but the appeal of this academic exploration of the art and history of flattery will likely be quite limited. The author of Book of the Sphnix and editor of Masterpieces of American Indian Literature, Regier compiles 128 'rules' of flattery culled from artists, authors, philosophers, statesmen and kings that take readers through the history of what happens 'when praise seeks a reward' (Rule 1). Explaining flattery's role in professional and personal relationships through time and around the world, Regier's far-reaching study includes forays into business, art, fable, family, government, gift-giving and God, as well as a double handful of illustrations. Despite its brevity, readers will need patience to stick with it; if they do, they'll be rewarded with a trove of rhetorical-philosophical gems: 'Flatteries are the building blocks of fame,' 'Poets are the aristocracy of flattery,' 'Flattery is the school for praise.' Unfortunately, the total is significantly lesser than the sum of its parts." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

< div> < div> Where would we be without flattery? Hobbes deemed it an honorable duty and Meredith called it the & #8220; finest of the arts.& #8221; Alexander the Great applied it as imperial policy; Caesar and Cleopatra were masters of it; and Napoleon devoured it like candy. But flattery also has influential enemies. Cicero called flattery & #8220; the handmaid of vice& #8221; and Tacitus compared it to poison.& nbsp; < br> < br> & nbsp; < br> < br> In a work as erudite as it is entertaining, Willis Goth Regier looks into flattery as an element as flammable (and as taken for granted) as oxygen. Giving flattery light, attention, and care, Regier treats readers to hundreds of historical examples drawn from the highest social circles in politics, romance, and religion, from the courts of Byzantium and China to Paris, Rome, and Washington, DC.< br> < br> & nbsp; < br> < br> Because flattery must please, it is playful and creative, and Regier& #8217; s book makes the most of it, moving with light steps, now and then pausing to take in the view. Ambitious flatterers even seek to flatter God, a practice Regier treats with trepidation. This is a book for those who would understand the history, tactics, and pleasures of flattery, not least the thrill of danger.< br> < br> & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; < br> < br> < /div> < /div>

Synopsis:

Where would we be without flattery? Hobbes deemed it an honorable duty and Meredith called it the “finest of the arts.” Alexander the Great applied it as imperial policy; Caesar and Cleopatra were masters of it; and Napoleon devoured it like candy. But flattery also has influential enemies. Cicero called flattery “the handmaid of vice” and Tacitus compared it to poison. 
 
In a work as erudite as it is entertaining, Willis Goth Regier looks into flattery as an element as flammable (and as taken for granted) as oxygen. Giving flattery light, attention, and care, Regier treats readers to hundreds of historical examples drawn from the highest social circles in politics, romance, and religion, from the courts of Byzantium and China to Paris, Rome, and Washington, DC.
 
Because flattery must please, it is playful and creative, and Regiers book makes the most of it, moving with light steps, now and then pausing to take in the view. Ambitious flatterers even seek to flatter God, a practice Regier treats with trepidation. This is a book for those who would understand the history, tactics, and pleasures of flattery, not least the thrill of danger.
 
“O, flatter me, for love delights in praises.”&#8212;Shakespeare
 
“The whole World and the Busness of it, is Managd by Flattery and Paradox; the one sets up False Gods, and the other maintains them.”&#8212;Sir Roger LEstrange
 
“Just praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present.”&#8212;Samuel Johnson
 
“In this disorganized society, in which the passions of the people are the sole real force, authority belongs to the party that understands how to flatter.”&#8212;Hippolyte Taine

About the Author

Willis Goth Regier is the director of the University of Illinois Press. He is the author of Book of the Sphinx and editor of Masterpieces of American Indian Literature, both available in Bison Books editions.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780803239692
Author:
Regier, Willis Goth
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Subject:
Etiquette
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Praise
Subject:
HIS054000
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Stages
Publication Date:
20071131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
23 Illus., index
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 0.85 lb

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Relationships
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies

In Praise of Flattery (Stages) Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages University of Nebraska Press - English 9780803239692 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The research is thorough and the writing compelling in historian Regier's latest, but the appeal of this academic exploration of the art and history of flattery will likely be quite limited. The author of Book of the Sphnix and editor of Masterpieces of American Indian Literature, Regier compiles 128 'rules' of flattery culled from artists, authors, philosophers, statesmen and kings that take readers through the history of what happens 'when praise seeks a reward' (Rule 1). Explaining flattery's role in professional and personal relationships through time and around the world, Regier's far-reaching study includes forays into business, art, fable, family, government, gift-giving and God, as well as a double handful of illustrations. Despite its brevity, readers will need patience to stick with it; if they do, they'll be rewarded with a trove of rhetorical-philosophical gems: 'Flatteries are the building blocks of fame,' 'Poets are the aristocracy of flattery,' 'Flattery is the school for praise.' Unfortunately, the total is significantly lesser than the sum of its parts." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , < div> < div> Where would we be without flattery? Hobbes deemed it an honorable duty and Meredith called it the & #8220; finest of the arts.& #8221; Alexander the Great applied it as imperial policy; Caesar and Cleopatra were masters of it; and Napoleon devoured it like candy. But flattery also has influential enemies. Cicero called flattery & #8220; the handmaid of vice& #8221; and Tacitus compared it to poison.& nbsp; < br> < br> & nbsp; < br> < br> In a work as erudite as it is entertaining, Willis Goth Regier looks into flattery as an element as flammable (and as taken for granted) as oxygen. Giving flattery light, attention, and care, Regier treats readers to hundreds of historical examples drawn from the highest social circles in politics, romance, and religion, from the courts of Byzantium and China to Paris, Rome, and Washington, DC.< br> < br> & nbsp; < br> < br> Because flattery must please, it is playful and creative, and Regier& #8217; s book makes the most of it, moving with light steps, now and then pausing to take in the view. Ambitious flatterers even seek to flatter God, a practice Regier treats with trepidation. This is a book for those who would understand the history, tactics, and pleasures of flattery, not least the thrill of danger.< br> < br> & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; < br> < br> < /div> < /div>
"Synopsis" by ,
Where would we be without flattery? Hobbes deemed it an honorable duty and Meredith called it the “finest of the arts.” Alexander the Great applied it as imperial policy; Caesar and Cleopatra were masters of it; and Napoleon devoured it like candy. But flattery also has influential enemies. Cicero called flattery “the handmaid of vice” and Tacitus compared it to poison. 
 
In a work as erudite as it is entertaining, Willis Goth Regier looks into flattery as an element as flammable (and as taken for granted) as oxygen. Giving flattery light, attention, and care, Regier treats readers to hundreds of historical examples drawn from the highest social circles in politics, romance, and religion, from the courts of Byzantium and China to Paris, Rome, and Washington, DC.
 
Because flattery must please, it is playful and creative, and Regiers book makes the most of it, moving with light steps, now and then pausing to take in the view. Ambitious flatterers even seek to flatter God, a practice Regier treats with trepidation. This is a book for those who would understand the history, tactics, and pleasures of flattery, not least the thrill of danger.
 
“O, flatter me, for love delights in praises.”&#8212;Shakespeare
 
“The whole World and the Busness of it, is Managd by Flattery and Paradox; the one sets up False Gods, and the other maintains them.”&#8212;Sir Roger LEstrange
 
“Just praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present.”&#8212;Samuel Johnson
 
“In this disorganized society, in which the passions of the people are the sole real force, authority belongs to the party that understands how to flatter.”&#8212;Hippolyte Taine
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