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Other titles in the Cultural Lives of Law series:

The Cultural Lives of Capital Punishment: Comparative Perspectives

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The Cultural Lives of Capital Punishment: Comparative Perspectives Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

< div> How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity?< br> < br> After centuries during which capital punishment was a normal and self-evident part of criminal punishment, it has now taken on a life of its own in various arenas far beyond the limits of the penal sphere. In this volume, the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty, we need to know more about the cultural lives& #8212; past and present& #8212; of the state& #8217; s ultimate sanction. < br> < br> They undertake this & #8220; cultural voyage& #8221; comparatively& #8212; examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea& #8212; arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment & #8220; lives& #8221; or & #8220; dies& #8221; in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition. < br> < br> Contributors: < br> < br> Sangmin Bae < br> < br> Christian Boulanger < br> < br> Julia Eckert < br> < br> Agata Fijalkowski < br> < br> Evi Girling< br> < br> Virgil K.Y. Ho < br> < br> David T. Johnson < br> < br> Botagoz Kassymbekova < br> < br> Shai Lavi< br> < br> J& #252; rgen Martschukat< br> < br> Alfred Oehlers < br> < br> Judith Randle< br> < br> Judith Mendelsohn Rood< br> < br> Austin Sarat < br> < br> Patrick Timmons< br> < br> Nicole Tarulevicz < br> < br> Louise Tyler < br> < br> < /div>

Book News Annotation:

In order to understand the death penalty, scholars of the social sciences and law from throughout the industrialized world explore how it is and has been embedded in discourse and symbolic practices in specific times and places. They look at civilization and punishment in Europe and the Americas; state killing and state violence in Central and South Asia and the Middle East; and paternal states, Asian values, and visions of social order in East and Southeast Asia.
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity? In this volume the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty we need to know more about the "cultural lives"—past and present—of the state's ultimate sanction.

Synopsis:

“In fifteen chapters, they [Sarat and Boulanger] take the reader on a capital punishment odyssey through not only the US, but also central and south Asia, the Middle East, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, Singapore, and South Korea. In a nutshell, this is a book well worth reading for those interested in exploring cross-cultural treatments of the death penalty.”&#8212;CHOICE

Synopsis:

How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity?

After centuries during which capital punishment was a normal and self-evident part of criminal punishment, it has now taken on a life of its own in various arenas far beyond the limits of the penal sphere. In this volume, the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty, we need to know more about the "cultural lives"&#8212;past and present&#8212;of the states ultimate sanction.

They undertake this “cultural voyage” comparatively&#8212;examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea&#8212;arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment “lives” or “dies” in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition.

Contributors:

Sangmin Bae

Christian Boulanger

Julia Eckert

Agata Fijalkowski

Evi Girling

Virgil K.Y. Ho

David T. Johnson

Botagoz Kassymbekova

Shai Lavi

J&uuml;rgen Martschukat

Alfred Oehlers

Judith Randle

Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Austin Sarat

Patrick Timmons

Nicole Tarulevicz

Louise Tyler

About the Author

Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science, Amherst College. He is co-author, with Stuart Scheingold, of Something to Believe In: Politics, Professionalism, and Cause Lawyering (Stanford University Press, 2004). Christian Boulanger is Lecturer at the Otto Suhr Institute for Political Science, Free University, Berlin.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780804752343
Editor:
Sarat, Austin
Editor:
Boulanger, Christian
Editor:
Sarat, Austin; Boulanger, Christian
Editor:
Sarat, Austin
Editor:
Boulanger, Christian
Author:
Christian, Boulanger
Author:
Sarat, Austin
Author:
Boulanger, Christian
Author:
Austin Sarat
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Penology
Subject:
Capital punishment
Subject:
Crime-Prisons and Prisoners
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
1
Series:
The Cultural Lives of Law
Publication Date:
20050531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
360
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Crime » Prisons and Prisoners
History and Social Science » Crime » Punishment
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

The Cultural Lives of Capital Punishment: Comparative Perspectives New Trade Paper
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Product details 360 pages Stanford University Press - English 9780804752343 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity? In this volume the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty we need to know more about the "cultural lives"—past and present—of the state's ultimate sanction.
"Synopsis" by ,
“In fifteen chapters, they [Sarat and Boulanger] take the reader on a capital punishment odyssey through not only the US, but also central and south Asia, the Middle East, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, Singapore, and South Korea. In a nutshell, this is a book well worth reading for those interested in exploring cross-cultural treatments of the death penalty.”&#8212;CHOICE
"Synopsis" by ,
How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity?

After centuries during which capital punishment was a normal and self-evident part of criminal punishment, it has now taken on a life of its own in various arenas far beyond the limits of the penal sphere. In this volume, the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty, we need to know more about the "cultural lives"&#8212;past and present&#8212;of the states ultimate sanction.

They undertake this “cultural voyage” comparatively&#8212;examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea&#8212;arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment “lives” or “dies” in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition.

Contributors:

Sangmin Bae

Christian Boulanger

Julia Eckert

Agata Fijalkowski

Evi Girling

Virgil K.Y. Ho

David T. Johnson

Botagoz Kassymbekova

Shai Lavi

J&uuml;rgen Martschukat

Alfred Oehlers

Judith Randle

Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Austin Sarat

Patrick Timmons

Nicole Tarulevicz

Louise Tyler

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