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Other titles in the Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and Islamic Societies and Cultures series:

The Autumn of Dictatorship: Fiscal Crisis and Political Change in Egypt Under Mubarak (Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and I)

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The Autumn of Dictatorship: Fiscal Crisis and Political Change in Egypt Under Mubarak (Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and I) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Egyptian protests in early 2011 took many by surprise. In the days immediately following, commentators wondered openly over the changing situation across the Middle East. But protest is nothing new to Egypt, and labor activism and political activism, most notably the Kifaya (Enough) movement, have increased dramatically over recent years. In hindsight, it is the durability of the Mubarak regime, not its sudden loss of legitimacy that should be more surprising. Though many have turned to social media for explanation of the events, in this book, Samer Soliman follows the age-old adage—follow the money.

Over the last thirty years, the Egyptian state has increasingly given its citizens less money and fewer social benefits while simultaneously demanding more taxes and resources. This has lead to a weakened state—deteriorating public services, low levels of law enforcement, poor opportunities for employment and economic development—while simultaneously inflated the security machine that sustains the authoritarian regime. Studying the regime from the point of view of its deeds rather than its discourse, this book tackles the relationship between fiscal crisis and political change in Egypt.

Ultimately, the Egyptian case is not one of the success of a regime, but the failure of a state. The regime lasted for 30 years because it was able to sustain and reproduce itself, but left an increasingly weakened state, unable to facilitate capitalist development in the country. The resulting financial crisis profoundly changed the socio-economic landscape of the country, and now is paving the way for political change and the emergence of new social forces.

Synopsis:

Examines how and why the Mubarak regime managed to maintain control of Egypt for 30 years despite an ongoing fiscal crisis, and considers the relationship between public finance, politics, and the possibility for social and political change.

Synopsis:

Over the last thirty years, the Egyptian state has increasingly given its citizens less money and benefits while simultaneously asking for more taxes and resources. But contrary to expectations, the resulting fiscal crisis has not brought the country's authoritarian regime to an end. Strong Regime, Weak State examines how Mubarak's political regime has succeeded despite the decline of its revenues, and how affairs between state and society, and across different levels of government, are in turn affected.

Studying the regime based on its deeds rather than its discourse, this book tackles the relationship between public finance and politics in Egypt. Ultimately, the Egyptian case is not one of the success of a regime, but rather the failure of a state. The regime succeeds because it is able to sustain and reproduce itself, but the state fails as it is unable to facilitate capitalist development in the country. As the book reveals, the financial crisis has profoundly changed the socio-economic constituency of the Egyptian regime, and is paving the way for political change and the emergence of new social forces.

About the Author

Samer Soliman is Assistant Professor of Political Economy and Political Science at the American University in Cairo. An activist for human rights and democratic politics, he is also a frequent columnist in the Egyptian media and a founder and editor of Al-Bosla, a radical democratic publication.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780804760003
Author:
Soliman, Samer
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
Author:
Soliman, Samir
Subject:
Practical Politics
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and I
Publication Date:
20110431
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

» Business » Accounting and Finance
» History and Social Science » Politics » General

The Autumn of Dictatorship: Fiscal Crisis and Political Change in Egypt Under Mubarak (Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and I) New Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Stanford University Press - English 9780804760003 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Examines how and why the Mubarak regime managed to maintain control of Egypt for 30 years despite an ongoing fiscal crisis, and considers the relationship between public finance, politics, and the possibility for social and political change.
"Synopsis" by , Over the last thirty years, the Egyptian state has increasingly given its citizens less money and benefits while simultaneously asking for more taxes and resources. But contrary to expectations, the resulting fiscal crisis has not brought the country's authoritarian regime to an end. Strong Regime, Weak State examines how Mubarak's political regime has succeeded despite the decline of its revenues, and how affairs between state and society, and across different levels of government, are in turn affected.

Studying the regime based on its deeds rather than its discourse, this book tackles the relationship between public finance and politics in Egypt. Ultimately, the Egyptian case is not one of the success of a regime, but rather the failure of a state. The regime succeeds because it is able to sustain and reproduce itself, but the state fails as it is unable to facilitate capitalist development in the country. As the book reveals, the financial crisis has profoundly changed the socio-economic constituency of the Egyptian regime, and is paving the way for political change and the emergence of new social forces.

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