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New Directions in Native American Studies #05: Red Power Rising: The National Indian Youth Council and the Origins of Native Activism

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New Directions in Native American Studies #05: Red Power Rising: The National Indian Youth Council and the Origins of Native Activism Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Uncovers the origins of the Red Power movement

During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called Red Power—a civil rights struggle fueled by intertribal activism. While some define the movement as militant and others see it as peaceful, there is one common assumption about its history: Red Power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. Or did it?

In this groundbreaking book, Bradley G. Shreve sets the record straight by tracing the origins of Red Power further back in time: to the student activism of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC), founded in Gallup, New Mexico, in 1961. Unlike other 1960s and ’70s activist groups that challenged the fundamental beliefs of their predecessors, the students who established the NIYC were determined to uphold the cultures and ideals of their elders, building on a tradition of pan-Indian organization dating back to the early twentieth century. Their cornerstone principles of tribal sovereignty, self determination, treaty rights, and cultural preservation helped ensure their survival, for in contrast to other activist groups that came and went, the NIYC is still in operation today. But Shreve also shows that the NIYC was very much a product of 1960s idealistic ferment and its leaders learned tactics from other contemporary leftist movements.

By uncovering the origins of Red Power, Shreve writes an important new chapter in the history of American Indian activism. And by revealing the ideology and accomplishments of the NIYC, he ties the Red Power Movement to the larger struggle for human rights that continues to this day both in the United States and across the globe.

Book News Annotation:

Shreve chronicles the origins of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC) from its cultural and historical underpinnings in 19th century and early 20th century intertribal movements, through its trajectory and activities in the 1960s, and into its legacy with movements such as the American Indian Movement (AIM). The NIYC was a student activist group which possessed the same sense of urgency and purpose as contemporary student groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), but differed from those groups in that it did not rebel against its elders but continued a long tradition of Native values. Those values included support for tribal sovereignty, support for continuation of traditional cultural activities, and the inclusion of women in important leadership roles. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called Red Power—a civil rights struggle fueled by intertribal activism. While some define the movement as militant and others see it as peaceful, there is one common assumption about its history: Red Power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. Or did it?

About the Author

Bradley G. Shreve is Chair of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Din� College in Tsaile, Arizona.

Shirley Hill Witt was a founder and vice president of the National Indian Youth Council. A distinguished anthropologist and former foreign service officer, she is a member of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation, Wolf Clan.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780806141787
Author:
Shreve, Bradley G.
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press
Author:
Witt, Shirley Hill
Subject:
Native American Studies
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Subject:
Native American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
New Directions in Native American Studies series
Series Volume:
5
Publication Date:
20110331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 bandw illus.
Pages:
296
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

New Directions in Native American Studies #05: Red Power Rising: The National Indian Youth Council and the Origins of Native Activism New Hardcover
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Product details 296 pages University of Oklahoma Press - English 9780806141787 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called Red Power—a civil rights struggle fueled by intertribal activism. While some define the movement as militant and others see it as peaceful, there is one common assumption about its history: Red Power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. Or did it?
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