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1 Beaverton Gender Studies- Womens Studies

The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq

by

The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Lonely Soldier--the inspiration for the documentary The Invisible War--vividly tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006--and of the challenges they faced while fighting a war painfully alone.

More American women have fought and died in Iraq than in any war since World War Two, yet as soldiers they are still painfully alone. In Iraq, only one in ten troops is a woman, and she often serves in a unit with few other women or none at all. This isolation, along with the military's deep-seated hostility toward women, causes problems that many female soldiers find as hard to cope with as war itself: degradation, sexual persecution by their comrades, and loneliness, instead of the camaraderie that every soldier depends on for comfort and survival. As one female soldier said, "I ended up waging my own war against an enemy dressed in the same uniform as mine."

In The Lonely Soldier, Benedict tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006. She follows them from their childhoods to their enlistments, then takes them through their training, to war and home again, all the while setting the war's events in context.

We meet Jen, white and from a working-class town in the heartland, who still shakes from her wartime traumas; Abbie, who rebelled against a household of liberal Democrats by enlisting in the National Guard; Mickiela, a Mexican American who grew up with a family entangled in L.A. gangs; Terris, an African American mother from D.C. whose childhood was torn by violence; and Eli PaintedCrow, who joined the military to follow Native American tradition and to escape a life of Faulknerian hardship. Between these stories, Benedict weaves those of the forty other Iraq War veterans she interviewed, illuminating the complex issues of war and misogyny, class, race, homophobia, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Each of these stories is unique, yet collectively they add up to a heartbreaking picture of the sacrifices women soldiers are making for this country.

Benedict ends by showing how these women came to face the truth of war and by offering suggestions for how the military can improve conditions for female soldiers-including distributing women more evenly throughout units and rejecting male recruits with records of violence against women. Humanizing, urgent, and powerful, The Lonely Soldier is a clarion call for change.

Synopsis:

The Lonely Soldier--the inspiration for the documentary The Invisible War--vividly tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006--and of the challenges they faced while fighting a war painfully alone.

More American women have fought and died in Iraq than in any war since World War Two, yet as soldiers they are still painfully alone. In Iraq, only one in ten troops is a woman, and she often serves in a unit with few other women or none at all. This isolation, along with the military's deep-seated hostility toward women, causes problems that many female soldiers find as hard to cope with as war itself: degradation, sexual persecution by their comrades, and loneliness, instead of the camaraderie that every soldier depends on for comfort and survival. As one female soldier said, "I ended up waging my own war against an enemy dressed in the same uniform as mine."

In The Lonely Soldier, Benedict tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006. She follows them from their childhoods to their enlistments, then takes them through their training, to war and home again, all the while setting the war's events in context.

We meet Jen, white and from a working-class town in the heartland, who still shakes from her wartime traumas; Abbie, who rebelled against a household of liberal Democrats by enlisting in the National Guard; Mickiela, a Mexican American who grew up with a family entangled in L.A. gangs; Terris, an African American mother from D.C. whose childhood was torn by violence; and Eli PaintedCrow, who joined the military to follow Native American tradition and to escape a life of Faulknerian hardship. Between these stories, Benedict weaves those of the forty other Iraq War veterans she interviewed, illuminating the complex issues of war and misogyny, class, race, homophobia, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Each of these stories is unique, yet collectively they add up to a heartbreaking picture of the sacrifices women soldiers are making for this country.

Benedict ends by showing how these women came to face the truth of war and by offering suggestions for how the military can improve conditions for female soldiers-including distributing women more evenly throughout units and rejecting male recruits with records of violence against women. Humanizing, urgent, and powerful, The Lonely Soldier is a clarion call for change.

Synopsis:

Already widely covered in the New York Times, the Nation, the American Prospect, and on Huffington Post; adapted as a dramatic performance; and discussed on NPR, NBC, and CBS, The Lonely Soldier vividly tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006--and of the challenges they faced while fighting a war painfully alone.

About the Author

Helen Benedict, a professor of journalism at Columbia University, has written frequently on women, race, and justice. Her books include Virgin or Vamp: How the Press Covers Sex Crimes and the novels The Opposite of Love, The Sailor's Wife, Bad Angel, and A World Like This. Her work on soldiers won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism.

Table of Contents

One. The Lonely Soldier

 

PART ONE

Before

 Two. From Girl to Soldier: Life before the Military

 

Tthree. They Break You Down, Then Build You

Back Up: Mickiela Montoya

 

Four. They Told Us We Were Going to Be Peacekeepers:

Jennifer Spranger

 

Five. The Assault Was Just One Bad Person, but It Was a

Turning Point for Me: Abbie Pickett

 

Six. These Morons Are Going to Get Us Killed:

Terris Dewalt-Johnson

 

Seven. This War Is Full of Crazy People:

Eli PaintedCrow

 

PART TWO

War

Eeight. It’s Pretty Much Just You and Your Rifle:

Jennifer Spranger,

 

Nine. You’re Just Lying There Waiting to See

Who’s Going to Die: Abbie Pickett, –

 

Ten. You Become Hollow, Like a Robot:

Eli PaintedCrow,

 

Eleven. I Wasn’t Carrying the Knife for the Enemy,

I Was Carrying It for the Guys on My Own Side:

Mickiela Montoya,

 

Twelve. Mommy, Love You. Hope You Don’t Get Killed

in Iraq: Terris Dewalt-Johnson, –

 

PART THREE

After

 

Thirteen. Coming Home

 

 Fourteen. Fixing the Future

 

Appendix a. Military Ranks and Organization

Appendix b. Where to Find Help

 Acknowledgments

 Notes

 Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807061497
Author:
Benedict, Helen
Publisher:
Beacon Press (MA)
Subject:
Military - Iraq War (2003-)
Subject:
Military - Veterans
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
General History
Subject:
World History-Iraq War (2003-?)
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.8 in 0.9244 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Military » Gulf Wars
History and Social Science » Military » Iraq War (2003-)
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Violence in Society

The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq Used Trade Paper
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Product details 280 pages Beacon Press - English 9780807061497 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The Lonely Soldier--the inspiration for the documentary The Invisible War--vividly tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006--and of the challenges they faced while fighting a war painfully alone.

More American women have fought and died in Iraq than in any war since World War Two, yet as soldiers they are still painfully alone. In Iraq, only one in ten troops is a woman, and she often serves in a unit with few other women or none at all. This isolation, along with the military's deep-seated hostility toward women, causes problems that many female soldiers find as hard to cope with as war itself: degradation, sexual persecution by their comrades, and loneliness, instead of the camaraderie that every soldier depends on for comfort and survival. As one female soldier said, "I ended up waging my own war against an enemy dressed in the same uniform as mine."

In The Lonely Soldier, Benedict tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006. She follows them from their childhoods to their enlistments, then takes them through their training, to war and home again, all the while setting the war's events in context.

We meet Jen, white and from a working-class town in the heartland, who still shakes from her wartime traumas; Abbie, who rebelled against a household of liberal Democrats by enlisting in the National Guard; Mickiela, a Mexican American who grew up with a family entangled in L.A. gangs; Terris, an African American mother from D.C. whose childhood was torn by violence; and Eli PaintedCrow, who joined the military to follow Native American tradition and to escape a life of Faulknerian hardship. Between these stories, Benedict weaves those of the forty other Iraq War veterans she interviewed, illuminating the complex issues of war and misogyny, class, race, homophobia, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Each of these stories is unique, yet collectively they add up to a heartbreaking picture of the sacrifices women soldiers are making for this country.

Benedict ends by showing how these women came to face the truth of war and by offering suggestions for how the military can improve conditions for female soldiers-including distributing women more evenly throughout units and rejecting male recruits with records of violence against women. Humanizing, urgent, and powerful, The Lonely Soldier is a clarion call for change.

"Synopsis" by , Already widely covered in the New York Times, the Nation, the American Prospect, and on Huffington Post; adapted as a dramatic performance; and discussed on NPR, NBC, and CBS, The Lonely Soldier vividly tells the stories of five women who fought in Iraq between 2003 and 2006--and of the challenges they faced while fighting a war painfully alone.
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