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Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture (Studies in Legal History)

Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture (Studies in Legal History) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"[A] pathbreaking work. . . . [DeLombard] ably integrates the methodologies of literature, history, and law to make a convincing argument that the debate over slavery contributed to the development of print culture in antebellum America. . . . Provides compelling evidence."

-Civil War History "A detailed study of the operation of the law in anti-slavery texts."

-Journal of American Studies "Insightful. . . . Informative. . . . A fruitful examination of the complicated relationship between abolitionist rhetorical practices and African American legal identity."

-Legacy "A worthwhile study which should be of interest to scholars from a range of disciplines including history, legal studies, literature, and American studies."

-Southern Historian "The elegance of the book's unifying legal metaphors and its intensive textual analyses generate fresh insights. . . . An accessible productive analysis that offers a valuable way to conceptualize abolitionism during an era when so many Americans judged arguments for immediate abolition of slavery to be out of order."

-The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society "The depth and breadth of . . . research and discerning literary comments are . . . impressive."

-The Historian "Puts a fresh, legalistic spin on current conventional wisdom among antebellum historians. . . . Provides a rich, nuanced study of popular legal consciousness, racial conflict, and the power of the printed word in antebellum America."

-Law and History Review "Provide[s] us with a broader understanding of the antebellum conflict over the South's peculiar institution and in doing so adds a new dimension to the coming of the Civil War."

-Louisiana History

Synopsis:

America's legal consciousness was high during the era that saw the imprisonment of abolitionist editor William Lloyd Garrison, the execution of slave revolutionary Nat Turner, and the hangings of John Brown and his Harpers Ferry co-conspirators.

Synopsis:

DeLombard examines how debates over slavery in the three decades before the Civil War employed legal language to "try" the case for slavery in the court of public opinion via popular print media. The country's legal consciousness was high during the era that saw the imprisonment of abolitionist editor William Lloyd Garrison, the execution of slave revolutionary Nat Turner, and the hangings of John Brown and his Harpers Ferry coconspirators. DeLombard discusses how this consciousness was evident in the "trials" over slavery found in the autobiographies of Frederick Douglass, a scandal narrative about Sojourner Truth, a speech by Henry David Thoreau, fiction by Harriet Beecher Stowe, and a proslavery novel by William McCreary Burwell.

About the Author

Jeannine Marie DeLombard is associate professor of English at the University of Toronto, where she is affiliated with the Centre for the Study of the United States and the Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807830864
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
Subject:
American - General
Author:
Delombard, Jeannine Marie
Subject:
Legal History
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
History
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Slavery in literature
Subject:
Slavery -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass; Harriet Beecher Stowe; William Lloyd Garrison; Sojourner Truth; John Brown; Harpers Ferry; Nat Turner; antebellum print culture; slavery; abolitionism; public opinion; William McCreary Burwell; slavery debate; racial politics; nineteen
Subject:
Frederick Douglass
Subject:
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Subject:
William Lloyd Garrison
Subject:
Sojourner Truth
Subject:
John Brown
Subject:
Harpers Ferry
Subject:
Nat Turner
Subject:
antebellum print culture
Subject:
abolitionism
Subject:
Public opinion
Subject:
William McCreary Burwell
Subject:
slavery debate
Subject:
racial politics
Subject:
nineteenth-century American literature
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Studies in Legal History
Publication Date:
20070531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.38 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture (Studies in Legal History)
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$ In Stock
Product details 344 pages University of North Carolina Press - English 9780807830864 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , America's legal consciousness was high during the era that saw the imprisonment of abolitionist editor William Lloyd Garrison, the execution of slave revolutionary Nat Turner, and the hangings of John Brown and his Harpers Ferry co-conspirators.
"Synopsis" by , DeLombard examines how debates over slavery in the three decades before the Civil War employed legal language to "try" the case for slavery in the court of public opinion via popular print media. The country's legal consciousness was high during the era that saw the imprisonment of abolitionist editor William Lloyd Garrison, the execution of slave revolutionary Nat Turner, and the hangings of John Brown and his Harpers Ferry coconspirators. DeLombard discusses how this consciousness was evident in the "trials" over slavery found in the autobiographies of Frederick Douglass, a scandal narrative about Sojourner Truth, a speech by Henry David Thoreau, fiction by Harriet Beecher Stowe, and a proslavery novel by William McCreary Burwell.
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