Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | November 29, 2014

    Neil Patrick Harris: IMG Neil Patrick Harris: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer

Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (Gender and American Culture)

Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (Gender and American Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The meaning of race in the antebellum southern United States was anchored in the racial exclusivity of slavery (coded as black) and full citizenship (coded as white as well as male). These traditional definitions of race were radically disrupted after emancipation, when citizenship was granted to all persons born in the United States and suffrage was extended to all men. Hannah Rosen persuasively argues that in this critical moment of Reconstruction, contests over the future meaning of race were often fought on the terrain of gender.

Sexual violence—specifically, white-on-black rape—emerged as a critical arena in postemancipation struggles over African American citizenship. Analyzing the testimony of rape survivors, Rosen finds that white men often staged elaborate attacks meant to enact prior racial hierarchy. Through their testimony, black women defiantly rejected such hierarchy and claimed their new and equal rights. Rosen explains how heated debates over interracial marriage were also attempts by whites to undermine African American men's demands for suffrage and a voice in public affairs. By connecting histories of rape and discourses of "social equality" with struggles over citizenship, Rosen shows how gendered violence and gendered rhetorics of race together produced a climate of terror for black men and women seeking to exercise their new rights as citizens. Linking political events at the city, state, and regional levels, Rosen places gender and sexual violence at the heart of understanding the reconsolidation of race and racism in the postemancipation United States.

About the Author

Hannah Rosen is assistant professor in the Program in American Culture and the Women's Studies Department at the University of Michigan.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807832028
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Author:
Rosen, Hannah
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
Sex role
Subject:
History
Subject:
Sex role -- Southern States -- History.
Subject:
Southern States Race relations History.
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
United States - Reconstruction Period (1865-1877)
Subject:
Women's Studies - History
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction; Emancipation; sexual violence; rape; miscegenation; interracial marriage; citizenship; Reconstruction Acts; Memphis Riot of 1866; Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan; Arkansas; Little Rock; Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868; William H
Subject:
Reconstruction
Subject:
Emancipation
Subject:
Sexual violence.
Subject:
Rape
Subject:
Miscegenation
Subject:
Interracial marriage
Subject:
Citizenship
Subject:
Reconstruction Acts
Subject:
Memphis Riot of 1866
Subject:
Reconstruction-era Ku Klux Klan
Subject:
Arkansas
Subject:
Little Rock
Subject:
Arkansas Constitutional Convention of 1868
Subject:
William Henry Grey
Subject:
Jo
Subject:
hn Bradley
Subject:
Frances Thompson
Subject:
Lucy Smith
Subject:
Lucy Tibbs
Subject:
Rebecca Ann Bloom
Subject:
Harriet Armour
Subject:
Hannah Tutson
Subject:
John Bradley
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Gender and American Culture
Publication Date:
20090231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 illus., 1 map
Pages:
424
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.38 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General

Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South (Gender and American Culture)
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 424 pages University of North Carolina Press - English 9780807832028 Reviews:
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.