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Original Essays | September 4, 2014

Edward E. Baptist: IMG The Two Bodies of The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism



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Other titles in the Gender and American Culture series:

Community of Suffering and Struggle (91 Edition)

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Community of Suffering and Struggle (91 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

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Publisher Comments:

Elizabeth Faue traces the transformation of the American labor movement from community forms of solidarity to bureaucratic unionism. Arguing that gender is central to understanding this shift, Faue explores women's involvement in labor and political organizations and the role of gender and family ideology in shaping unionism in the twentieth century. Her study of Minneapolis, the site of the important 1934 trucking strike, has broad implications for labor history as a whole.

Initially the labor movement rooted itself in community organizations and networks in which women were active, both as members and as leaders. This community orientation reclaimed family, relief, and education as political ground for a labor movement seeking to re-establish itself after the losses of the 1920s. But as the depression deepened, women—perceived as threats to men seeking work—lost their places in union leadership, in working-class culture, and on labor's political agenda. When unions exchanged a community orientation for a focus on the workplace and on national politics, they lost the power to recruit and involve women members, even after World War II prompted large numbers of women to enter the work force.

In a pathbreaking analysis, Faue explores how the iconography and language of labor reflected ideas about gender. The depiction of work and the worker as male; the reliance on sport, military, and familial metaphors for solidarity; and the ideas of women's place—these all reinforced the representation of labor solidarity as masculine during a time of increasing female participation in the labor force. Although the language of labor as male was not new in the depression, the crisis of wage-earning—as a crisis of masculinity—helped to give psychological power to male dominance in the labor culture. By the end of the war, women no longer occupied a central position in organized labor but a peripheral one.

Book News Annotation:

Faue traces the transformation of the American labor movement from community forms of solidarity to bureaucratic unionism. Focusing on Minneapolis, site of the trucking strike of 1934, she argues that women workers, for most of 20th-century history, were either ignored or alienated by a labor movement that failed to acknowledge the connections between productive and reproductive labor and the importance of women's work to the family economy. Paper edition (unseen), $14.95.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-288) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807843079
Author:
Faue, Elizabeth
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
Location:
Chapel Hill :
Subject:
Women
Subject:
History
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
United States - State & Local
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
Labor
Subject:
Labor and laboring classes
Subject:
Depressions
Subject:
Labor - Unions
Subject:
Sex discrimination in employment
Subject:
Depressions -- 1929 -- United States.
Subject:
Sex discrimination in employment -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Subject:
Women labor union members.
Subject:
Women labor union members -- Minnesota -- Minneapolis -- History -- 20th century.
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations - General
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations - Unions
Subject:
American labor movement; solidarity; unions; gender; women; Minneapolis; strike; labor history
Subject:
Women -- Employment -- United States.
Subject:
American labor movement
Subject:
Solidarity
Subject:
unions
Subject:
Gender.
Subject:
Minneapolis
Subject:
strike
Subject:
Labor -- History.
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Gender and American Culture
Series Volume:
9432, 9433, 9434
Publication Date:
May 1991
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
324
Dimensions:
9.07x5.93x.95 in. 1.17 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Labor

Community of Suffering and Struggle (91 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 324 pages University of North Carolina Press - English 9780807843079 Reviews:
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