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Original Essays | September 30, 2014

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Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »

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Hawthorn & Child

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Hawthorn & Child Cover

 

Staff Pick

Hawthorn and Child are London detectives diligently investigating crimes, yet they are a distinctly odd pair. The entire book has an overwhelming feeling of strangeness; even the secondary characters are peculiar and eccentric.  

Ridgway pushes a lot of boundaries, but he does it exceedingly well. Reading this, I had the feeling of being dropped into an already-existing scenario — nothing is explained, only experienced. While unsettling, the format lends itself to the unfolding of surprise after surprise in an innovative way. Each chapter has the clear sense of being inside the narrator's head, with the action being a blend of the character's perspective and the actual truth. The result is more a feeling of "experiencing" this book rather than reading it. I almost wonder if Ridgway knew where this book was going when he started writing; it seems that fresh and unexpected.

It feels more like a collection of short stories, with central characters running throughout, rather than a straight-up novel. The "chapters" are not really connected to each other, but, as much as I hate short stories, that isn't an issue here. There is a real depth to Hawthorn's character; the book glides along quickly and feels hefty enough to be classified as a novel.

Not for the squeamish, parts of Hawthorn and Child are as dark as anything I've come across. But, for a purely novel experience — one that is seriously well done, if slightly bizarre — this is your book.
Recommended by Dianah, Powells.com

Keith Ridgway's Hawthorn and Child is a curious, strange, often delightful work that cannot really be described as a novel in any traditional sense of the word. More a collection of stories or vignettes connected by the two titular characters, the Irish author's ambitious work is humorous, imaginative, and, at times, surprisingly moving. Focusing on the professional and personal lives of a pair of English police detectives (also of different races and sexual orientations), Hawthorn and Child delves into the seedy world of crime, conspiracy, and death — but also geopolitics, love, and relationships. It's a police drama (sans the usual procedural asides but with plenty of the requisite violence and heinousness) but also a story of friends, colleagues, and their lives outside of the beat. Ridgway's prose is staccato and unadorned, but possesses a rhythmic or cadenced quality to it. His imagination is surely a productive one, and some of the book's scenes and settings are entirely unexpected. While not a perfect work, Hawthorn and Child makes up for in charm, creativity, and originality whatever it may lack in cohesiveness and consistency.
Recommended by Jeremy, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A book that redefines our ideas of what a novel can do, Hawthorn & Child breaks every mold. Hilarious and cunning, genuinely eerie and yet peculiarly moving, Hawthorn & Child tosses away our fantasies of resolution in favor of the magic of suspended belief.

Hawthorn and Child are mid-ranking London detectives tasked with finding significance in scattered facts. They are comic ghosts – one white and gay, one black and straight – turning up repeatedly and ineffectively to haunt the scene of some catastrophe or another, appearing and disappearing along with a ghost car, a crime boss, a pickpocket, a dead race-car driver, and a pack of wolves. Mysteries are everywhere, but the biggest of all is our mysterious – and hopeless – compulsion to solve them. In Hawthorn & Child, the trippiest novel New Directions has published in years, the only certainty is that we’ve all misunderstood everything.

Synopsis:

A mind-blowing adventure into a literary fourth dimension: part noir, part London snapshot, all unsettlingly amazing

Synopsis:

Hawthorn and Child are mid-ranking detectives tasked with finding significance in the scattered facts. They appear and disappear in the fragments of this book along with a ghost car, a crime boss, a pick-pocket, a dead racing driver and a pack of wolves. The mysteries are everywhere, but the biggest of all is our mysterious compulsion to solve them.

About the Author

Keith Ridgway is a Dubliner and the author of the award-winning novels The Long Falling, The Parts, and Animals, as well as the collection of stories Standard Time and novella Horses. He lived in North London for eleven years. He now lives somewhere else.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780811221665
Author:
Ridgway, Keith
Publisher:
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Publication Date:
20130931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
20.32 x 12.7 mm

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
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Hawthorn & Child Used Trade Paper
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$10.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages New Directions Publishing Corporation - English 9780811221665 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Hawthorn and Child are London detectives diligently investigating crimes, yet they are a distinctly odd pair. The entire book has an overwhelming feeling of strangeness; even the secondary characters are peculiar and eccentric.  

Ridgway pushes a lot of boundaries, but he does it exceedingly well. Reading this, I had the feeling of being dropped into an already-existing scenario — nothing is explained, only experienced. While unsettling, the format lends itself to the unfolding of surprise after surprise in an innovative way. Each chapter has the clear sense of being inside the narrator's head, with the action being a blend of the character's perspective and the actual truth. The result is more a feeling of "experiencing" this book rather than reading it. I almost wonder if Ridgway knew where this book was going when he started writing; it seems that fresh and unexpected.

It feels more like a collection of short stories, with central characters running throughout, rather than a straight-up novel. The "chapters" are not really connected to each other, but, as much as I hate short stories, that isn't an issue here. There is a real depth to Hawthorn's character; the book glides along quickly and feels hefty enough to be classified as a novel.

Not for the squeamish, parts of Hawthorn and Child are as dark as anything I've come across. But, for a purely novel experience — one that is seriously well done, if slightly bizarre — this is your book.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Keith Ridgway's Hawthorn and Child is a curious, strange, often delightful work that cannot really be described as a novel in any traditional sense of the word. More a collection of stories or vignettes connected by the two titular characters, the Irish author's ambitious work is humorous, imaginative, and, at times, surprisingly moving. Focusing on the professional and personal lives of a pair of English police detectives (also of different races and sexual orientations), Hawthorn and Child delves into the seedy world of crime, conspiracy, and death — but also geopolitics, love, and relationships. It's a police drama (sans the usual procedural asides but with plenty of the requisite violence and heinousness) but also a story of friends, colleagues, and their lives outside of the beat. Ridgway's prose is staccato and unadorned, but possesses a rhythmic or cadenced quality to it. His imagination is surely a productive one, and some of the book's scenes and settings are entirely unexpected. While not a perfect work, Hawthorn and Child makes up for in charm, creativity, and originality whatever it may lack in cohesiveness and consistency.

"Synopsis" by , A mind-blowing adventure into a literary fourth dimension: part noir, part London snapshot, all unsettlingly amazing
"Synopsis" by , Hawthorn and Child are mid-ranking detectives tasked with finding significance in the scattered facts. They appear and disappear in the fragments of this book along with a ghost car, a crime boss, a pick-pocket, a dead racing driver and a pack of wolves. The mysteries are everywhere, but the biggest of all is our mysterious compulsion to solve them.
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