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More copies of this ISBN

Other titles in the Contemporary Ethnography series:

Knowing DIL Das: Stories of a Himalayan Hunter (Contemporary Ethnography)

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Knowing DIL Das: Stories of a Himalayan Hunter (Contemporary Ethnography) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"This rich and complex book is often moving, frequently thought-provoking."--

Book News Annotation:

Alter (anthropology, U. of Pittsburgh), son of missionaries at a colonial hill station in the Himalayas, spent his childhood in the company of an untouchable Indian farmer and hunter Dil Das. Alter returns to conduct anthropological fieldwork but ends up presenting Das's hunting stories, with discussion of the peasant farmer's resistance towards his culture, the limits of culture and history, and the moral ambiguity of inequality.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Dil Das was a poor farmer--an untouchable--living near Mussoorie, a colonial hill station in the Himalayas. As a boy he became acquainted with a number of American missionary children attending a boarding school in town and, over the years, developed close friendships with them and, eventually, with their sons. The basis for these friendships was a common passion for hunting. This passion and the friendships it made possible came to dominate Dil Das's life.When Joseph S. Alter, one of the boys who had hunted with Dil Das, became an adult and a scholar, he set out to write the life history of Dil Das as a way of exploring Garhwali peasant culture. But Alter found his friend uninterested in talking about traditional ethnographic subjects, such as community life, family, or work. Instead, Dil Das spoke almost exclusively about hunting with his American friends--telling endless tales about friendship and hunting that seemed to have nothing to do with peasant culture.When Dil Das died in 1986, Alter put the project away. Years later, he began rereading Dil Das's stories, this time from a completely new perspective. Instead of looking for information about peasant culture, he was able to see that Dil Das was talking against culture. From this viewpoint Dil Das's narrative made sense for precisely those reasons that had earlier seemed to render it useless--his apparent indifference toward details of everyday life, his obsession with hunting, and, above all, his celebration of friendship.To a degree in fact, but most significantly in Dil Das's memory, hunting served to merge his and the missionary boys' identities and, thereby, to supersede and render irrelevant all differences of class, caste, and nationality. For Dil Das the intimate experience of hunting together radically decentered the prevailing structure of power and enabled him to redefine himself outside the framework of normal social classification.Thus, Knowing Dil Das is not about peasant culture but about the limits of culture and history. And it is about the moral ambiguity of writing and living in a field of power where, despite intimacy, self and other are unequal.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-186) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812217124
Author:
Alter, Joseph S.
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press
Location:
Philadelphia :
Subject:
Friendship
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Culture conflict
Subject:
Hunters
Subject:
Garhwåal
Subject:
Ethnology - India - Garhwal
Subject:
Das, Dil
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Contemporary Ethnography
Series Volume:
no. 105-110
Publication Date:
19991031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
212
Dimensions:
9.03x6.03x.61 in. .79 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology

Knowing DIL Das: Stories of a Himalayan Hunter (Contemporary Ethnography) New Trade Paper
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Product details 212 pages University of Pennsylvania Press - English 9780812217124 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Dil Das was a poor farmer--an untouchable--living near Mussoorie, a colonial hill station in the Himalayas. As a boy he became acquainted with a number of American missionary children attending a boarding school in town and, over the years, developed close friendships with them and, eventually, with their sons. The basis for these friendships was a common passion for hunting. This passion and the friendships it made possible came to dominate Dil Das's life.When Joseph S. Alter, one of the boys who had hunted with Dil Das, became an adult and a scholar, he set out to write the life history of Dil Das as a way of exploring Garhwali peasant culture. But Alter found his friend uninterested in talking about traditional ethnographic subjects, such as community life, family, or work. Instead, Dil Das spoke almost exclusively about hunting with his American friends--telling endless tales about friendship and hunting that seemed to have nothing to do with peasant culture.When Dil Das died in 1986, Alter put the project away. Years later, he began rereading Dil Das's stories, this time from a completely new perspective. Instead of looking for information about peasant culture, he was able to see that Dil Das was talking against culture. From this viewpoint Dil Das's narrative made sense for precisely those reasons that had earlier seemed to render it useless--his apparent indifference toward details of everyday life, his obsession with hunting, and, above all, his celebration of friendship.To a degree in fact, but most significantly in Dil Das's memory, hunting served to merge his and the missionary boys' identities and, thereby, to supersede and render irrelevant all differences of class, caste, and nationality. For Dil Das the intimate experience of hunting together radically decentered the prevailing structure of power and enabled him to redefine himself outside the framework of normal social classification.Thus, Knowing Dil Das is not about peasant culture but about the limits of culture and history. And it is about the moral ambiguity of writing and living in a field of power where, despite intimacy, self and other are unequal.
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