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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

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25 Remote Warehouse World History- Medieval and Renaissance

Other titles in the New Cultural Studies series:

Early Modern Visual Culture: Representation, Race, Empire in Renaissance England (New Cultural Studies)

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Early Modern Visual Culture: Representation, Race, Empire in Renaissance England (New Cultural Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An interdisciplinary group of scholars applies the reinterpretive concept of visual culture to the English Renaissance. Bringing attention to the visual issues that have appeared persistently, though often marginally, in the newer criticisms of the last decade, the authors write in a diversity of voices on a range of subjects. Common among them, however, is a concern with the visual technologies that underlie the representation of the body, of race, of nation, and of empire.

Several essays focus on the construction and representation of the human body-including an examination of anatomy as procedure and visual concept, and a look at early cartographic practice to reveal the correspondences between maps and the female body. In one essay, early Tudor portraits are studied to develop theoretical analogies and historical links between verbal and visual portrayal. In another, connections in Tudor-Stuart drama are drawn between the female body and the textiles made by women. A second group of essays considers issues of colonization, empire, and race. They approach a variety of visual materials, including sixteenth-century representations of the New World that helped formulate a consciousness of subjugation; the Drake Jewel and the myth of the Black Emperor as indices of Elizabethan colonial ideology; and depictions of the Queen of Sheba among other black women present in early modern painting. One chapter considers the politics of collecting. The aesthetic and imperial agendas of a Van Dyck portrait are uncovered in another essay, while elsewhere, that same portrait is linked to issues of whiteness and blackness as they are concentrated within the ceremonies and trappings of the Order of the Garter.

All of the essays in Early Modern Visual Culture explore the social context in which paintings, statues, textiles, maps, and other artifacts are produced and consumed. They also explore how those artifacts-and the acts of creating, collecting, and admiring them-are themselves mechanisms for fashioning the body and identity, situating the self within a social order, defining the otherness of race, ethnicity, and gender, and establishing relationships of power over others based on exploration, surveillance, and insight.

Synopsis:

An interdisciplinary group of scholars applies the reinterpretive concept of visual culture to the English Renaissance. Bringing attention to the visual issues that have appeared persistently, though often marginally, in the newer criticisms of the last decade, the authors write in a diversity of voices on a range of subjects. Common among them, however, is a concern with the visual technologies that underlie the representation of the body, of race, of nation, and of empire.Several essays focus on the construction and representation of the human body--including an examination of anatomy as procedure and visual concept, and a look at early cartographic practice to reveal the correspondences between maps and the female body. In one essay, early Tudor portraits are studied to develop theoretical analogies and historical links between verbal and visual portrayal. In another, connections in Tudor-Stuart drama are drawn between the female body and the textiles made by women. A second group of essays considers issues of colonization, empire, and race. They approach a variety of visual materials, including sixteenth-century representations of the New World that helped formulate a consciousness of subjugation; the Drake Jewel and the myth of the Black Emperor as indices of Elizabethan colonial ideology; and depictions of the Queen of Sheba among other black women present in early modern painting. One chapter considers the politics of collecting. The aesthetic and imperial agendas of a Van Dyck portrait are uncovered in another essay, while elsewhere, that same portrait is linked to issues of whiteness and blackness as they are concentrated within the ceremonies and trappings of the Order of the Garter.All of the essays in Early Modern Visual Culture explore the social context in which paintings, statues, textiles, maps, and other artifacts are produced and consumed. They also explore how those artifacts--and the acts of creating, collecting, and admiring them--are themselves mechanisms for fashioning the body and identity, situating the self within a social order, defining the otherness of race, ethnicity, and gender, and establishing relationships of power over others based on exploration, surveillance, and insight.

Synopsis:

A collection of 10 original essays that explore the social context in which paintings, statues, textiles, maps, and other artifacts were produced and consumed in Renaissance England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812217346
Editor:
Erickson, Peter
Editor:
Hulse, Clark
Editor:
Erickson, Peter
Editor:
Hulse, Clark
Author:
Erickson, Peter
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press
Location:
Philadelphia
Subject:
Great britain
Subject:
England
Subject:
Fine Arts
Subject:
Art and society
Subject:
Renaissance
Subject:
Arts, Modern
Subject:
Arts, English.
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
Renaissance -- England.
Subject:
Art and society -- England.
Subject:
World History - Medieval and Renaissance
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series:
New Cultural Studies
Series Volume:
90-21
Publication Date:
20000931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
9.94x7.00x.91 in. 2.18 lbs.

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Europe General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance

Early Modern Visual Culture: Representation, Race, Empire in Renaissance England (New Cultural Studies) New Trade Paper
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Product details 408 pages University of Pennsylvania Press - English 9780812217346 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An interdisciplinary group of scholars applies the reinterpretive concept of visual culture to the English Renaissance. Bringing attention to the visual issues that have appeared persistently, though often marginally, in the newer criticisms of the last decade, the authors write in a diversity of voices on a range of subjects. Common among them, however, is a concern with the visual technologies that underlie the representation of the body, of race, of nation, and of empire.Several essays focus on the construction and representation of the human body--including an examination of anatomy as procedure and visual concept, and a look at early cartographic practice to reveal the correspondences between maps and the female body. In one essay, early Tudor portraits are studied to develop theoretical analogies and historical links between verbal and visual portrayal. In another, connections in Tudor-Stuart drama are drawn between the female body and the textiles made by women. A second group of essays considers issues of colonization, empire, and race. They approach a variety of visual materials, including sixteenth-century representations of the New World that helped formulate a consciousness of subjugation; the Drake Jewel and the myth of the Black Emperor as indices of Elizabethan colonial ideology; and depictions of the Queen of Sheba among other black women present in early modern painting. One chapter considers the politics of collecting. The aesthetic and imperial agendas of a Van Dyck portrait are uncovered in another essay, while elsewhere, that same portrait is linked to issues of whiteness and blackness as they are concentrated within the ceremonies and trappings of the Order of the Garter.All of the essays in Early Modern Visual Culture explore the social context in which paintings, statues, textiles, maps, and other artifacts are produced and consumed. They also explore how those artifacts--and the acts of creating, collecting, and admiring them--are themselves mechanisms for fashioning the body and identity, situating the self within a social order, defining the otherness of race, ethnicity, and gender, and establishing relationships of power over others based on exploration, surveillance, and insight.
"Synopsis" by , A collection of 10 original essays that explore the social context in which paintings, statues, textiles, maps, and other artifacts were produced and consumed in Renaissance England.
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