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25 Remote Warehouse Literary Criticism- General

The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero: Blood, Gender, and Medieval Literature (Middle Ages Series)

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The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero: Blood, Gender, and Medieval Literature (Middle Ages Series) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In examining the relationship between blood and gender persuasively, McCracken offers a compelling and original interpretation. The book not only offers a new examination of an important theme in medieval literature, it makes a significant contribution to our understanding of gender in medieval texts.--Simon Gaunt, King's College, London Succeeds commendably as a feat of scholarship and careful presentation of often highly theoretical ideas.--Medieval Review This interesting comparative study of the relationship between blood and gender in medieval literature considers how blood is associated with cultural values and how those values might be understood in light of blood's ubiquity as a metaphor and literal agent. . . . . Recommended.--Choice In The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero, Peggy McCracken explores the role of blood symbolism in establishing and maintaining the sex-gender systems of medieval culture. Reading a variety of literary texts in relation to historical, medical, and religious discourses about blood, and in the context of anthropological and religious studies, McCracken offers a provocative examination of the ways gendered cultural values were mapped onto blood in the Middle Ages. As McCracken demonstrates, blood is gendered when that of men is prized in stories about battle and that of women is excluded from the public arena in which social and political hierarchies are contested and defined through chivalric contest. In her examination of the conceptualization of familial relationships, she uncovers the privileges that are grounded in gendered definitions of blood relationships. She shows that in narratives about sacrifice a father's relationship to hisson is described as a shared blood, whereas texts about women accused of giving birth to monstrous children define the mother's contribution to conception in terms of corrupted, often menstrual blood. Turning to fictional representations of bloody martyrdom and of eucharistic ritual, McCracken juxtaposes the blood of the wounded guardian of the grail with that of Christ and suggests that the blood from the grail king's wound is characterized in opposition to that of women and Jewish men. Drawing on a range of French and other literary texts, McCracken shows how the dominant ideas about blood in medieval culture point to ways of seeing modern values associated with blood in a new light, and how modern representations in turn suggest new perspectives on medieval perceptions. Peggy McCracken is Associate Professor of French and Women's Studies, University of Michigan. She is author of The Romance of Adultery: Queenship and Sexual Transgression in Old French Literature, also available from the University of Pennsylvania Press.

Synopsis:

In The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero, Peggy McCracken explores the role of blood symbolism in establishing and maintaining the sex-gender systems of medieval culture. Reading a variety of literary texts in relation to historical, medical, and religious discourses about blood, and in the context of anthropological and religious studies, McCracken offers a provocative examination of the ways gendered cultural values were mapped onto blood in the Middle Ages.As McCracken demonstrates, blood is gendered when that of men is prized in stories about battle and that of women is excluded from the public arena in which social and political hierarchies are contested and defined through chivalric contest. In her examination of the conceptualization of familial relationships, she uncovers the privileges that are grounded in gendered definitions of blood relationships. She shows that in narratives about sacrifice a father's relationship to his son is described as a shared blood, whereas texts about women accused of giving birth to monstrous children define the mother's contribution to conception in terms of corrupted, often menstrual blood. Turning to fictional representations of bloody martyrdom and of eucharistic ritual, McCracken juxtaposes the blood of the wounded guardian of the grail with that of Christ and suggests that the blood from the grail king's wound is characterized in opposition to that of women and Jewish men.Drawing on a range of French and other literary texts, McCracken shows how the dominant ideas about blood in medieval culture point to ways of seeing modern values associated with blood in a new light, and how modern representations in turn suggest new perspectives on medieval perceptions.

Synopsis:

"This interesting comparative study of the relationship between blood and gender in medieval literature considers how blood is associated with cultural values and how those values might be understood in light of blood's ubiquity as a metaphor and literal agent. . . . . Recommended."--

Table of Contents

Only women bleed — The amenorrhea of war — The gender of sacrifice — Menstruation and monstrous birth — The scene of parturition — The grail and its hosts — Conclusion : bleeding for love.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812237139
Author:
Mccracken, Peggy
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press
Author:
McCracken, Peggy
Location:
Philadelphia
Subject:
Medieval
Subject:
Literature, medieval
Subject:
Sex role in literature
Subject:
Blood in literature.
Subject:
Literature, Medieval -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Series:
Middle Ages Series
Series Volume:
1
Publication Date:
20030231
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
9.50x6.04x.84 in. .95 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero: Blood, Gender, and Medieval Literature (Middle Ages Series) New Hardcover
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Product details 200 pages University of Pennsylvania Press - English 9780812237139 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In The Curse of Eve, the Wound of the Hero, Peggy McCracken explores the role of blood symbolism in establishing and maintaining the sex-gender systems of medieval culture. Reading a variety of literary texts in relation to historical, medical, and religious discourses about blood, and in the context of anthropological and religious studies, McCracken offers a provocative examination of the ways gendered cultural values were mapped onto blood in the Middle Ages.As McCracken demonstrates, blood is gendered when that of men is prized in stories about battle and that of women is excluded from the public arena in which social and political hierarchies are contested and defined through chivalric contest. In her examination of the conceptualization of familial relationships, she uncovers the privileges that are grounded in gendered definitions of blood relationships. She shows that in narratives about sacrifice a father's relationship to his son is described as a shared blood, whereas texts about women accused of giving birth to monstrous children define the mother's contribution to conception in terms of corrupted, often menstrual blood. Turning to fictional representations of bloody martyrdom and of eucharistic ritual, McCracken juxtaposes the blood of the wounded guardian of the grail with that of Christ and suggests that the blood from the grail king's wound is characterized in opposition to that of women and Jewish men.Drawing on a range of French and other literary texts, McCracken shows how the dominant ideas about blood in medieval culture point to ways of seeing modern values associated with blood in a new light, and how modern representations in turn suggest new perspectives on medieval perceptions.
"Synopsis" by , "This interesting comparative study of the relationship between blood and gender in medieval literature considers how blood is associated with cultural values and how those values might be understood in light of blood's ubiquity as a metaphor and literal agent. . . . . Recommended."--
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