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A Death in Vienna (Mortalis)

by

A Death in Vienna (Mortalis) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1902, elegant Vienna is the city of the new century, the center of discoveries in everything from the writing of music to the workings of the human mind. But now a brutal homicide has stunned its citizens and appears to have bridged the gap between science and the supernatural. Two very different sleuths from opposite ends of the spectrum will need to combine their talents to solve the boggling crime: Detective Oskar Rheinhardt, who is on the cutting edge of modern police work, and his friend Dr. Max Liebermann, a follower of Sigmund Freud and a pioneer on new frontiers of psychology. As a team they must use both hard evidence and intuitive analysis to solve a medium' s mysterious murder — one that couldn't have been committed by anyone alive.

Review:

"British author Tallis (Love Sick) sets his intelligent murder mystery in the stormy, atmospheric Austrian capital at the turn of the 20th century. Psychoanalyst Max Lieberman, a contemporary of Freud's, takes time out of his busy schedule treating hysterics to help his friend Det. Oskar Rheinhardt solve the perplexing case of a beautiful medium found dead in a locked room on the day of her weekly seance. She's left a suicide note and died of a gunshot to the heart, but there's no weapon or bullet in her body. Rheinhardt is certain she's been murdered, and as he interviews each of her clients, he uncovers a number of potential suspects with motive enough for murder-but without the know-how to accomplish this impossible deed. Midway through the investigation, one of the medium's clients is bludgeoned to death in his sleep-also inside a locked room. Despite Rheinhardt's superior sleuthing and Lieberman's keen observational and analytical abilities, the murderer and the key to his modus operandi elude them until help comes from an unlikely source. Tallis convincingly animates Lieberman and Rheinhardt in a picturesque Vienna roiling with cultural and intellectual change." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Provocative and deeply satisfying....A Death in Vienna isn't just a masterfully constructed tale of memory and revenge, it demonstrates that thrillers can be more than entertainment." Detroit Free Press

Review:

"British psychologist Tallis deftly brings to life a city of contrasts, caught between polite manners and virulent anti-Semitism." Library Journal

Review:

"Immensely entertaining, and very clever indeed." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

US

Synopsis:

In 1902, elegant Vienna is the city of the new century, the center of discoveries in everything from the writing of music to the workings of the human mind. But now a brutal homicide has stunned its citizens and appears to have bridged the gap between science and the supernatural. Two very different sleuths from opposite ends of the spectrum will need to combine their talents to solve the boggling crime: Detective Oskar Rheinhardt, who is on the cutting edge of modern police work, and his friend Dr. Max Liebermann, a follower of Sigmund Freud and a pioneer on new frontiers of psychology. As a team they must use both hard evidence and intuitive analysis to solve a medium's mysterious murder-one that couldn't have been committed by anyone alive.

__________________________________________________________

THE MORTALIS DOSSIER- PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLERS: THE CURIOUS CASE OF PROFESSOR SIGMUND F. AND DETECTIVE FICTION

Summertime-the Austrian Alps: A middle-aged doctor, wishing

to forget medicine, turns off the beaten track and begins a strenuous

climb. When he reaches the summit, he sits and contemplates the distant

prospect. Suddenly he hears a voice.

Are you a doctor?

He is not alone. At first, he can't believe that he's being addressed.

He turns and sees a sulky-looking eighteen-year-old. He recognizes

her (she served him his meal the previous evening). Yes, he replies.

I'm a doctor. How did you know that?

She tells him that her nerves are bad, that she needs help.

S ometimes she feels like she can't breathe, and there's a hammering in

her head. And sometimes something very disturbing happens. She sees

things-including a face that fills her with horror. . . .

Well, do you want to know what happens next? I'd be surprised if

you didn't.

We have here all the ingredients of an engaging thriller: an isolated

setting, a strange meeting, and a disconcerting confession.

So where does this particular opening scene come from? A littleknown

work by one of the queens of crime fiction? A lost reel of an

early Hitchcock film, perhaps? Neither. It is in fact a faithful summary

of the first few pages of Katharina by Sigmund Freud, also known as

case study number four in his Studies on Hysteria, co-authored with Josef

Breuer and published in 1895.

It is generally agreed that the detective thriller is a nineteenthcentury

invention, perfected by the holy trinity of Collins, Poe, and

(most importantly) Conan Doyle; however, the genre would have

been quite different had it not been for the oblique influence of psychoanalysis.

The psychological thriller often pays close attention to

personal history-childhood experiences, relationships, and significant

life events-in fact, the very same things that any self-respecting

therapist would want to know about. These days it's almost impossible

to think of the term thriller without mentally inserting the prefix

psychological.

So how did this happen? How did Freud's work come to influence

the development of an entire literary genre? The answer is quite simple.

He had some help-and that help came from the American film

industry.

Now it has to be said that Freud didn't like America. After visiting

America, he wrote: I am very glad I am away from it, and even more

that I don't have to live there. He believed that American food had

given him a gastrointestinal illness, and that his short stay in America

had caused his handwriting to deteriorate. His anti-American sentiments

finally culminated with his famous remark that he considered

America to be a gigantic mistake.

Be that as it may, although Freud didn't like America, America

liked Freud. In fact, America loved him. And nowhere in America was

Freud more loved than in Hollywood.

The special relationship between the film industry and psychoanalysis

began in the 1930s, when many emigre analysts-fleeing

from the Nazis-settled on the West Coast. Entering analysis became

very fashionable among the studio elite, and Hollywood soon

acquired the sobriquet couch canyon. Dr. Ralph Greenson, for

example-a well-known Hollywood analyst-had a patient list that

included the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis,

and Vivien Leigh. And among the many Hollywood directors who

succumbed to Freud's influence was Alfred Hitchcock, whose thrillers

were much more psychological than any that had been filmed before.

In one of his films Freud actually makes an appearance-well, more or

less. I am thinking here of Spellbound, released in 1945, and based on

Francis Beedings's crime novel The House of Dr. Edwardes.

T he producer of Spellbound, David O. Selznick, was himself in

psychoanalysis-as were most of his family-and so enthusiastic was

he about Freud's ideas that he recruited his own analyst to help him

vet the script. Hitchcock's film has everything we expect from a psychological

thriller: a clinical setting, a murder, a man who has lost his

memory, a dream sequence, and a sinewy plot that twists and turns

toward a dramatic climax. That this film owes a large debt to psychoanalysis

is made absolutely clear when a character appears who is-in

all but name-Sigmund Freud: a wise old doctor with a beard, glasses,

and a fantastically hammy Viennese accent.

Since Hitchcock's time, authors and screenwriters have had much

fun playing with the resonances that exist between psychoanalysis and

detection. This kind of writing reached its apotheosis in 1975 with the

publication of Nicholas Meyer's The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, a novel in

which Freud and Sherlock Holmes are brought together to solve the

same case.

The relationship between psychoanalysis and detection was not

lost on Freud. In his Introductory Lectures, for example, there is a passage

in which he stresses how b

About the Author

Frank Tallis is a writer and practicing clinical psychologist. He has published seven non-fiction works (including Changing Minds: The History of Psychotherapy as an Answer to Human Suffering; and Hidden Minds: A History of the Unconscious.) His new novel, Lovesick, is also published by Century.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812977639
Author:
Tallis, Frank
Publisher:
Random House Trade
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Historical
Subject:
Police
Subject:
Psychoanalysts
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Mystery fiction
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Mystery Historical
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Max Liebermann
Publication Date:
20070531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
480
Dimensions:
7.90x5.26x1.02 in. .76 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » Historical

A Death in Vienna (Mortalis) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 480 pages Random House Trade - English 9780812977639 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "British author Tallis (Love Sick) sets his intelligent murder mystery in the stormy, atmospheric Austrian capital at the turn of the 20th century. Psychoanalyst Max Lieberman, a contemporary of Freud's, takes time out of his busy schedule treating hysterics to help his friend Det. Oskar Rheinhardt solve the perplexing case of a beautiful medium found dead in a locked room on the day of her weekly seance. She's left a suicide note and died of a gunshot to the heart, but there's no weapon or bullet in her body. Rheinhardt is certain she's been murdered, and as he interviews each of her clients, he uncovers a number of potential suspects with motive enough for murder-but without the know-how to accomplish this impossible deed. Midway through the investigation, one of the medium's clients is bludgeoned to death in his sleep-also inside a locked room. Despite Rheinhardt's superior sleuthing and Lieberman's keen observational and analytical abilities, the murderer and the key to his modus operandi elude them until help comes from an unlikely source. Tallis convincingly animates Lieberman and Rheinhardt in a picturesque Vienna roiling with cultural and intellectual change." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Provocative and deeply satisfying....A Death in Vienna isn't just a masterfully constructed tale of memory and revenge, it demonstrates that thrillers can be more than entertainment."
"Review" by , "British psychologist Tallis deftly brings to life a city of contrasts, caught between polite manners and virulent anti-Semitism."
"Review" by , "Immensely entertaining, and very clever indeed."
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , In 1902, elegant Vienna is the city of the new century, the center of discoveries in everything from the writing of music to the workings of the human mind. But now a brutal homicide has stunned its citizens and appears to have bridged the gap between science and the supernatural. Two very different sleuths from opposite ends of the spectrum will need to combine their talents to solve the boggling crime: Detective Oskar Rheinhardt, who is on the cutting edge of modern police work, and his friend Dr. Max Liebermann, a follower of Sigmund Freud and a pioneer on new frontiers of psychology. As a team they must use both hard evidence and intuitive analysis to solve a medium's mysterious murder-one that couldn't have been committed by anyone alive.

__________________________________________________________

THE MORTALIS DOSSIER- PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLERS: THE CURIOUS CASE OF PROFESSOR SIGMUND F. AND DETECTIVE FICTION

Summertime-the Austrian Alps: A middle-aged doctor, wishing

to forget medicine, turns off the beaten track and begins a strenuous

climb. When he reaches the summit, he sits and contemplates the distant

prospect. Suddenly he hears a voice.

Are you a doctor?

He is not alone. At first, he can't believe that he's being addressed.

He turns and sees a sulky-looking eighteen-year-old. He recognizes

her (she served him his meal the previous evening). Yes, he replies.

I'm a doctor. How did you know that?

She tells him that her nerves are bad, that she needs help.

S ometimes she feels like she can't breathe, and there's a hammering in

her head. And sometimes something very disturbing happens. She sees

things-including a face that fills her with horror. . . .

Well, do you want to know what happens next? I'd be surprised if

you didn't.

We have here all the ingredients of an engaging thriller: an isolated

setting, a strange meeting, and a disconcerting confession.

So where does this particular opening scene come from? A littleknown

work by one of the queens of crime fiction? A lost reel of an

early Hitchcock film, perhaps? Neither. It is in fact a faithful summary

of the first few pages of Katharina by Sigmund Freud, also known as

case study number four in his Studies on Hysteria, co-authored with Josef

Breuer and published in 1895.

It is generally agreed that the detective thriller is a nineteenthcentury

invention, perfected by the holy trinity of Collins, Poe, and

(most importantly) Conan Doyle; however, the genre would have

been quite different had it not been for the oblique influence of psychoanalysis.

The psychological thriller often pays close attention to

personal history-childhood experiences, relationships, and significant

life events-in fact, the very same things that any self-respecting

therapist would want to know about. These days it's almost impossible

to think of the term thriller without mentally inserting the prefix

psychological.

So how did this happen? How did Freud's work come to influence

the development of an entire literary genre? The answer is quite simple.

He had some help-and that help came from the American film

industry.

Now it has to be said that Freud didn't like America. After visiting

America, he wrote: I am very glad I am away from it, and even more

that I don't have to live there. He believed that American food had

given him a gastrointestinal illness, and that his short stay in America

had caused his handwriting to deteriorate. His anti-American sentiments

finally culminated with his famous remark that he considered

America to be a gigantic mistake.

Be that as it may, although Freud didn't like America, America

liked Freud. In fact, America loved him. And nowhere in America was

Freud more loved than in Hollywood.

The special relationship between the film industry and psychoanalysis

began in the 1930s, when many emigre analysts-fleeing

from the Nazis-settled on the West Coast. Entering analysis became

very fashionable among the studio elite, and Hollywood soon

acquired the sobriquet couch canyon. Dr. Ralph Greenson, for

example-a well-known Hollywood analyst-had a patient list that

included the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis,

and Vivien Leigh. And among the many Hollywood directors who

succumbed to Freud's influence was Alfred Hitchcock, whose thrillers

were much more psychological than any that had been filmed before.

In one of his films Freud actually makes an appearance-well, more or

less. I am thinking here of Spellbound, released in 1945, and based on

Francis Beedings's crime novel The House of Dr. Edwardes.

T he producer of Spellbound, David O. Selznick, was himself in

psychoanalysis-as were most of his family-and so enthusiastic was

he about Freud's ideas that he recruited his own analyst to help him

vet the script. Hitchcock's film has everything we expect from a psychological

thriller: a clinical setting, a murder, a man who has lost his

memory, a dream sequence, and a sinewy plot that twists and turns

toward a dramatic climax. That this film owes a large debt to psychoanalysis

is made absolutely clear when a character appears who is-in

all but name-Sigmund Freud: a wise old doctor with a beard, glasses,

and a fantastically hammy Viennese accent.

Since Hitchcock's time, authors and screenwriters have had much

fun playing with the resonances that exist between psychoanalysis and

detection. This kind of writing reached its apotheosis in 1975 with the

publication of Nicholas Meyer's The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, a novel in

which Freud and Sherlock Holmes are brought together to solve the

same case.

The relationship between psychoanalysis and detection was not

lost on Freud. In his Introductory Lectures, for example, there is a passage

in which he stresses how b

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