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Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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On God: An Uncommon Conversation

by

On God: An Uncommon Conversation Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A towering figure in American literature, Norman Mailer has in recent years reached a new level of accessibility and power. His last novel, The Castle in the Forest, revealed fascinating ideas about faith and the nature of good and evil. Now Mailer offers his concept of the nature of God. His conversations with his friend and literary executor, Michael Lennon, show this writer at his most direct, provocative, and challenging. I think, writes Mailer, that piety is oppressive. It takes all the air out of thought.

In moving, amusing, probing, and uncommon dialogues conducted over three years but whose topics he has considered for decades, Mailer establishes his own system of belief, one that rejects both organized religion and atheism. He presents instead a view of our world as one created by an artistic God who often succeeds but can also fail in the face of determined opposition by contrary powers in the universe, with whom war is waged for the souls of humans. In turn, we have been given freedom-indeed responsibility-to choose our own paths. Mailer trusts that our individual behavior-always a complex mix of good and evil-will be rewarded or punished with a reincarnation that fits the sum of our lives.

Mailer weighs the possibilities of intelligent design at the same time avowing that sensual pleasures were bestowed on us by God; he finds fault with the Ten Commandments-because adultery, he avers, may be a lesser evil than others suffered in a bad marriage-and he holds that technology was the Devil's most brilliant creation.

In short, Mailer is original and unpredictable in this inspiring verbal journey, a unique vision of the world in which God needs us as much aswe need God.

From The Naked and the Dead to The Executioner's Song and beyond, Mailer's major works have engaged such themes as war, politics, culture, and sex. Now, in this small yet important book, Mailer, in a modest, well-spoken style, gives us fresh ways to think about the largest subject of them all.

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

In this collection of moving, amusing, probing, and uncommon dialogues, Mailer establishes his own system of belief, one that rejects both organized religion and atheism and presents instead a view of the world as one created by an artistic God.

Synopsis:

Born in 1923 in Long Branch, New Jersey, and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Norman Mailer was one of the most influential writers of the second half of the twentieth century and a leading public intellectual for nearly sixty years. He is the author of more than thirty books. The Castle in the Forest, his last novel, was his eleventh New York Times bestseller. His first novel, The Naked and the Dead, has never gone out of print. His 1968 nonfiction narrative, The Armies of the Night, won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. He won a second Pulitzer for The Executioner’s Song and is the only person to have won Pulitzers in both fiction and nonfiction. Five of his books were nominated for National Book Awards, and he won a lifetime achievement award from the National Book Foundation in 2005. Mr. Mailer died in 2007 in New York City.

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

The final book from Norman Mailer, towering figure of American literature, in which he offers his concept of the nature of God

“I feel no attachment, whatsoever, to organized religion” wrote Norman Mailer. “I see God, rather, as a Creator, as the greatest artist. I see human beings as His most developed artworks.” And in this collection of moving, amusing, probing, and uncommon dialogues conducted over three years before his death, Mailer establishes his own system of belief, one that rejects both organized religion and atheism. He presents instead a view of our world as one created by an artistic God who often succeeds but can also fail in the face of determined opposition by contrary powers in the universe with whom war is waged for the souls of humans. Mailer weighs the possibilities of “intelligent design,” at the same time avowing that sensual pleasures were bestowed on us by God; he finds fault with the Ten Commandments-because adultery, he avers, may be a lesser evil than others suffered in a bad marriage; and he holds that technology was the Devils most brilliant creation. In short, Mailer is original and unpredictable in this inspiring verbal journey, in which “God needs us as much as we need God."

Praise for On God:

“[Displays] the glory of an original mind in full provocation.”

-USA Today

“[Mailers] theology is not theoretical to him. After eight decades, it is what he believes. He expects no adherents, and does not profess to be a prophet, but he has worked to forge his beliefs into a coherent catechism.”

-New York

“At once illuminating and exciting . . . a chance to see Mailers intellect as well as his lively conversational style of speech.”

-American Jewish Life

About the Author

Norman Mailer was born in 1923 in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955, he was one of the co-founders of The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioners Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlots Ghost; Oswalds Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest. Mr. Mailer passed away Saturday November 10th, 2007.

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812979404
Author:
Mailer, Norman
Publisher:
Random House Trade
With:
Lennon, Michael
Author:
Lennon, Michael
Author:
Lennon, J. Michael
Subject:
Agnosticism
Subject:
Christian Theology - General
Subject:
God
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
Theology
Subject:
Religion Eastern-Philosophy General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20081131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7.92x5.28x.63 in. .43 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » Philosophy General
Religion » Western Religions » Theology

On God: An Uncommon Conversation Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.98 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Random House Trade - English 9780812979404 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this collection of moving, amusing, probing, and uncommon dialogues, Mailer establishes his own system of belief, one that rejects both organized religion and atheism and presents instead a view of the world as one created by an artistic God.
"Synopsis" by , Born in 1923 in Long Branch, New Jersey, and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Norman Mailer was one of the most influential writers of the second half of the twentieth century and a leading public intellectual for nearly sixty years. He is the author of more than thirty books. The Castle in the Forest, his last novel, was his eleventh New York Times bestseller. His first novel, The Naked and the Dead, has never gone out of print. His 1968 nonfiction narrative, The Armies of the Night, won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. He won a second Pulitzer for The Executioner’s Song and is the only person to have won Pulitzers in both fiction and nonfiction. Five of his books were nominated for National Book Awards, and he won a lifetime achievement award from the National Book Foundation in 2005. Mr. Mailer died in 2007 in New York City.

From the Hardcover edition.

"Synopsis" by , The final book from Norman Mailer, towering figure of American literature, in which he offers his concept of the nature of God

“I feel no attachment, whatsoever, to organized religion” wrote Norman Mailer. “I see God, rather, as a Creator, as the greatest artist. I see human beings as His most developed artworks.” And in this collection of moving, amusing, probing, and uncommon dialogues conducted over three years before his death, Mailer establishes his own system of belief, one that rejects both organized religion and atheism. He presents instead a view of our world as one created by an artistic God who often succeeds but can also fail in the face of determined opposition by contrary powers in the universe with whom war is waged for the souls of humans. Mailer weighs the possibilities of “intelligent design,” at the same time avowing that sensual pleasures were bestowed on us by God; he finds fault with the Ten Commandments-because adultery, he avers, may be a lesser evil than others suffered in a bad marriage; and he holds that technology was the Devils most brilliant creation. In short, Mailer is original and unpredictable in this inspiring verbal journey, in which “God needs us as much as we need God."

Praise for On God:

“[Displays] the glory of an original mind in full provocation.”

-USA Today

“[Mailers] theology is not theoretical to him. After eight decades, it is what he believes. He expects no adherents, and does not profess to be a prophet, but he has worked to forge his beliefs into a coherent catechism.”

-New York

“At once illuminating and exciting . . . a chance to see Mailers intellect as well as his lively conversational style of speech.”

-American Jewish Life

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