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Other titles in the Critical Issues in Health and Medicine series:

Saving Sickly Children: The Tuberculosis Preventorium in American Life, 1909-1970 (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine)

Saving Sickly Children: The Tuberculosis Preventorium in American Life, 1909-1970 (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Classrooms and Clinics is the first book-length assessment of the development of public school health policies from the late nineteenth century through the early years of the Great Depression. Richard A. Meckel examines the efforts of early twentieth-century child health care advocates and reformers to utilize urban schools to deliver health care services to socioeconomically disadvantaged and medically underserved children in the primary grades. Their goal, Meckel shows, was to improve the childrenandrsquo;s health and thereby improve their academic performance.

Meckel situates these efforts within a larger late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century public discourse relating schools and schooling, especially in cities and towns, to child health. He describes and explains how that discourse and the school hygiene movement it inspired served as critical sites for the constructive negotiation of the nature and extent of the public schoolandrsquo;sandmdash;and by extension the stateandrsquo;sandmdash;responsibility for protecting and promoting the physical and mental health of the children for whom it was providing a compulsory education.

Tracing the evolution of that negotiation through four overlapping stages, Meckel shows how, why, and by whom the health of schoolchildren was discursively constructed as a sociomedical problem and charts and explains the changes that construction underwent over time.and#160; He also connects the changes in problem construction to the design and implementation of various interventions and services and evaluates how that design and implementation were affected by the response of the civic, parental, professional, educational, public health, and social welfare groups that considered themselves stakeholders and took part in the discourse. And, most significantly, he examines the responses called forth by the question at the heart of the negotiations: what services are necessitated by the stateandrsquo;s and schoolandrsquo;s taking responsibility for protecting and promoting the health and physical and mental development of schoolchildren.and#160; He concludes that the negotiations resulted both in the partial medicalization of American primary education and in the articulation and adoption of a school health policy that accepted the schoolandrsquo;s responsibility for protecting and promoting the health of its students while largely limiting the services called for to the preventive and educational.

Synopsis:

In this book, Cynthia A. Connolly provides a provocative analysis of public health and family welfare through the lens of the tuberculosis preventorium. This unique facility was intended to prevent TB in indigent children from families labeled irresponsible or at risk for developing the disease. Yet, it also held deeply rooted assumptions about class, race, and ethnicity. Connolly goes further to explain how the child-saving themes embedded in the preventorium movement continue to shape children's health care delivery and family policy in the United States.

Synopsis:

Classrooms and Clinics is the first book-length assessment of the development of public school health policies from the late nineteenth century through the early years of the Great Depression. Richard A. Meckel examines the efforts of early twentieth-century child health care advocates and reformers to utilize urban schools to deliver health care services to socioeconomically disadvantaged and medically underserved children in the primary grades to improve childrenandrsquo;s health and thereby improve their academic performance.

Synopsis:

Known as andquot;The Great Killerandquot; and andquot;The White Plague,andquot; few diseases influenced American life as much as tuberculosis. Sufferers migrated to mountain or desert climates believed to ameliorate symptoms. Architects designed homes with sleeping porches and verandas so sufferers could spend time in the open air. The disease even developed its own consumer culture complete with invalid beds, spittoons, sputum collection devices, and disinfectants. The andquot;preventorium,andquot; an institution designed to protect children from the ravages of the disease, emerged in this era of Progressive ideals in public health.

In this book, Cynthia A. Connolly provides a provocative analysis of public health and family welfare through the lens of the tuberculosis preventorium. This unique facility was intended to prevent TB in indigent children from families labeled irresponsible or at risk for developing the disease. Yet, it also held deeply rooted assumptions about class, race, and ethnicity. Connolly goes further to explain how the child-saving themes embedded in the preventorium movement continue to shape children's health care delivery and family policy in the United States.

About the Author

CYNTHIA A. CONNOLLY is an associate professor of nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

Table of Contents

and#160;Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Going to School, Getting Sick: Mass Education and the Construction of School Diseases

2. Incubators of Epidemics: Contagious Disease and the Origins of Medical Inspection

3. Defective Children, Defective Students: Medicalizing Academic Failure

4. Building Up the Malnourished, the Weakly, and the Vulnerable: Penny Lunches and Open-Air Schools

5. From Coercion to Clinics: The Contested Quest to Ensure Treatment

6. The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: Expansion and Reorientation in the Postwar Era

Epilogue: Contraction, Renovation, and Revival

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813542676
Subtitle:
The Tuberculosis Preventorium in American Life, 1909-1970
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Connolly, Cynthia A.
Author:
Meckel, Richard A.
Subject:
Children
Subject:
History
Subject:
Health Care Delivery
Subject:
Infectious Diseases
Subject:
History, 20th Century - United States
Subject:
Child -- United States.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-History of Medicine
Subject:
Public Health
Subject:
19th and 20th century school hygiene movement
Subject:
schools and state responsibility to provide health care to the nation u2019s young
Subject:
history of child health care and child health care policy
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Critical Issues in Health and Medicine
Publication Date:
20140314
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 illustrations
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties

Saving Sickly Children: The Tuberculosis Preventorium in American Life, 1909-1970 (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine)
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$ In Stock
Product details 200 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813542676 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this book, Cynthia A. Connolly provides a provocative analysis of public health and family welfare through the lens of the tuberculosis preventorium. This unique facility was intended to prevent TB in indigent children from families labeled irresponsible or at risk for developing the disease. Yet, it also held deeply rooted assumptions about class, race, and ethnicity. Connolly goes further to explain how the child-saving themes embedded in the preventorium movement continue to shape children's health care delivery and family policy in the United States.
"Synopsis" by ,

Classrooms and Clinics is the first book-length assessment of the development of public school health policies from the late nineteenth century through the early years of the Great Depression. Richard A. Meckel examines the efforts of early twentieth-century child health care advocates and reformers to utilize urban schools to deliver health care services to socioeconomically disadvantaged and medically underserved children in the primary grades to improve childrenandrsquo;s health and thereby improve their academic performance.

"Synopsis" by ,
Known as andquot;The Great Killerandquot; and andquot;The White Plague,andquot; few diseases influenced American life as much as tuberculosis. Sufferers migrated to mountain or desert climates believed to ameliorate symptoms. Architects designed homes with sleeping porches and verandas so sufferers could spend time in the open air. The disease even developed its own consumer culture complete with invalid beds, spittoons, sputum collection devices, and disinfectants. The andquot;preventorium,andquot; an institution designed to protect children from the ravages of the disease, emerged in this era of Progressive ideals in public health.

In this book, Cynthia A. Connolly provides a provocative analysis of public health and family welfare through the lens of the tuberculosis preventorium. This unique facility was intended to prevent TB in indigent children from families labeled irresponsible or at risk for developing the disease. Yet, it also held deeply rooted assumptions about class, race, and ethnicity. Connolly goes further to explain how the child-saving themes embedded in the preventorium movement continue to shape children's health care delivery and family policy in the United States.

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