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This title in other editions

Facing the Khmer Rouge: A Cambodian Journey (Genocide, Political Violence, Human Rights Genocide, Politic)

by

Facing the Khmer Rouge: A Cambodian Journey (Genocide, Political Violence, Human Rights Genocide, Politic) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Yiddish-speaking Jews thought Cuba was supposed to be a mere layover on the journey to the United States when they arrived in the island country in the 1920s. They even called it andldquo;Hotel Cuba.andrdquo; But then the years passed, and the many Jews who came there from Turkey, Poland, and war-torn Europe stayed in Cuba. The beloved island ceased to be a hotel, and Cuba eventually became andldquo;home.andrdquo; But after Fidel Castro came to power in 1959, the majority of the Jews opposed his communist regime and left in a mass exodus. Though they remade their lives in the United States, they mourned the loss of the Jewish community they had built on the island.

As a child of five, Ruth Behar was caught up in the Jewish exodus from Cuba. Growing up in the United States, she wondered about the Jews who stayed behind. Who were they and why had they stayed? What traces were left of the Jewish presence, of the cemeteries, synagogues, and Torahs? Who was taking care of this legacy? What Jewish memories had managed to survive the years of revolutionary atheism?

An Island Called Home is the story of Beharandrsquo;s journey back to the island to find answers to these questions. Unlike the exotic image projected by the American media, Behar uncovers a side of Cuban Jews that is poignant and personal. Her moving vignettes of the individuals she meets are coupled with the sensitive photographs of Havana-based photographer Humberto Mayol, who traveled with her.

Together, Beharandrsquo;s poetic and compassionate prose and Mayolandrsquo;s shadowy and riveting photographs create an unforgettable portrait of a community that many have seen though few have understood. This book is the first to show both the vitality and the heartbreak that lie behind the project of keeping alive the flame of Jewish memory in Cuba.

Reader Guide (#LINKedu/pages/behar_reader_guide.aspx>#)

Synopsis:

Genocide not only annihilates people but also destroys and reorganizes social relations, using terror as a method. In Genocide as Social Practice, Argentinean social scientist Daniel Feierstein looks at the policies of state-sponsored repression pursued by the Argentine military dictatorship against political opponents between 1976 and 1983 and those pursued by the Third Reich between 1933 and 1945. He finds similarities, not in the extent of the horror but in terms of the goals of the perpetrators.

Synopsis:

Ruth Beharandrsquo;s An Island Called Home is a kaddish, an offering, dedicated to the exiles and to the children of the exiles and for those wandering still, searching for their homes. May they andlsquo;not be given up for lost.

Synopsis:

Why are some cases of genocide prominently remembered while others are ignored, hidden, or denied? In this collection, contributors approach the question from a variety of perspectives and case studies, including the suppression of discussion about indigenous populations in the Americas and Australia, the reasons why the genocide of the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks long remained out of sight, and the violence that was the precursor to and the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Synopsis:

Circassia was a small independent nation on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea. For no reason other than ethnic hatred, over the course of hundreds of raids the Russians drove the Circassians from their homeland and deported them to the Ottoman Empire. At least 600,000 people lost their lives to massacre, starvation, and the elements while hundreds of thousands more were forced to leave their homeland. By 1864, three-fourths of the population was annihilated, and the Circassians had become one of the first stateless peoples in modern history.

Using rare archival materials, Walter Richmond chronicles the history of the war, describes in detail the final genocidal campaign, and follows the Circassians in diaspora through five generations as they struggle to survive and return home. He places the periods of acute genocide, 1821–1822 and 1863–1864, in the larger context of centuries of tension between the two nations and updates the story to the present day as the Circassian community works to gain international recognition of the genocide as the region prepares for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, the site of the Russians’ final victory.

Synopsis:

As a child growing up in Cambodia, Ronnie Yimsut played among the ruins of the Angkor Wat temples, surrounded by a close-knit community. As the Khmer Rouge gained power and began its genocidal reign of terror, his life became a nightmare. In this stunning memoir, Yimsut describes how, in the wake of death and destruction, he decides to live.

Escaping the turmoil of Cambodia, he makes a perilous journey through the jungle into Thailand, only to be sent to a notorious Thai prison. Fortunately, he is able to reach a refugee camp and ultimately migrate to the United States, where he attended the University of Oregon and became an influential leader in the community of Cambodian immigrants. Facing the Khmer Rouge shows Ronnie Yimsutandrsquo;s personal quest to rehabilitate himself, make a new life in America, and then return to Cambodia to help rebuild the land of his birth.

About the Author

RANACHITH (RONNIE) YIMSUT is an author and activist and has been the subject of independent documentary films and reports by CBS News, NBC News, and PBS, among others. His many written works include Journey to Freedom and In the Shadow of Angkor. A senior landscape architect for the USDA Forest Service, he is also involved in national and international NGOs, including Project Enlighten, through which he is working with Bakong Technical College in his native Siem Reap.

Table of Contents

 Foreword

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Bridging the Gap between Two Genocides

Part One: Some Theoretical Questions

1. Defining the Concept of Genocide

2. Toward a Typology of Genocidal Practices

3. Reconciling the Contradictions of Modernity: Equality, Sovereignty, Autonomy, and Genocidal Practices

Part Two: Historical Foundations: The Nazi Genocide

4. Discourse and Politics in Holocaust Studies: Uniqueness, Comparability, and Narration

5. The Problem of Explaining the Causes of the Nazi Genocides

6. Reshaping Social Relations through Genocide

Part Three: Toward a Historical Basis: Genocidal Social Practices in Argentina

7. Explaining Genocidal Social Practices in Argentina: The Problem of Causation

8. Toward a Periodization of Genocide in Argentina

9. Concentration Camp Logic

10. In Conclusion: The Uses of Memory

Notes 

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813551524
Author:
Yimsut, Ronnie
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Thomas La Pointe
Author:
Mayol, Humberto
Author:
Elisa von Joeden-Forgey
Author:
Hegburg, Krista
Author:
Town, Douglas Andrew
Author:
Moses, A. Dirk
Author:
Behar, Ruth
Author:
Chandler, David P.
Author:
Irvin-Erickson, Douglas
Author:
Frieze, Donna-Lee
Author:
Hinton, Alexander Laban
Author:
Richmond, Walter
Author:
Von Joeden-Forgey, Elisa
Author:
Savin, David
Author:
Jones, Adam
Author:
Lapointe, Thomas
Author:
Feierstein, Daniel
Author:
Nunpa, Mato
Author:
Travis, Hannibal
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
jProcesses of remembering and forgetting
Subject:
Canadian Museum of Human Rights
Subject:
suppression of discussion about genocide events
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Genocide, Political Violence, Human Rights
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 family tree, 2 maps
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » World History » Southeast Asia

Facing the Khmer Rouge: A Cambodian Journey (Genocide, Political Violence, Human Rights Genocide, Politic) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813551524 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Genocide not only annihilates people but also destroys and reorganizes social relations, using terror as a method. In Genocide as Social Practice, Argentinean social scientist Daniel Feierstein looks at the policies of state-sponsored repression pursued by the Argentine military dictatorship against political opponents between 1976 and 1983 and those pursued by the Third Reich between 1933 and 1945. He finds similarities, not in the extent of the horror but in terms of the goals of the perpetrators.

"Synopsis" by ,
Ruth Beharandrsquo;s An Island Called Home is a kaddish, an offering, dedicated to the exiles and to the children of the exiles and for those wandering still, searching for their homes. May they andlsquo;not be given up for lost.
"Synopsis" by ,

Why are some cases of genocide prominently remembered while others are ignored, hidden, or denied? In this collection, contributors approach the question from a variety of perspectives and case studies, including the suppression of discussion about indigenous populations in the Americas and Australia, the reasons why the genocide of the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks long remained out of sight, and the violence that was the precursor to and the aftermath of the Holocaust.

"Synopsis" by ,
Circassia was a small independent nation on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea. For no reason other than ethnic hatred, over the course of hundreds of raids the Russians drove the Circassians from their homeland and deported them to the Ottoman Empire. At least 600,000 people lost their lives to massacre, starvation, and the elements while hundreds of thousands more were forced to leave their homeland. By 1864, three-fourths of the population was annihilated, and the Circassians had become one of the first stateless peoples in modern history.

Using rare archival materials, Walter Richmond chronicles the history of the war, describes in detail the final genocidal campaign, and follows the Circassians in diaspora through five generations as they struggle to survive and return home. He places the periods of acute genocide, 1821–1822 and 1863–1864, in the larger context of centuries of tension between the two nations and updates the story to the present day as the Circassian community works to gain international recognition of the genocide as the region prepares for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, the site of the Russians’ final victory.

"Synopsis" by ,

As a child growing up in Cambodia, Ronnie Yimsut played among the ruins of the Angkor Wat temples, surrounded by a close-knit community. As the Khmer Rouge gained power and began its genocidal reign of terror, his life became a nightmare. In this stunning memoir, Yimsut describes how, in the wake of death and destruction, he decides to live.

Escaping the turmoil of Cambodia, he makes a perilous journey through the jungle into Thailand, only to be sent to a notorious Thai prison. Fortunately, he is able to reach a refugee camp and ultimately migrate to the United States, where he attended the University of Oregon and became an influential leader in the community of Cambodian immigrants. Facing the Khmer Rouge shows Ronnie Yimsutandrsquo;s personal quest to rehabilitate himself, make a new life in America, and then return to Cambodia to help rebuild the land of his birth.

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