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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States series:

Zapotecs on the Move: Cultural, Social, and Political Processes in Transnational Prespective (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States)

by

Zapotecs on the Move: Cultural, Social, and Political Processes in Transnational Prespective (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Becoming Mexipino is a social-historical interpretation of two ethnic groups, one Mexican, the other Filipino, whose paths led both groups to San Diego, California. Rudy Guevarra traces the earliest interactions of both groups with Spanish colonialism to illustrate how these historical ties and cultural bonds laid the foundation for what would become close interethnic relationships and communities in twentieth-century San Diego as well as in other locales throughout California and the Pacific West Coast.

Through racially restrictive covenants and other forms of discrimination, both groups, regardless of their differences, were confined to segregated living spaces along with African Americans, other Asian groups, and a few European immigrant clusters. Within these urban multiracial spaces, Mexicans and Filipinos coalesced to build a world of their own through family and kin networks, shared cultural practices, social organizations, and music and other forms of entertainment. They occupied the same living spaces, attended the same Catholic churches, and worked together creating labor cultures that reinforced their ties, often fostering marriages. Mexipino children, living simultaneously in two cultures, have forged a new identity for themselves. and#160;Their lives are the lens through which these two communities are examined, revealing the ways in which Mexicans and Filipinos interacted over generations to produce this distinct and instructive multiethnic experience. Using archival sources, oral histories, newspapers, and personal collections and photographs, Guevarra defines the niche that this particular group carved out for itself.

Synopsis:

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalaltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez examines the impact of international migration on this community, tracing five decades of migration to Los Angeles to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the U.S.

Synopsis:

In this innovative new study, Laura Halperin examines literary representations of harm inflicted on Latinas’ minds and bodies, and on the places Latinas inhabit, but she also explores how hope can be found amid so much harm. Analyzing contemporary memoirs and novels by Irene Vilar, Loida Maritza Pérez, Ana Castillo, Cristina García, and Julia Alvarez, she argues that the individual harm experienced by Latinas needs to be understood in relation to the collective histories of aggression against their communities. 
 

Synopsis:

Central to contemporary debates in the United States on migration and migrant policy is the idea of citizenship, andandmdash;as apparent in the continued debate over Arizonaandrsquo;s immigration law SB 1070andmdash;this issue remains a focal point of contention, with a key concern being whether there should be a path to citizenship for andldquo;undocumentedandrdquo; migrants. In Disenchanting Citizenship, Luis F. B. Plascencia examines two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrantsandrsquo; position in the United States. and#160;

The book explores the meaning of U.S. citizenship through the experience of a unique group of Mexican migrants who were granted Temporary Status under the andldquo;legalizationandrdquo; provisions of the 1986 IRCA, attained Lawful Permanent Residency, and later became U.S. citizens. Plascencia integrates an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis in examining efforts that promote the acquisition of citizenship, the teaching of citizenship classes, and naturalization ceremonies. Ultimately, he unearths citizenshipandrsquo;s root as a Janus-faced construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to the migrant experience, arguing that the acquisition of citizenship can lead to disenchantment with the very status desired. In the end, Plascencia expands our understanding of the dynamics of U.S. citizenship as a form of membership and belonging.

Synopsis:

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalandaacute;ltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, this book examines the impact of international migration on this community. It traces five decades of migration to Los Angeles in order to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the United States, exploring why these immigrants and their descendents now think of themselves as Mexican, Mexican Indian immigrants, Oaxaqueandntilde;os, and Latinosandmdash;identities they did not claim in Mexico.

Based on multi-site fieldwork conducted over a five-year period, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez analyzes how and why Yalandaacute;lag Zapotec identity and culture have been reconfigured in the United States, using such cultural practices as music, dance, and religious rituals as a lens to bring this dynamic process into focus. By illustrating the sociocultural, economic, and political practices that link immigrants in Los Angeles to those left behind, the book documents how transnational migration has reflected, shaped, and transformed these practices in both their place of origin and immigration.

About the Author

LAURA HALPERIN is an assistant professor of English and comparative literature and Latina/o studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 
 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. The Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs

2. Building Community and Connections in Los Angeles

3. Community Life across Borders

4. Yalandaacute;lag Zapotec Identities in a Changing World

5. Identities of the Second-Generation Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs

6. Danzas Chuscas: Performing Status, Violence, and Gender in Oaxacalifornia

7. Community and Culture in Transnational Perspective

Conclusion

Appendix

Notes

Glossary

References

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813560717
Author:
Cruz-manjarrez, Adriana
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Guevarra, Jr., Rudy P.
Author:
Cruz-Manjarrez, Adriana
Author:
Rudy P. Guevarra, Jr.
Author:
Halperin, Laura
Author:
Plascencia, Luis F. B.
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Mythology-Folklore and Storytelling
Subject:
multicultural identify
Subject:
Comparative mixed race studies Latino Filipino
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
5 tables
Pages:
266
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Dance » World and Ethnic
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
Humanities » Mythology » Folklore and Storytelling

Zapotecs on the Move: Cultural, Social, and Political Processes in Transnational Prespective (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$103.75 In Stock
Product details 266 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813560717 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalaltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez examines the impact of international migration on this community, tracing five decades of migration to Los Angeles to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the U.S.

"Synopsis" by ,
In this innovative new study, Laura Halperin examines literary representations of harm inflicted on Latinas’ minds and bodies, and on the places Latinas inhabit, but she also explores how hope can be found amid so much harm. Analyzing contemporary memoirs and novels by Irene Vilar, Loida Maritza Pérez, Ana Castillo, Cristina García, and Julia Alvarez, she argues that the individual harm experienced by Latinas needs to be understood in relation to the collective histories of aggression against their communities. 
 
"Synopsis" by ,
Central to contemporary debates in the United States on migration and migrant policy is the idea of citizenship, andandmdash;as apparent in the continued debate over Arizonaandrsquo;s immigration law SB 1070andmdash;this issue remains a focal point of contention, with a key concern being whether there should be a path to citizenship for andldquo;undocumentedandrdquo; migrants. In Disenchanting Citizenship, Luis F. B. Plascencia examines two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrantsandrsquo; position in the United States. and#160;

The book explores the meaning of U.S. citizenship through the experience of a unique group of Mexican migrants who were granted Temporary Status under the andldquo;legalizationandrdquo; provisions of the 1986 IRCA, attained Lawful Permanent Residency, and later became U.S. citizens. Plascencia integrates an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis in examining efforts that promote the acquisition of citizenship, the teaching of citizenship classes, and naturalization ceremonies. Ultimately, he unearths citizenshipandrsquo;s root as a Janus-faced construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to the migrant experience, arguing that the acquisition of citizenship can lead to disenchantment with the very status desired. In the end, Plascencia expands our understanding of the dynamics of U.S. citizenship as a form of membership and belonging.

"Synopsis" by ,
Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalandaacute;ltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, this book examines the impact of international migration on this community. It traces five decades of migration to Los Angeles in order to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the United States, exploring why these immigrants and their descendents now think of themselves as Mexican, Mexican Indian immigrants, Oaxaqueandntilde;os, and Latinosandmdash;identities they did not claim in Mexico.

Based on multi-site fieldwork conducted over a five-year period, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez analyzes how and why Yalandaacute;lag Zapotec identity and culture have been reconfigured in the United States, using such cultural practices as music, dance, and religious rituals as a lens to bring this dynamic process into focus. By illustrating the sociocultural, economic, and political practices that link immigrants in Los Angeles to those left behind, the book documents how transnational migration has reflected, shaped, and transformed these practices in both their place of origin and immigration.

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