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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Critical Issues in Health and Medicine series:

Comrades in Health: U.S. Health Internationalists, Abroad and at Home (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine)

by

Comrades in Health: U.S. Health Internationalists, Abroad and at Home (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The most dramatic growth of Christianity in the late twentieth century has occurred in Africa, where Catholic missions have played major roles. But these missions did more than simply convert Africans. Catholic sisters became heavily involved in the Churchandrsquo;s health services and eventually in relief and social justice efforts. Inand#160;Into Africa, Barbra Mann Wall offers a transnational history that reveals how Catholic medical and nursing sisters established relationships between local and international groups, sparking an exchange of ideas that crossed national, religious, gender, and political boundaries.

and#160;

Both a nurse and a historian, Wall explores this intersection of religion, medicine, gender, race, and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, focusing on the years following World War II, a period when European colonial rule was ending and Africans were building new governments, health care institutions, and education systems. She focuses specifically on hospitals, clinics, and schools of nursing in Ghana and Uganda run by the Medical Mission Sisters of Philadelphia; in Nigeria and Uganda by the Irish Medical Missionaries of Mary; in Tanzania by the Maryknoll Sisters of New York; and in Nigeria by a local Nigerian congregation. Wall shows how, although initially somewhat ethnocentric, the sisters gradually developed a deeper understanding of the diverse populations they served. In the process, their medical and nursing work intersected with critical social, political, and cultural debates that continue in Africa today: debates about the role of women in their local societies, the relationship of women to the nursing and medical professions and to the Catholic Church, the obligations countries have to provide care for their citizens, and the role of women in human rights.

and#160;

A groundbreaking contribution to the study of globalization and medicine, Into Africa highlights the importance of transnational partnerships, using the stories of these nuns to enhance the understanding of medical mission work and global change.

Synopsis:

The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina has placed a national spotlight on the shameful state of healthcare for America's poor. In the face of this highly publicized disaster, public health experts are more concerned than ever about persistent disparities that result from income and race.

This book tells the story of one groundbreaking approach to medicine that attacks the problem by focusing on the wellness of whole neighborhoods. Since their creation during the 1960s, community health centers have served the needs of the poor in the tenements of New York, the colonias of Texas, the working class neighborhoods of Boston, and the dirt farms of the South. As products of the civil rights movement, the early centers provided not only primary and preventive care, but also social and environmental services, economic development, and empowerment.

Bonnie Lefkowitz-herself a veteran of community health administration-explores the program's unlikely transformation from a small and beleaguered demonstration effort to a network of close to a thousand modern health care organizations serving nearly 15 million people. In a series of personal accounts and interviews with national leaders and dozens of health care workers, patients, and activists in five communities across the United States, she shows how health centers have endured despite cynicism and inertia, the vagaries of politics, and ongoing discrimination.

 

Synopsis:

Inand#160;Into Africa, Barbra Mann Wall offers a transnational history that explores the intersection of religion, medicine, gender, race, and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, focusing on the years following World War II. The book highlights the importance of transnational partnerships, using the stories of four groups of European and American nuns to enhance our understanding of medical mission work and global change.

Synopsis:

Since the early twentieth century, politically engaged and socially committed U.S. health professionals have worked in solidarity with progressive movements around the world. Often with roots in social medicine, political activism, and international socialism, these doctors, nurses, and other health workers became comrades who joined forces with people struggling for social justice, equity, and the right to health.

Anne-Emanuelle birn and Theodore M. Brown bring together a group of professionals and activists whose lives have been dedicated to health internationalism. By presenting a combination of historical accounts and first-hand reflections, this collection of essays aims to draw attention to the longstanading international activities of the American health left and the lessons they brought home. The involvement of these progressive U.S. health professionals is presented against the background of foreign and domestic policy, social mvoements, and global politics.

Synopsis:

Since the early twentieth century, politically engaged and socially committed U.S. health professionals have worked in solidarity with progressive movements around the world. Often with roots in social medicine, political activism, and international socialism, these doctors, nurses, and other health workers became comrades who joined forces with people struggling for social justice, equity, and the right to health.

Anne-Emanuelle Birn and Theodore M. Brown bring together a group of professionals and activists whose lives have been dedicated to health internationalism. By presenting a combination of historical accounts and first-hand reflections, this collection of essays aims to draw attention to the longstanding international activities of the American health left and the lessons they brought home. The involvement of these progressive U.S. health professionals is presented against the background of foreign and domestic policy, social movements, and global politics.

About the Author

Bonnie Lefkowitz is a health policy writer and consultant with twenty-four years of experience as a federal researcher, administrator, and policy analyst. She lives in North Beach, Maryland.

Table of Contents

List of Figures

Foreword

Acknowledgments

Part I

1. Introduction: Health Comrades, Abroad and at Home

2. The Making of Health Internationalists

Part II

3. The Perils of Unconstrained Enthusiasm

4. American Medical Support for Spanish Democracy, 1936andndash;1938

5. Medical McCarthyism and the Punishment of Internationalist Physicians in the United States

Part III

6. Contesting Racism and Innovating Community Health Centers

7. Barefoot in China, the Bronx, and Beyond

8. Medical Internationalism and the andldquo;Last Epidemicandrdquo;

Part IV

9. Social Medicine, at Home and Abroad

10. Find the Best People and Support Them

11. Cooperantes, Solidarity, and the Fight for Health in Mozambique

12. From Harlem to Harare

Part V

13. Brigadistas and Revolutionaries

14. Health and Human Rights in Latin America, and Beyond

15. History, Theory, and Praxis in Pacific Islands Health

16. Doctors for Global Health

17. Doctors Across Blockades

Part VI

18. Across the Generations

Notes on Contributors

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813561219
Author:
Birn, Anne-emanuelle (edt)
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Birn, Anne-Emanuelle
Author:
Remen, Razel
Author:
Wall, Barbra Mann
Author:
Waitzkin, Howard
Author:
Terry, Michael
Author:
Lown, Bernard
Author:
Sidel, Ruth
Author:
Yamin, Alicia Ely
Author:
Brickman, Jane Pacht
Author:
Pfeiffer, James
Author:
Geiger, H.
Author:
Holtz, Timothy
Author:
Geiger, H. Jack
Author:
Solomon, Susan
Author:
Yamin, Alicia
Author:
Navarro, Vicente
Author:
Sidel, Victor W.
Author:
Bassett, Mary
Author:
Johnson, Wendy
Author:
Bondi-Boyd, Brea
Author:
Gloyd, Stephen
Author:
Bassett, Mary Travis
Author:
Yamada, Seiji
Author:
Brown, Theodore M.
Author:
Turiano, Laura
Author:
Lefkowitz, Bonnie
Author:
Smith, Lanny
Author:
Lear, Walter J.
Author:
Braveman, Paula
Author:
Kasper, Jennifer
Author:
Solomon, Susan Gross
Author:
Sidel, Victor
Subject:
Health Care Delivery
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Subject:
Public Policy
Subject:
History
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Critical Issues in Health and Medicine
Publication Date:
20130731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
12 photographs, 6 tables
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

» Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
» Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties

Comrades in Health: U.S. Health Internationalists, Abroad and at Home (Critical Issues in Health and Medicine) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$98.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813561219 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The aftermath of Hurricane Katrina has placed a national spotlight on the shameful state of healthcare for America's poor. In the face of this highly publicized disaster, public health experts are more concerned than ever about persistent disparities that result from income and race.

This book tells the story of one groundbreaking approach to medicine that attacks the problem by focusing on the wellness of whole neighborhoods. Since their creation during the 1960s, community health centers have served the needs of the poor in the tenements of New York, the colonias of Texas, the working class neighborhoods of Boston, and the dirt farms of the South. As products of the civil rights movement, the early centers provided not only primary and preventive care, but also social and environmental services, economic development, and empowerment.

Bonnie Lefkowitz-herself a veteran of community health administration-explores the program's unlikely transformation from a small and beleaguered demonstration effort to a network of close to a thousand modern health care organizations serving nearly 15 million people. In a series of personal accounts and interviews with national leaders and dozens of health care workers, patients, and activists in five communities across the United States, she shows how health centers have endured despite cynicism and inertia, the vagaries of politics, and ongoing discrimination.

 

"Synopsis" by ,
Inand#160;Into Africa, Barbra Mann Wall offers a transnational history that explores the intersection of religion, medicine, gender, race, and politics in sub-Saharan Africa, focusing on the years following World War II. The book highlights the importance of transnational partnerships, using the stories of four groups of European and American nuns to enhance our understanding of medical mission work and global change.

"Synopsis" by ,
Since the early twentieth century, politically engaged and socially committed U.S. health professionals have worked in solidarity with progressive movements around the world. Often with roots in social medicine, political activism, and international socialism, these doctors, nurses, and other health workers became comrades who joined forces with people struggling for social justice, equity, and the right to health.

Anne-Emanuelle birn and Theodore M. Brown bring together a group of professionals and activists whose lives have been dedicated to health internationalism. By presenting a combination of historical accounts and first-hand reflections, this collection of essays aims to draw attention to the longstanading international activities of the American health left and the lessons they brought home. The involvement of these progressive U.S. health professionals is presented against the background of foreign and domestic policy, social mvoements, and global politics.

"Synopsis" by ,
Since the early twentieth century, politically engaged and socially committed U.S. health professionals have worked in solidarity with progressive movements around the world. Often with roots in social medicine, political activism, and international socialism, these doctors, nurses, and other health workers became comrades who joined forces with people struggling for social justice, equity, and the right to health.

Anne-Emanuelle Birn and Theodore M. Brown bring together a group of professionals and activists whose lives have been dedicated to health internationalism. By presenting a combination of historical accounts and first-hand reflections, this collection of essays aims to draw attention to the longstanding international activities of the American health left and the lessons they brought home. The involvement of these progressive U.S. health professionals is presented against the background of foreign and domestic policy, social movements, and global politics.

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