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The Land Without Shadows (CARAF Books)

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The Land Without Shadows (CARAF Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of the first literary works to portray Djiboutians from their own point of view, The Land without Shadows is a collection of seventeen short stories. The author, Abdourahman A. Waberi, one of a handful of francophone writers of fiction to have emerged in the twentieth century from the confetti-sized state of Djibouti, has already won international recognition and prizes in African literature for his stories and novel. Because his writing is linked to immigration and exile, his native Djibouti occupies center stage in his work. Drawing on the Somali/Djiboutian oral tradition to weave pieces of legend, proverbs, music, poetry, and history together with references to writers as diverse as Soyinka, Shakespeare, Djebar, Baudelaire, Cesaire, Waugh, Senghor, and Beckett, Waberi succeeds in bringing his country into a context that reaches well beyond the Horn of Africa.

Originally published in France in 1994 as Le Pays sans ombre, this newly translated collection presents stories about the precolonial and colonial past of Djibouti alongside those set in the postcolonial era. With irony and humor, these short stories portray madmen, poets, artists, French colonists, pseudointellectuals, young women, aspiring politicians, famished refugees, khat chewers, nomads struggling to survive in Djibouti's ruthless natural environment, or tramps living (and dying) in Balbala, the shantytown that stretches to the south of the capital. Waberi's complex web of allusions locates his tales at an intersection between history and ethnography, politics and literature. While written in a narrative prose, these stories nevertheless call on an indigenous literary tradition that elevates poetry to the highest standing.

By juxtaposing the present with the past, the individual with the collective, the colonized with the colonizer, the local with the global, The Land without Shadows composes an image of Djibouti that is at times both kaleidoscopic and cinematographic. Here the art of the short story offers partial but brilliantly illuminated scenes of the Djiboutian urban and rural landscape, its people, and its history.

For sale in the U.S. and its territories only

Synopsis:

In this first collection of poetry by critically acclaimed writer Abdourahman A. Waberi, we the readers can drink in Djiboutis compelling landscape—‘desert furrows of fire, ‘mute foliage of cactus, ‘yellow chameleon sky—to better understand this tiny country strategically located in the Horn of Africa. Waberis poems take us to spaces where nomadic words live—in exile, in the muezzins call, in a place where morning dew is ‘sucked up by the eye of the sun—black often, pink from time to time.

Waberis voice is intelligent as well as ironic, and always appealing. He strongly condemns the civil wars that have plagued the East African region. His is a message of tolerance, and we find in this compact volume, living side by side, a rosary for the treasures of Timbuktu, destroyed by Islamic extremists, and a poem dedicated to Edmond Jabès, the Jewish writer and poet born in Cairo.

Synopsis:

Few of us have had the opportunity to visit Djibouti, the small crook of a country strategically located in the Horn of Africa, which makes The Nomads, My Brothers, Go Out to Drink from the Big Dipper all the more seductive. In his first collection of poetry, the critically acclaimed writer Abdourahman A. Waberi writes passionately about his countrys landscape, drawing for us pictures of “desert furrows of fire” and a “yellow chameleon sky.” Waberis poems take us to unexpected spaces—in exile, in the muezzins call, and where morning dew is “sucked up by the eye of the sun—black often, pink from time to time.”

            Translated by Nancy Naomi Carlson, Waberis voice is intelligent, at times ironic, and always appealing. His poems strongly condemn the civil wars that have plagued East Africa and advocate tolerance and peace. In this compact volume, such ideas live side by side as a rosary for the treasures of Timbuktu, destroyed by Islamic extremists, and a poem dedicated to Edmond Jabès, the Jewish writer and poet born in Cairo.

 

 “With Waberi, the juxtapositions—surprising, provocative, and original—form a good part of the thrill themselves.”—Words Without Borders

About the Author

Abdourahman A. Waberi is a novelist, essayist, poet, and professor of literature at George Washington University. He is the author of The Land without Shadows, In the United States of Africa, and Passage of Tears, the last also published by Seagull Books.
Nancy Naomi Carlson is an award-winning author and translator.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813925080
Translator:
Garane, Jeanne
Foreword:
Farah, Nuruddin
Translator:
Garane, Jeanne
Foreword by:
Farah, Nuruddin
Foreword:
Farah, Nuruddin
Author:
Carlson, Nancy Naomi
Author:
Waberi, Abdourahman A.
Publisher:
University of Virginia Press
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
General Poetry
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Seagull Books - The Africa List
Publication Date:
20051131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
96
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5 in

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Land Without Shadows (CARAF Books) New Trade Paper
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Product details 96 pages University Press of Virginia - English 9780813925080 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In this first collection of poetry by critically acclaimed writer Abdourahman A. Waberi, we the readers can drink in Djiboutis compelling landscape—‘desert furrows of fire, ‘mute foliage of cactus, ‘yellow chameleon sky—to better understand this tiny country strategically located in the Horn of Africa. Waberis poems take us to spaces where nomadic words live—in exile, in the muezzins call, in a place where morning dew is ‘sucked up by the eye of the sun—black often, pink from time to time.

Waberis voice is intelligent as well as ironic, and always appealing. He strongly condemns the civil wars that have plagued the East African region. His is a message of tolerance, and we find in this compact volume, living side by side, a rosary for the treasures of Timbuktu, destroyed by Islamic extremists, and a poem dedicated to Edmond Jabès, the Jewish writer and poet born in Cairo.

"Synopsis" by ,
Few of us have had the opportunity to visit Djibouti, the small crook of a country strategically located in the Horn of Africa, which makes The Nomads, My Brothers, Go Out to Drink from the Big Dipper all the more seductive. In his first collection of poetry, the critically acclaimed writer Abdourahman A. Waberi writes passionately about his countrys landscape, drawing for us pictures of “desert furrows of fire” and a “yellow chameleon sky.” Waberis poems take us to unexpected spaces—in exile, in the muezzins call, and where morning dew is “sucked up by the eye of the sun—black often, pink from time to time.”

            Translated by Nancy Naomi Carlson, Waberis voice is intelligent, at times ironic, and always appealing. His poems strongly condemn the civil wars that have plagued East Africa and advocate tolerance and peace. In this compact volume, such ideas live side by side as a rosary for the treasures of Timbuktu, destroyed by Islamic extremists, and a poem dedicated to Edmond Jabès, the Jewish writer and poet born in Cairo.

 

 “With Waberi, the juxtapositions—surprising, provocative, and original—form a good part of the thrill themselves.”—Words Without Borders

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