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Murdering Masculinities: Fantasies of Gender and Violence in the American Crime Novel (Sexual Cultures)

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Murdering Masculinities: Fantasies of Gender and Violence in the American Crime Novel (Sexual Cultures) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Get ready for takeoff. The life of the flight attendant, a.k.a., stewardess, was supposedly once one of glamour, exotic travel and sexual freedom, as recently depicted in such films as Catch Me If You Can and View From the Top. The nostalgia for the beautiful, carefree and ever helpful stewardess perhaps reveals a yearning for simpler times, but nonetheless does not square with the difficult, demanding and sometimes dangerous job of today's flight attendants. Based on interviews with over sixty flight attendants, both female and male labor leaders, and and drawing upon his observations while flying across the country and overseas, Drew Whitelegg reveals a much more complicated profession, one that in many ways is the quintessential job of the modern age where life moves at record speeds and all that is solid seems up in the air.

Containing lively portraits of flight attendants, both current and retired, this book is the first to show the intimate, illuminating, funny, and sometimes dangerous behind-the-scenes stories of daily life for the flight attendant. Going behind the curtain, Whitelegg ventures into first-class, coach, the cabin, and life on call for these men and women who spend week in and week out in foreign cities, sleeping in hotel rooms miles from home. Working the Skies also elucidates the contemporary work and labor issues that confront the modern worker: the demands of full-time work and parenthood; the downsizing of corporate America and the resulting labor lockouts; decreasing wages and hours worked; job insecurity; and the emotional toll of a high stress job. Given the events of 9/11, flight attendants now have an especially poignant set of stressful concerns to manage, both for their own safety as well as for those they serve, the passengers. Flight attendants, originally registered nurses charged with attending to passengers' medical needs, now find themselves wearing the hats of therapist, security guard and undercover agent. This last set of tasks pushing some, as Whitelegg shows, out of the business altogether.

Synopsis:

"Sumptuous, elegant, nuanced, and accessible, Greg Forter helps us to remember what language can do. But Forter minces more than words in Murdering Masculinities. He offers a transformative reading of American crime fiction, arguing that it is not to high modernism that we should look for the reinvention of gender, but rather to authors like James Cain, Chester Himes, Dashiell Hammett, Jim Thompson, and in particular William Faulkner."

--Kaja Silverman

Though American crime novels are often derided for containing misogynistic attitudes and limiting ideas of masculinity, Greg Forter maintains that they are instead psychologically complex and sophisticated works that demand closer attention. Eschewing the synthetic methodologies of earlier work on crime fiction, Murdering Masculinities argues that the crime novel does not provide a consolidated and stable notion of masculinity. Rather, it demands that male readers take responsibility for the desires they project on to these novels.

Forter examines the narrative strategies of five novels--Hammett's The Glass Key, Cain's Serenade, Faulkner's Sanctuary, Thompson's Pop. 1280, and Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol--in conjunction with their treatment of bodily metaphors of smell, vision, and voice. In the process, Forter unearths a "generic unconscious" that reveals things Freud both discovered and sought to repress.

Synopsis:

Though American crime novels are often derided for containing misogynistic attitudes and limiting ideas of masculinity, Greg Forter maintains that they are instead psychologically complex and sophisticated works that demand closer attention. Eschewing the synthetic methodologies of earlier work on crime fiction, Murdering Masculinities argues that the crime novel does not provide a consolidated and stable notion of masculinity. Rather, it demands that male readers take responsibility for the desires they project on to these novels.

Forter examines the narrative strategies of five novels--Hammett's The Glass Key, Cain's Serenade, Faulkner's Sanctuary, Thompson's Pop. 1280, and Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol--in conjunction with their treatment of bodily metaphors of smell, vision, and voice. In the process, Forter unearths a "generic unconscious" that reveals things Freud both discovered and sought to repress.

About the Author

Greg Forter teaches American Literature at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814726914
Author:
Forter, Greg
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Forter, Greg
Author:
Whitelegg, Drew
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
History and criticism
Subject:
Mystery & Detective Fiction
Subject:
Men's Studies - Masculinity
Subject:
American fiction
Subject:
Crime in literature
Subject:
Psychoanalysis and literature
Subject:
Men in literature
Subject:
Detective and mystery stories, American
Subject:
Violence in literature
Subject:
Fantasy in literature
Subject:
Masculinity in literature.
Subject:
Criminals in literature.
Subject:
General Literary Criticism & Collections
Subject:
AMERICAN FICTION_HISTORY AND CRITICISM_20TH CENTURY
Subject:
FICTION_MYSTERY and DETECTIVE_GENERAL
Subject:
NOVELS, OTHER PROSE AND WRITERS: FROM c1900 -_USA_AMERICAN ENGLISH
Subject:
Men
Subject:
S STUDIES_USA_AMERICAN ENGLISH
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Sexual Cultures Ser.
Series Volume:
104-677
Publication Date:
20001131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
278
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Mens Studies
History and Social Science » Military » General History
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Murdering Masculinities: Fantasies of Gender and Violence in the American Crime Novel (Sexual Cultures) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 278 pages New York University Press - English 9780814726914 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Sumptuous, elegant, nuanced, and accessible, Greg Forter helps us to remember what language can do. But Forter minces more than words in Murdering Masculinities. He offers a transformative reading of American crime fiction, arguing that it is not to high modernism that we should look for the reinvention of gender, but rather to authors like James Cain, Chester Himes, Dashiell Hammett, Jim Thompson, and in particular William Faulkner."

--Kaja Silverman

Though American crime novels are often derided for containing misogynistic attitudes and limiting ideas of masculinity, Greg Forter maintains that they are instead psychologically complex and sophisticated works that demand closer attention. Eschewing the synthetic methodologies of earlier work on crime fiction, Murdering Masculinities argues that the crime novel does not provide a consolidated and stable notion of masculinity. Rather, it demands that male readers take responsibility for the desires they project on to these novels.

Forter examines the narrative strategies of five novels--Hammett's The Glass Key, Cain's Serenade, Faulkner's Sanctuary, Thompson's Pop. 1280, and Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol--in conjunction with their treatment of bodily metaphors of smell, vision, and voice. In the process, Forter unearths a "generic unconscious" that reveals things Freud both discovered and sought to repress.

"Synopsis" by , Though American crime novels are often derided for containing misogynistic attitudes and limiting ideas of masculinity, Greg Forter maintains that they are instead psychologically complex and sophisticated works that demand closer attention. Eschewing the synthetic methodologies of earlier work on crime fiction, Murdering Masculinities argues that the crime novel does not provide a consolidated and stable notion of masculinity. Rather, it demands that male readers take responsibility for the desires they project on to these novels.

Forter examines the narrative strategies of five novels--Hammett's The Glass Key, Cain's Serenade, Faulkner's Sanctuary, Thompson's Pop. 1280, and Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol--in conjunction with their treatment of bodily metaphors of smell, vision, and voice. In the process, Forter unearths a "generic unconscious" that reveals things Freud both discovered and sought to repress.

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