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The Games Black Girls Play: Learning the Ropes from Double Dutch to Hip-Hop

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The Games Black Girls Play: Learning the Ropes from Double Dutch to Hip-Hop Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"The Games Black Girls Play is most readable for the compelling connections between these games, passed down as an African-American tradition through a kind of intuitive education....Gaunt successfully lifts ignored girls from obscurity to center stage....With Games, Gaunt has created a necessary space for translating black girls' joy in a society that typically overlooks it. Hopefully, others will take their turn and jump in to keep the games going." Joshunda Sanders, Bitch magazine (read the entire Bitch magazine review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When we think of African American popular music, our first thought is probably not of double-dutch: girls bouncing between two twirling ropes, keeping time to the tick-tat under their toes. But this book argues that the games black girls play — handclapping songs, cheers, and double-dutch jump rope — both reflect and inspire the principles of black popular musicmaking.

The Games Black Girls Play illustrates how black musical styles are incorporated into the earliest games African American girls learn — how, in effect, these games contain the DNA of black music. Drawing on interviews, recordings of handclapping games and cheers, and her own observation and memories of gameplaying, Kyra D. Gaunt argues that black girls' games are connected to long traditions of African and African American musicmaking, and that they teach vital musical and social lessons that are carried into adulthood. In this celebration of playground poetry and childhood choreography, she uncovers the surprisingly rich contributions of girls' play to black popular culture.

Review:

"By placing black girls at the center of her analysis, Kyra Gaunt challenges us to be ever mindful of the importance of gender, the body, and the everyday in our discussions of black music. The Games Black Girls Play is an exciting and original work that should forever transform the way we think about the sources of black, indeed American, populat music. This is a bold, brilliant, and beautifully written book."- Farah Jasmine Griffin, Columbia University

Review:

"The Games Black Girls Play not only makes the point that black girls matter, but that the games, thoughts, and passions of black girls matter in a world that regularly renders black girls invisible and silent. Gaunt brilliantly argues that the culture of black girls is a critical influence on contemporary black popular culture." Mark Anthony Neal, author of New Black Man: Rethinking Black Masculinity

Review:

"[A] smart, delightful and witty polemic of attributions; a cultural benchmark of the complex web of history, race and gender...linking the 'intergenerational cultures of black musical expression' as embodied in the infectious playfulness of black girls." Black Issues Book Review

Synopsis:

2007 Alan Merriam Prize presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology

2007 PEN/Beyond Margins Book Award Finalist

When we think of African American popular music, our first thought is probably not of double-dutch: girls bouncing between two twirling ropes, keeping time to the tick-tat under their toes. But this book argues that the games black girls play —handclapping songs, cheers, and double-dutch jump rope—both reflect and inspire the principles of black popular musicmaking.

The Games Black Girls Play illustrates how black musical styles are incorporated into the earliest games African American girls learn—how, in effect, these games contain the DNA of black music. Drawing on interviews, recordings of handclapping games and cheers, and her own observation and memories of gameplaying, Kyra D. Gaunt argues that black girls' games are connected to long traditions of African and African American musicmaking, and that they teach vital musical and social lessons that are carried into adulthood. In this celebration of playground poetry and childhood choreography, she uncovers the surprisingly rich contributions of girls play to black popular culture.

Synopsis:

Why Asia?: Contemporary Asian and Asian American Art is a ground-breaking investigation into two overlapping and rapidly emerging areas in contemporary art. Extricating them from their current confusion under a generic "Asian" label, Yang reveals the specificity of each. The book consists of lucid discussions on individual artists, exhibitions and theoretical issues. With over sixty illustrations it serves to introduce the current landscape of Asian and Asian American Art, with essays on art in China, Taiwan and North America, as well as individual essays on leading artists such as Rirkrit Tiravanija, Xu Bing and Michael Joo. Above all, Yang explores the challenges that contemporary Asian and Asian American art poses to artists, critics, curators and viewers alike. In particular, she reflects on the complexities of exhibition practice, the role of identity politics in arts, the unspoken assumptions of Western critics faced with Asian art, and the difficulties faced by artists working between cultures. This is a major critical contribution in an area where criticism conspicuously lags behind artistic practice.

About the Author

Kyra D. Gaunt is associate professor of ethnomusicology at New York University who lectures nationally and internationally on African American music. She is also a jazz vocalist, songwriter and recording artist.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814731208
Subtitle:
Learning the Ropes from Double-Dutch to Hip-Hop
Publisher:
NYU Press
Author:
Gaunt, Kyra D.
Author:
Yang, Alice
Author:
Gaunt, Kyra
Author:
Hay, Jonathan
Author:
Young, Mimi
Subject:
General
Subject:
Ethnomusicology
Subject:
Music
Subject:
Rap (music)
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Rap (Music) -- History and criticism.
Subject:
African Americans - Music -
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
February 2006
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
238
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Ethnomusicology
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family

The Games Black Girls Play: Learning the Ropes from Double Dutch to Hip-Hop
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 238 pages New York University Press - English 9780814731208 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "The Games Black Girls Play is most readable for the compelling connections between these games, passed down as an African-American tradition through a kind of intuitive education....Gaunt successfully lifts ignored girls from obscurity to center stage....With Games, Gaunt has created a necessary space for translating black girls' joy in a society that typically overlooks it. Hopefully, others will take their turn and jump in to keep the games going." (read the entire Bitch magazine review)
"Review" by , "By placing black girls at the center of her analysis, Kyra Gaunt challenges us to be ever mindful of the importance of gender, the body, and the everyday in our discussions of black music. The Games Black Girls Play is an exciting and original work that should forever transform the way we think about the sources of black, indeed American, populat music. This is a bold, brilliant, and beautifully written book."-
"Review" by , "The Games Black Girls Play not only makes the point that black girls matter, but that the games, thoughts, and passions of black girls matter in a world that regularly renders black girls invisible and silent. Gaunt brilliantly argues that the culture of black girls is a critical influence on contemporary black popular culture."
"Review" by , "[A] smart, delightful and witty polemic of attributions; a cultural benchmark of the complex web of history, race and gender...linking the 'intergenerational cultures of black musical expression' as embodied in the infectious playfulness of black girls."
"Synopsis" by , 2007 Alan Merriam Prize presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology

2007 PEN/Beyond Margins Book Award Finalist

When we think of African American popular music, our first thought is probably not of double-dutch: girls bouncing between two twirling ropes, keeping time to the tick-tat under their toes. But this book argues that the games black girls play —handclapping songs, cheers, and double-dutch jump rope—both reflect and inspire the principles of black popular musicmaking.

The Games Black Girls Play illustrates how black musical styles are incorporated into the earliest games African American girls learn—how, in effect, these games contain the DNA of black music. Drawing on interviews, recordings of handclapping games and cheers, and her own observation and memories of gameplaying, Kyra D. Gaunt argues that black girls' games are connected to long traditions of African and African American musicmaking, and that they teach vital musical and social lessons that are carried into adulthood. In this celebration of playground poetry and childhood choreography, she uncovers the surprisingly rich contributions of girls play to black popular culture.

"Synopsis" by , Why Asia?: Contemporary Asian and Asian American Art is a ground-breaking investigation into two overlapping and rapidly emerging areas in contemporary art. Extricating them from their current confusion under a generic "Asian" label, Yang reveals the specificity of each. The book consists of lucid discussions on individual artists, exhibitions and theoretical issues. With over sixty illustrations it serves to introduce the current landscape of Asian and Asian American Art, with essays on art in China, Taiwan and North America, as well as individual essays on leading artists such as Rirkrit Tiravanija, Xu Bing and Michael Joo. Above all, Yang explores the challenges that contemporary Asian and Asian American art poses to artists, critics, curators and viewers alike. In particular, she reflects on the complexities of exhibition practice, the role of identity politics in arts, the unspoken assumptions of Western critics faced with Asian art, and the difficulties faced by artists working between cultures. This is a major critical contribution in an area where criticism conspicuously lags behind artistic practice.
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