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This title in other editions

The New Disability History: American Perspectives (History of Disability)

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The New Disability History: American Perspectives (History of Disability) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

View the #LINK<Table of Contents>#   Read the #LINK<Introduction>#.

"Historians of medicine and technology will find this book an interesting introduction to a highly politicized and novel area of scholarship. This work should inspire research projects into more diverse and less categorized areas of disability."

TechnologyandCulture

"With this work, Longmore and Umansky offer historians, sociologists and other readers intrigued by this area of scholarship an opportunity to understand disabilities as broader and more complex than a single, generic and primarily medical category."

Publishers Weekly

"The essays introduce into the historical record a diverse group of people whose views and experiences have been largely excluded, challenge conventional notions of bodily integrity, and represent an important new subfield in American history from which we can expect rich and exciting innovation."

The Historian

"The fifteen essays contained in it are thorough, wide-ranging and convincing in their interpretations. . . . This is a powerful contribution to the emancipatory efforts of disabled activists and one that historians should seek to encourage. For this, Longmore and Umansky's collection should be strongly commended."

Journal of American Studies

"The New Disability History: American Perspectives is a truly groundbreaking volume and is well-deserving of the praise heaped on its back cover."

H-Net Reviews

The essays show us that disability has a place in various parts of our history. While there is an enormous diversity of disability, the collection of essays reminds us of how comparable social perils recur across various disability groups and throughout their particular histories."

Metapsychology

Disability has always been a preoccupation of American society and culture. From antebellum debates about qualification for citizenship to current controversies over access and reasonable accommodations, disability has been present, in penumbra if not in print, on virtually every page of American history. Yet historians have only recently begun the deep excavation necessary to retrieve lives shrouded in religious, then medical, and always deep-seated cultural, misunderstanding.

This volume opens up disability's hidden history. In these pages, a North Carolina Youth finds his identity as a deaf Southerner challenged in Civil War-era New York. Deaf community leaders ardently defend sign language in early 20th century America. The mythic Helen Keller and the long-forgotten American Blind People's higher Education and General Improvement Association each struggle to shape public and private roles for blind Americans. White and black disabled World War I and II veterans contest public policies and cultural values to claim their citizenship rights. Neurasthenic Alice James and injured turn-of-the-century railroadmen grapple with the interplay of disability and gender. Progressive-era rehabilitationists fashion programs to make crippled children economically productive and socially valid, and two Depression-era fathers murder their sons as public opinion blames the boys' mothers for having cherished the lads' lives. These and many other figures lead readers through hospital-schools, courtrooms, advocacy journals, and beyond to discover disability's past.

Coupling empirical evidence with the interdisciplinary tools and insights of disability studies, the book explores the complex meanings of disability as identity and cultural signifier in American history.

Table of ContentsIntroduction: Disability History: From the Margins to the Mainstream

Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky

Part I: Uses and Contests

1 Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History

Douglas C. Baynton

2 "Speech Has an Extraordinary Humanizing Power":Horace Mann and the Problem of Nineteenth-Century American Deaf Education

R. A. R. Edwards

3 "This Unnatural and Fratricidal Strife": A Family'sNegotiation of the Civil War, Deafness, and Independence

Hannah Joyner

4 "Trying to Idle": Work and Disability in The Diary of Alice James

Natalie A. Dykstra

Part II: Redefinitions and Resistance

5 A Pupil and a Patient: Hospital-Schools in Progressive America

Brad Byrom

6 Cold Charity: Manhood, Brotherhood, and the Transformation of Disability, 1870-1900

John Williams-Searle

7 The Outlook of The Problem and the Problem with the Outlook: Two Advocacy Journals Reinvent Blind People in Turn-of-the-Century America

Catherine J. Kudlick

8 Reading between the Signs: Defending Deaf Culture in Early Twentieth-Century America

Susan Burch

9 Medicine, Bureaucracy, and Social Welfare: The Politics of Disability Compensation for American Veterans of World War I

K. Walter Hickel

10 Helen Keller and the Politics of Civic Fitness

Kim Nielsen

Part III: Images and Identities

11 Martyred Mothers and Merciful Fathers: Exploring Disability and Motherhood in the Lives of Jerome Greenfield and Raymond Repouille

Janice A. Brockley

12 Blind and Enlightened: The Contested Origins of the Egalitarian Politics of the Blinded Veterans Association

David A. Gerber

13 Seeing the Disabled: Visual Rhetorics of Disability in Popular Photography

Rosemarie Garland Thomson

14 American Disability Policy in the Twentieth Century

Richard K. Scotch

Contributors

Index

Synopsis:

Toward the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found. It lay in biological solutions, focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or improved through drugs. We entered the "Prozac Age" and believed we had moved far beyond the time of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare. Biological psychiatry had triumphed.

Except maybe it hadn't. Starting with surprising evidence from the World Health Organization that suggests that people recover better from mental illness in a developing country than in the first world, Doctoring the Mind asks the question: how good are our mental healthcare services, really? Richard P. Bentall picks apart the science that underlies our current psychiatric practice. He puts the patient back at the heart of treatment for mental illness, making the case that a good relationship between patients and their doctors is the most important indicator of whether someone will recover.

Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty-first century.

Synopsis:

Disability has always been a preoccupation of American society and culture. From antebellum debates about qualification for citizenship to current controversies over access and reasonable accommodations, disability has been present, in penumbra if not in print, on virtually every page of American history. Yet historians have only recently begun the deep excavation necessary to retrieve lives shrouded in religious, then medical, and always deep-seated cultural, misunderstanding.

This volume opens up disability's hidden history. In these pages, a North Carolina Youth finds his identity as a deaf Southerner challenged in Civil War-era New York. Deaf community leaders ardently defend sign language in early 20th century America. The mythic Helen Keller and the long-forgotten American Blind People's higher Education and General Improvement Association each struggle to shape public and private roles for blind Americans. White and black disabled World War I and II veterans contest public policies and cultural values to claim their citizenship rights. Neurasthenic Alice James and injured turn-of-the-century railroadmen grapple with the interplay of disability and gender. Progressive-era rehabilitationists fashion programs to make crippled children economically productive and socially valid, and two Depression-era fathers murder their sons as public opinion blames the boys' mothers for having cherished the lads' lives. These and many other figures lead readers through hospital-schools, courtrooms, advocacy journals, and beyond to discover disability's past.

Coupling empirical evidence with the interdisciplinary tools and insights of disability studies, the book explores the complex meanings of disability as identity and cultural signifier in American history.

Table of Contents

About the Author

Author of The Invention of George Washington, Paul K. Longmore is Professor of History and Director of the Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University. Associate Professor of History at Suffolk University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814785645
Editor:
Longmore, Paul K.
Editor:
Umansky, Lauri
Editor:
Longmore, Paul K.
Editor:
Umansky, Lauri
Author:
Longmore, Paul
Author:
Bentall, Richard
Author:
Umansky, Lauri
Author:
Longmore, Paul K.
Publisher:
New York University Press
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Handicapped
Subject:
Sociology of disability
Subject:
People with disabilities
Subject:
SOCIOLOGY, SOCIAL STUDIES
Subject:
DISABILITY: SOCIAL ASPECTS
Subject:
ETHICAL ISSUES AND DEBATES_USA
Subject:
People with disabilities - United States
Subject:
Sociology of disability -- United States.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Disability
Subject:
Mental Illness
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
The history of disability series
Series Volume:
1510
Publication Date:
20010331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
422
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Disability
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The New Disability History: American Perspectives (History of Disability) New Trade Paper
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Product details 422 pages New York University Press - English 9780814785645 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Toward the end of the twentieth century, the solution to mental illness seemed to be found. It lay in biological solutions, focusing on mental illness as a problem of the brain, to be managed or improved through drugs. We entered the "Prozac Age" and believed we had moved far beyond the time of frontal lobotomies to an age of good and successful mental healthcare. Biological psychiatry had triumphed.

Except maybe it hadn't. Starting with surprising evidence from the World Health Organization that suggests that people recover better from mental illness in a developing country than in the first world, Doctoring the Mind asks the question: how good are our mental healthcare services, really? Richard P. Bentall picks apart the science that underlies our current psychiatric practice. He puts the patient back at the heart of treatment for mental illness, making the case that a good relationship between patients and their doctors is the most important indicator of whether someone will recover.

Arguing passionately for a future of mental health treatment that focuses as much on patients as individuals as on the brain itself, this is a book set to redefine our understanding of the treatment of madness in the twenty-first century.

"Synopsis" by , Disability has always been a preoccupation of American society and culture. From antebellum debates about qualification for citizenship to current controversies over access and reasonable accommodations, disability has been present, in penumbra if not in print, on virtually every page of American history. Yet historians have only recently begun the deep excavation necessary to retrieve lives shrouded in religious, then medical, and always deep-seated cultural, misunderstanding.

This volume opens up disability's hidden history. In these pages, a North Carolina Youth finds his identity as a deaf Southerner challenged in Civil War-era New York. Deaf community leaders ardently defend sign language in early 20th century America. The mythic Helen Keller and the long-forgotten American Blind People's higher Education and General Improvement Association each struggle to shape public and private roles for blind Americans. White and black disabled World War I and II veterans contest public policies and cultural values to claim their citizenship rights. Neurasthenic Alice James and injured turn-of-the-century railroadmen grapple with the interplay of disability and gender. Progressive-era rehabilitationists fashion programs to make crippled children economically productive and socially valid, and two Depression-era fathers murder their sons as public opinion blames the boys' mothers for having cherished the lads' lives. These and many other figures lead readers through hospital-schools, courtrooms, advocacy journals, and beyond to discover disability's past.

Coupling empirical evidence with the interdisciplinary tools and insights of disability studies, the book explores the complex meanings of disability as identity and cultural signifier in American history.

Table of Contents

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