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Watch This!: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity)

by

Watch This!: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the post civil rights era, African American religious broadcasters have a seemingly ubiquitous presence in popular culture. Through their constant television broadcasts, mass video distributions, and printed publications they have greatly influenced the landscape of African American Christian practice. They are on par with popular entertainers and athletes in the African American community as cultural icons even as they are criticized by others for taking advantage of the devout in order to subsidize their lavish lifestyles.

For these reasons questions abound. Do televangelists proclaim the message of the gospel or a message of greed? Do they represent the "authentic" voice of the black church or is it the Christian Right in blackface? Does the phenomenon reflect orthodox "Christianity" or ethnocentric "Americaninity" wrapped in religious language?

Watch This! seeks to move beyond such polarizing debates by critically delving into the dominant messages and aesthetic styles of African American televangelists, and evaluating their ethical implications.

With an early focus on "Rev. Ike" and initial versions of the prosperity message, Walton places the contemporary phenomenon of black religious broadcasting in historical perspective, demonstrating that the types of syncretic and sensational black Christian practices witnessed on today's airwaves have been brewing within Pentecostal storefronts and on black religious radio for the majority of the twentieth century. He goes on to illumine the diversity of theology and social thought among popular black religious broadcasters in order to delineate the differences among figures often lumped together as monolithic. In so doing, Walton provides a principled ethical analysis that situates televangelists against a larger cultural backdrop, evaluating them according to their own self-understandings and ecclesial agendas. From T.D. Jakes to Bishop Eddie Long to Pastor Creflo Dollar, Walton argues that despite their emphasis on social and economic advancement in the African American community, these leaders' ministries frustrate their own liberatory aims and unwittingly reinforce class, racial, and gender injustices in America.

Watch This! provides a nuanced examination of African American religious broadcasting that is certain to enrich our understanding of this prevalent and pervasive form of popular and political culture.

Synopsis:

Through their constant television broadcasts, mass video distributions, and printed publications, African American religious broadcasters have a seemingly ubiquitous presence in popular culture. They are on par with popular entertainers and athletes in the African American community as cultural icons even as they are criticized by others for taking advantage of the devout in order to subsidize their lavish lifestyles.

For these reasons questions abound. Do televangelists proclaim the message of the gospel or a message of greed? Do they represent the "authentic" voice of the black church or the Christian Right in blackface? Does the phenomenon reflect orthodox "Christianity" or ethnocentric "Americaninity" wrapped in religious language?

Watch This! seeks to move beyond such polarizing debates by critically delving into the dominant messages and aesthetic styles of African American televangelists and evaluating their ethical implications.

About the Author

Jonathan L. Walton is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Riverside.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814794524
Author:
Walton, Jonathan L.
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Walton, Jonathan
Author:
Kagarlitsky, Boris
Subject:
Christian Ministry - Evangelism
Subject:
Christianity - General
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
History
Subject:
Christian Life - Spiritual Growth
Subject:
United States Church history 20th century.
Subject:
African Americans - Religion
Subject:
Christianity
Subject:
Evangelism
Subject:
Christianity -- Evangelism.
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Religion, Race, and Ethnicity
Publication Date:
20090231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
300
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects


Religion » Christianity » Christian Life » Spiritual Growth
Religion » Christianity » Evangelism
Religion » Christianity » General

Watch This!: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) New Trade Paper
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Product details 300 pages New York University Press - English 9780814794524 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Through their constant television broadcasts, mass video distributions, and printed publications, African American religious broadcasters have a seemingly ubiquitous presence in popular culture. They are on par with popular entertainers and athletes in the African American community as cultural icons even as they are criticized by others for taking advantage of the devout in order to subsidize their lavish lifestyles.

For these reasons questions abound. Do televangelists proclaim the message of the gospel or a message of greed? Do they represent the "authentic" voice of the black church or the Christian Right in blackface? Does the phenomenon reflect orthodox "Christianity" or ethnocentric "Americaninity" wrapped in religious language?

Watch This! seeks to move beyond such polarizing debates by critically delving into the dominant messages and aesthetic styles of African American televangelists and evaluating their ethical implications.

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