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Chiricahua Mountains: Bridging the Borders of Wildness (Desert Places)

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Chiricahua Mountains: Bridging the Borders of Wildness (Desert Places) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For many, these mountains represent the Apache stronghold of Geronimo. For others, they are a birdwatcher's paradise. But the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona are more than this. They are a classic "sky island" of the desert, a rich storehouse of biologic diversity. On a journey undertaken in search of a pair of rare short-tailed hawks, Ken Lamberton takes readers on an excursion through these mountains, from their riparian canyons to their highest peaks. The Chiricahuas comprise the largest single range in southern Arizona, crisscrossed by more than 300 miles of trails. Lamberton is your guide along these trails, and his knowledge of the mountains and their natural history makes him a perfect hiking companion while Jeff Garton's stunning photographs enrich your visit. Lamberton shares insights about the geology, habitats, and diversity of wildlife in a place of such isolation that species must either adapt or become extinct. The Chiricahuas are one link in a chain of mountains connecting the Rockies to the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, and some Madrean species reach the northernmost extension of their ranges here: birds like sulphur-bellied flycatchers, mammals like jaguarundis, and trees like the Apache pine. But this is not an untraveled wilderness. We learn why the Chiricahuas are so popular with birders, who flock to these mountains from around the world in the hopes of spotting some of the nearly four hundred avian species found here. We also learn something of the Chiricahua's rich human culture, from Apache warriors to European settlers. Gracing the text are more than a dozen black-and-white photographs by Jeff Garton that offer views of the Chiricahuas different from those usually found in tourist brochures: landscapes and riparian settings, rock formations and plant studies that give readers a lasting impression of the beauty and tranquility of this wilderness. Together words and images convey an intimate view of one of the Southwest's most exotic locations—stronghold, paradise, and everlasting island in the vast and rolling desert.

Book News Annotation:

Rising abruptly out of the Arizona desert, the Chiricahua Mountains contain a wealth of plant and animal species not found anywhere else in the world. In a narrative essay, nature writer Lamberton describes the natural wonders he encountered on his own journey through the region. He also considers the area's geologic history and human culture—from Apache warriors to European settlers. Black and white photographs by Jeff Garton accompany the text.
Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

For many, these mountains represent the Apache stronghold of Geronimo. For others, they are a birdwatcher's paradise. But the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona are more than this. They are a classic "sky island" of the desert, a rich storehouse of biologic diversity. On a journey undertaken in search of a pair of rare short-tailed hawks, Ken Lamberton takes readers on an excursion through these mountains, from their riparian canyons to their highest peaks. The Chiricahuas comprise the largest single range in southern Arizona, crisscrossed by more than 300 miles of trails. Lamberton is your guide along these trails, and his knowledge of the mountains and their natural history makes him a perfect hiking companion while Jeff Garton's stunning photographs enrich your visit. Lamberton shares insights about the geology, habitats, and diversity of wildlife in a place of such isolation that species must either adapt or become extinct. The Chiricahuas are one link in a chain of mountains connecting the Rockies to the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, and some Madrean species reach the northernmost extension of their ranges here: birds like sulphur-bellied flycatchers, mammals like jaguarundis, and trees like the Apache pine. But this is not an untraveled wilderness. We learn why the Chiricahuas are so popular with birders, who flock to these mountains from around the world in the hopes of spotting some of the nearly four hundred avian species found here. We also learn something of the Chiricahua's rich human culture, from Apache warriors to European settlers. Gracing the text are more than a dozen black-and-white photographs by Jeff Garton that offer views of the Chiricahuas different from those usually found in tourist brochures: landscapes and riparian settings, rock formations and plant studies that give readers a lasting impression of the beauty and tranquility of this wilderness. Together words and images convey an intimate view of one of the Southwest's most exotic locations—stronghold, paradise, and everlasting island in the vast and rolling desert.

Synopsis:

This gorgeous photo-essay takes readers deep into the Chiricahuas--birdwatcher's paradise, Geronimo's hideout, and biological and cultural treasure.

About the Author

Ken Lamberton is the author of Wilderness and Razor Wire, winner of the 2002 John Burroughs Medal for nature writing.Jeff Garton's photography has appeared in such magazines as Arizona Highways, Audubon, and Sierra and in the book Grand Canyon: The Great Abyss by Page Stegner.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816522903
Preface:
Garton, Jeff
Author:
Lamberton, Ken
Photographer:
Garton, Jeff
Author:
Garton, Jeff
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Location:
Tucson
Subject:
General
Subject:
Description and travel
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Ecology
Subject:
United States - Mountain - Arizona
Subject:
Natural history
Subject:
Chiricahua Mountains
Subject:
Subjects & Themes - Travel - U.S./West
Subject:
Chiricahua Mountains (Ariz.) -
Subject:
Nature and Environment
Subject:
Biology-Reference
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Desert Places
Series Volume:
v. 5
Publication Date:
20031031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
86
Dimensions:
7 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Photography » General
History and Social Science » Americana » Southwest
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Reference
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Travel » North America » United States » Western States

Chiricahua Mountains: Bridging the Borders of Wildness (Desert Places) New Trade Paper
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Product details 86 pages University of Arizona Press - English 9780816522903 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , For many, these mountains represent the Apache stronghold of Geronimo. For others, they are a birdwatcher's paradise. But the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona are more than this. They are a classic "sky island" of the desert, a rich storehouse of biologic diversity. On a journey undertaken in search of a pair of rare short-tailed hawks, Ken Lamberton takes readers on an excursion through these mountains, from their riparian canyons to their highest peaks. The Chiricahuas comprise the largest single range in southern Arizona, crisscrossed by more than 300 miles of trails. Lamberton is your guide along these trails, and his knowledge of the mountains and their natural history makes him a perfect hiking companion while Jeff Garton's stunning photographs enrich your visit. Lamberton shares insights about the geology, habitats, and diversity of wildlife in a place of such isolation that species must either adapt or become extinct. The Chiricahuas are one link in a chain of mountains connecting the Rockies to the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, and some Madrean species reach the northernmost extension of their ranges here: birds like sulphur-bellied flycatchers, mammals like jaguarundis, and trees like the Apache pine. But this is not an untraveled wilderness. We learn why the Chiricahuas are so popular with birders, who flock to these mountains from around the world in the hopes of spotting some of the nearly four hundred avian species found here. We also learn something of the Chiricahua's rich human culture, from Apache warriors to European settlers. Gracing the text are more than a dozen black-and-white photographs by Jeff Garton that offer views of the Chiricahuas different from those usually found in tourist brochures: landscapes and riparian settings, rock formations and plant studies that give readers a lasting impression of the beauty and tranquility of this wilderness. Together words and images convey an intimate view of one of the Southwest's most exotic locations—stronghold, paradise, and everlasting island in the vast and rolling desert.
"Synopsis" by , This gorgeous photo-essay takes readers deep into the Chiricahuas--birdwatcher's paradise, Geronimo's hideout, and biological and cultural treasure.
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