The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer

On Order

$66.75
New Hardcover
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Reference- Rhetoric

Other titles in the Rhetoric, Culture, and Social Critique series:

The House of My Sojourn: Rhetoric, Women, and the Question of Authority (Albma Rhetoric Cult & Soc Crit)

by

The House of My Sojourn: Rhetoric, Women, and the Question of Authority (Albma Rhetoric Cult & Soc Crit) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Employing the trope of architecture, Jane Sutton envisions the relationship between women and rhetoric as a house: a structure erected in ancient Greece by men that, historically, has made room for women but has also denied them the authority and agency to speak from within. Suttonand#8217;s central argument is that all attempts to include women in rhetoric exclude them from meaningful authority in due course, and this exclusion has been built into the foundations of rhetoric.

and#160;

Drawing on personal experience, the spatial tropes of ancient Greek architecture, and the study of women who attained significant places in the house of rhetoric, Sutton highlights a number of decisive turns where women were able to increase their rhetorical access but were not able to achieve full authority, among them the work of Frances Wright, Lucy Stone, and suffragists Mott, Anthony, and Stanton; a visit to the 1893 Worldand#8217;s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, where the busts that became the Portrait Monument were displayed in the Womanand#8217;s Building (a sideshow, in essence); and a study of working-class women employed as telephone operators in New York in 1919.

and#160;

With all the undeniable successesand#8212;socially, politically, and financiallyand#8212; of modern women, it appears that women are now populating the house of rhetoric as never before. But getting in the house and having public authority once inside are not the same thing. Sutton argues that women and#8220;can only act as far as the house permits.and#8221; Sojourn calls for a fundamental change in the very foundations of rhetoric.

Synopsis:

Employing the trope of architecture, Jane Sutton envisions the relationship between women and rhetoric as a house: a structure erected in ancient Greece by men that, historically, has made room for women but has also denied them the authority and agency to speak from within. Suttonandrsquo;s central argument is that all attempts to include women in rhetoric exclude them from meaningful authority in due course, and this exclusion has been built into the foundations of rhetoric.

About the Author

Jane S. Sutton is Associate Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at The Pennsylvania State University, York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780817317157
Author:
Sutton, Jane S.
Publisher:
University Alabama Press
Subject:
Rhetoric
Subject:
Communication and culture
Subject:
Communication Studies
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
Reference-Rhetoric
Edition Description:
1st Edition
Series:
Albma Rhetoric Cult and Soc Crit
Publication Date:
20101131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 Illustrations
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Business » Communication
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Intercultural Communications » General
Reference » Rhetoric

The House of My Sojourn: Rhetoric, Women, and the Question of Authority (Albma Rhetoric Cult & Soc Crit) New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$66.75 Backorder
Product details 232 pages University Alabama Press - English 9780817317157 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Employing the trope of architecture, Jane Sutton envisions the relationship between women and rhetoric as a house: a structure erected in ancient Greece by men that, historically, has made room for women but has also denied them the authority and agency to speak from within. Suttonandrsquo;s central argument is that all attempts to include women in rhetoric exclude them from meaningful authority in due course, and this exclusion has been built into the foundations of rhetoric.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.