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Other titles in the John Hope Franklin Center Books series:

The Last "Darky": Bert Williams, Black-On-Black Minstrelsy, and the African Diaspora (John Hope Franklin Center Books)

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The Last "Darky": Bert Williams, Black-On-Black Minstrelsy, and the African Diaspora (John Hope Franklin Center Books) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

The Last “Darky” establishes Bert Williams, the comedian of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, as central to the development of a global black modernism centered in Harlem’s Renaissance. Before integrating Broadway in 1910 via a controversial stint with the Ziegfeld Follies, Williams was already an international icon. Yet his name has faded into near obscurity, his extraordinary accomplishments forgotten largely because he performed in blackface. Louis Chude-Sokei contends that Williams’s blackface was not a display of internalized racism nor a submission to the expectations of the moment. It was an appropriation and exploration of the contradictory and potentially liberating power of racial stereotypes.

Chude-Sokei makes the crucial argument that Williams’s minstrelsy negotiated the place of black immigrants in the cultural hotbed of New York City and was replicated throughout the African diaspora, from the Caribbean to Africa itself. Williams was born in the Bahamas. When performing the “darky,” he was actually masquerading as an African American. This black-on-black minstrelsy thus challenged emergent racial constructions equating “black” with African American and marginalizing the many diasporic blacks in New York. It also dramatized the practice of passing for African American common among non-American blacks in an African American–dominated Harlem. Exploring the thought of figures such as Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Claude McKay, Chude-Sokei situates black-on-black minstrelsy at the center of burgeoning modernist discourses of assimilation, separatism, race militancy, carnival, and internationalism. While these discourses were engaged with the question of representing the “Negro” in the context of white racism, through black-on-black minstrelsy they were also deployed against the growing international influence of African American culture and politics in the twentieth century.

Synopsis:

Examines the use of Africa as a figure in the Harlem Renaissance and looks at the place of that movement within a wider Black modernism.

Synopsis:

"The Last "Darky"" establishes the late 19th- and early 20th-century comedian Bert Williams, an Afro-Caribbean who often performed in blackface, as central to the development of a global black modernism centered in Harlem's Renaissance.

About the Author

“Louis Chude-Sokei’s innovative study not only brings overdue attention to Bert Williams. It deepens our understanding of black modernity and redirects the study of minstrelsy as well. A rich, wide-ranging book, it is filled with resonant insights and brilliant collocations.”—Nathaniel Mackey, author of Paracritical Hinge
“With theoretical verve and archival aplomb, Louis Chude-Sokei explores an open secret that we too often have preferred to ignore: the central role of black minstrelsy in the origins of the Harlem Renaissance. Starting with the simple fact of Bert Williams’s Caribbean origins, he finds the multiple layers of masquerade in any performance of ‘race.’ A timely, often profound portrait of the dynamics of intraracial difference in diaspora.”—Brent Hayes Edwards, author of The Practice of Diaspora

Product Details

ISBN:
9780822336433
Author:
Chude-sokei, Louis
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Author:
Chude-Sokei, Louis
Subject:
History
Subject:
Theater - History & Criticism
Subject:
Minstrel shows
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Blackface entertainers -- United States.
Subject:
Williams, Bert - Criticism and interpretation
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
John Hope Franklin Center Books
Publication Date:
20060131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Musical Theater
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Vaudeville and Burlesque
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » Caribbean

The Last "Darky": Bert Williams, Black-On-Black Minstrelsy, and the African Diaspora (John Hope Franklin Center Books) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Duke University Press - English 9780822336433 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Examines the use of Africa as a figure in the Harlem Renaissance and looks at the place of that movement within a wider Black modernism.
"Synopsis" by , "The Last "Darky"" establishes the late 19th- and early 20th-century comedian Bert Williams, an Afro-Caribbean who often performed in blackface, as central to the development of a global black modernism centered in Harlem's Renaissance.
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