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Other titles in the Perverse Modernities series:

Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence (Perverse Modernities)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Over the past decade, Korean popular culture has become a global phenomenon. The "Korean Wave" of music, film, television, sports, and cuisine generates significant revenues and cultural pride in South Korea. The Korean Popular Culture Reader provides a timely and essential foundation for the study of "K-pop," relating the contemporary cultural landscape to its historical roots. The eighteen essays in this collection reveal the intimate connections of Korean popular culture, or hallyu, to the peninsula's colonial and postcolonial histories, to the nationalist projects of the military dictatorship and the neoliberalism of twenty-first-century South Korea. Combining translations of seminal essays by Korean scholars on topics ranging from sports to colonial-era serial fiction with new work by scholars based in fields including literary studies, film and media studies, ethnomusicology, and art history, this collection expertly navigates the social and political dynamics that have shaped Korean cultural production over the past century.

Contributors. Jung-hwan Cheon, Michelle Cho, Youngmin Choe, Steven Chung, Katarzyna J. Cwiertka, Stephen Epstein, Olga Fedorenko, Kelly Y. Jeong, Rachael Miyung Joo, Inkyu Kang, Kyu Hyun Kim, Kyung Hyun Kim, Pil Ho Kim, Boduerae Kwon, Regina Yung Lee, Sohl Lee, Jessica Likens, Roald Maliangkay, Youngju Ryu, Hyunjoon Shin, Min-Jung Son, James Turnbull, Travis Workman

Review:

"University of Maryland American studies professor Hanhardt offers a commendable revision of the LGBT story in America, in which competing conceptions of crime, violence, property, and prejudice shaped what became the urban gay neighborhood. Hanhardt argues that there is a complicated connection between calls for gay 'territories' and mainstream anti-violence politics. Such territories are not safe for all, she suggests, and grew out of a multifaceted lineage of impressive diversity. The analysis complicates the simplified narratives of activist groups and political movements that often combined multi-issue politics, militancy, and accommodation with governments in contingent and shifting alliances. It is a dramatic picture of a febrile movement that had a difficult relationship with its competitors. The book further excels by demonstrating this history through the experiences of LGBT people of color, transgender individuals, and immigrants. This rich analysis serves as a useful primer on why gay neighborhoods are at the epicenter of discussions about gentrification. Though its occasional descent into Queer Theory — based obscurity clouds its analysis, the book's argument that the LGBT movement must address complex issues of race, gender, and class is entirely persuasive. 25 illus." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A historical and ethnographic account of how LGBT activism for safe neighborhoods inadvertently dovetailed with and reinforced anticrime measures harmful to the poor and people of color.

Synopsis:

Winner, 2014 Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies

Since the 1970s, a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence, especially in gay neighborhoods. During the same time, policymakers and private developers declared the containment of urban violence to be a top priority. In this important book, Christina B. Hanhardt examines how LGBT calls for andquot;safe spaceandquot; have been shaped by broader public safety initiatives that have sought solutions in policing and privatization and have had devastating effects along race and class lines.

Drawing on extensive archival and ethnographic research in New York City and San Francisco, Hanhardt traces the entwined histories of LGBT activism, urban development, and U.S. policy in relation to poverty and crime over the past fifty years. She highlights the formation of a mainstream LGBT movement, as well as the very different trajectories followed by radical LGBT and queer grassroots organizations. Placing LGBT activism in the context of shifting liberal and neoliberal policies, Safe Space is a groundbreaking exploration of the contradictory legacies of the LGBT struggle for safety in the city.

About the Author

Kyung Hyun Kim is Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of the Critical Theory Emphasis at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Virtual Hallyu: Korean Cinema of the Global Era and The Remasculinization of Korean Cinema, both also published by Duke University Press.

Youngmin Choe is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

1. andquot;The White Ghettoandquot;: Sexual Deviancy, Police Accountability, and the 1960s War on Poverty 35

2. Butterflies, Whistles, and Fists: Safe Streets Patrols and Militant Gay Liberalism in the 1970s 81

3. andquot;Count the Contradictionsandquot;: Challenges to Gay Gentrification at the Start of the Reagan Era 117

4. Visibility and Victimization: Hate Crime Laws and the Geography of Punishment, 1980s and 1990s 155

5. andquot;Canaries of the Creative Ageandquot;: Queer Critiques of Risk and Real Estate in the Twenty-First Century 185

Conclusion 221

Epilogue 227

Appendix: Neighborhood Maps of New York and San Francisco 231

Notes 233

Bibliography 315

Index 335

Product Details

ISBN:
9780822354703
Author:
Hanhardt, Christina B.
Publisher:
Duke University Press
Author:
Kim, Kyung Hyun
Author:
Choe, Youngmin
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Gay Studies
Subject:
Gay and Lesbian-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Perverse Modernities: A Series Edited by Jack Halberstam and Lisa Lowe
Publication Date:
20131231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
23 photographs, 2 maps
Pages:
376
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Pop Vocal
Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » Korea

Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence (Perverse Modernities) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$27.95 In Stock
Product details 376 pages Duke University Press - English 9780822354703 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "University of Maryland American studies professor Hanhardt offers a commendable revision of the LGBT story in America, in which competing conceptions of crime, violence, property, and prejudice shaped what became the urban gay neighborhood. Hanhardt argues that there is a complicated connection between calls for gay 'territories' and mainstream anti-violence politics. Such territories are not safe for all, she suggests, and grew out of a multifaceted lineage of impressive diversity. The analysis complicates the simplified narratives of activist groups and political movements that often combined multi-issue politics, militancy, and accommodation with governments in contingent and shifting alliances. It is a dramatic picture of a febrile movement that had a difficult relationship with its competitors. The book further excels by demonstrating this history through the experiences of LGBT people of color, transgender individuals, and immigrants. This rich analysis serves as a useful primer on why gay neighborhoods are at the epicenter of discussions about gentrification. Though its occasional descent into Queer Theory — based obscurity clouds its analysis, the book's argument that the LGBT movement must address complex issues of race, gender, and class is entirely persuasive. 25 illus." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
A historical and ethnographic account of how LGBT activism for safe neighborhoods inadvertently dovetailed with and reinforced anticrime measures harmful to the poor and people of color.
"Synopsis" by ,
Winner, 2014 Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies

Since the 1970s, a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence, especially in gay neighborhoods. During the same time, policymakers and private developers declared the containment of urban violence to be a top priority. In this important book, Christina B. Hanhardt examines how LGBT calls for andquot;safe spaceandquot; have been shaped by broader public safety initiatives that have sought solutions in policing and privatization and have had devastating effects along race and class lines.

Drawing on extensive archival and ethnographic research in New York City and San Francisco, Hanhardt traces the entwined histories of LGBT activism, urban development, and U.S. policy in relation to poverty and crime over the past fifty years. She highlights the formation of a mainstream LGBT movement, as well as the very different trajectories followed by radical LGBT and queer grassroots organizations. Placing LGBT activism in the context of shifting liberal and neoliberal policies, Safe Space is a groundbreaking exploration of the contradictory legacies of the LGBT struggle for safety in the city.

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