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8 Remote Warehouse Gender Studies- General

This title in other editions

Dying Unneeded: The Cultural Context of the Russian Mortality Crisis

by

Dying Unneeded: The Cultural Context of the Russian Mortality Crisis Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the early 1990s, Russia experienced one of the most extreme increases in mortality in modern history. Men's life expectancy dropped by six years; women's life expectancy dropped by three. Middle-aged men living in Moscow were particularly at risk of dying early deaths. While the early 1990s represent the apex of mortality, the crisis continues. Drawing on fieldwork in the capital city during 2006 and 2007, this account brings ethnography to bear on a topic that has until recently been the province of epidemiology and demography.

Middle-aged Muscovites talk about being unneeded (ne nuzhny), or having little to give others. Considering this concept of "being unneeded" reveals how political economic transformation undermined the logic of social relations whereby individuals used their position within the Soviet state to give things to other people. Being unneeded is also gendered--while women are still needed by their families, men are often unneeded by state or family. Western literature on the mortality crisis focuses on a lack of social capital, often assuming that what individuals receive is most important, but being needed is more about what individuals give. Social connections--and their influence on health--are culturally specific.

In Soviet times, needed people helped friends and acquaintances push against the limits of the state, crafting a sense of space and freedom. When the state collapsed, this sense of bounded freedom was compromised, and another freedom became deadly.

This book is a recipient of the annual Norman L. and Roselea J. Goldberg Prize for the best project in the area of medicine.

Synopsis:

How the country's mortality crisis is as much about how Russians live as about how they die

Synopsis:

Going far beyond risk factors, this ethnography shows how the mortality crisis has as much to with how Russians live as with how they die

About the Author

Michelle A. Parsons is a sociocultural anthropologist with a background in global health. She has lived in Latin America, Spain, Switzerland, Indonesia, and Russia, working for non-governmental organizations and the World Health Organization. She currently teaches at Emory University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826519733
Author:
Parsons, Michelle A.
Publisher:
Vanderbilt University Press
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
global health
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Post-Soviet Studies
Subject:
International development
Subject:
Medical anthropology
Subject:
Gender Studies-General
Edition Description:
short discount paperback
Publication Date:
20140631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Gay and Lesbian » Fiction and Poetry » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Dying Unneeded: The Cultural Context of the Russian Mortality Crisis New Trade Paper
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Product details 224 pages Vanderbilt University Press - English 9780826519733 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How the country's mortality crisis is as much about how Russians live as about how they die
"Synopsis" by , Going far beyond risk factors, this ethnography shows how the mortality crisis has as much to with how Russians live as with how they die
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