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Job Queues, Gender Queues: Explaining Women's Inroads Into Male Occupations (Women in the Political Economy)

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Job Queues, Gender Queues: Explaining Women's Inroads Into Male Occupations (Women in the Political Economy) Cover

 

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Publisher Comments:

Since 1970, women have made widely publicized gains in several customarily male occupations. Many commentators have understood this apparent integration as an important step to sexual equality in the workplace. Barbara F. Reskin and Patricia A. Roos read a different lesson in the changing gender composition of occupations that were traditionally reserved for men. With persuasive evidence, Job Queues, Gender Queues offers a controversial interpretation of women's dramatic inroads into several male occupations based on case studies of "feminizing" male occupation.

The authors propose and develop a queuing theory of occupations' sex composition. This theory contends that the labor market comprises a "gender queue" with employers preferring male to female workers for most jobs. Workers also rank jobs into a "job queue." As a result, the highest-ranked workers monopolize the most desirable jobs. Reskin and Roos use this queuing perspective to explain why several male occupations opened their doors to women after 1970. The second part of the book provides evidence for this queuing analysis by presenting case studies of the feminization of specific occupations. These include book editor, pharmacist, public relations specialist, bank manager, systems analyst, insurance adjuster, insurance salesperson, real estate salesperson, bartender, baker, and typesetter/compositor.

In the series Women in the Political Economy, edited by Ronnie J. Steinberg.

 

Synopsis:

A controversial interpretation of women's dramatic inroads into several male occupations

About the Author

Barbara Reskin is Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois and Vice President of the American Sociological Association. She has published several books, including Women's Work, Men's Work: Sex Segregation on the Job (co-authored with Heidi Hartmann).

Table of Contents

Preface

Part I: Explaining the Changing Sex Composition of Occupations

1. Occupational Sex Segregation: Persistence and Change

2. Queuing and Changing Occupational Composition

3. Consequences of Desegregation: Occupational Integration and Economic Equity?

Part II: Case Studies of Occupation Change

4. Culture, Commerce and Gender: The Feminization of Book Editing – Barbara F. Reskin

5. Industrial and Occupational Change in Pharmacy: Prescription for Feminization – Polly A. Phipps

6. Keepers of the Corporate Image: Women in Public Relations – Katharine M. Donato

7. High Finance, Small Change: Women's Increased Representation in Bank Management – Chloe E. Bud

8. Programming for Change? The Growing Demand for Women Systems Analysts – Katharine M. Donato

9. Women's Gains in Insurance Sales: Increased Supply, Uncertain Demand – Barbara J. Thomas

10. A Woman's Place is Selling Homes: Occupational Change and the Feminization of Real Estate Sales – Barbara J. Thomas and Barbara F. Reskin

11. Occupational Resegregation among Insurance Adjusters and Examiners – Polly A. Phipps

12. Women Behind Bars: The Feminization of Bartending – Linda A. Detman

13. Baking and Baking Off: Deskilling and the Changing Sex Makeup of Bakers – Thomas Steiger and Barbara F. Reskin

14. Hot-Metal to Electronic Composition: Gender, Technology, and Social Change – Patricia A. Roos

Part III: Conclusion

Summary, Implications, and Prospects

Appendix: Guidelines Used for Occupation Case Studies

References

Name Index

Subject Index

About the Authors

Product Details

ISBN:
9780877227441
Author:
Reskin, Barbara F.
Author:
Roos, Patricia A.
Author:
Reskin, Barbara
Publisher:
Temple University Press
Location:
Philadelphia :
Subject:
Women & Business
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Sociology, anthropology and archaeology
Subject:
Equal pay for equal work
Subject:
Labor
Subject:
Pay equity
Subject:
Sexual division of labor
Subject:
Pay equity -- United States.
Subject:
Sexual division of labor -- United States.
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
General-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Women in the Political Economy (Paperback)
Series Volume:
9254
Publication Date:
19901131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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